THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU
201 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Robots and Robotics
Scoop.it!

Your Robot Helper is On The Way Now It Can Learn From Its Friends

Your Robot Helper is On The Way Now It Can Learn From Its Friends | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it
LiveScience.com
Your Robot Helper is On The Way Now It Can Learn From Its Friends (Op-Ed)
LiveScience.com
January is a time when many of us seek to better ourselves. We want to learn a new skill or improve an existing one.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

Another step towards The Siingularity

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

When Will We Have Robots To Help With Household Chores?

When Will We Have Robots To Help With Household Chores? | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it
Google, Microsoft, and Apple are investing in robots. Does that mean home robots are on the way?

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

It means ROBOTS may replace humans in numerous ways. Some I don't want to think about :-)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Turning off the ‘aging genes’ | KurzweilAI

Turning off the ‘aging genes’ | KurzweilAI | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it

Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a computer algorithm that predicts which genes can be “turned off” to create the same anti-aging effect as calorie restriction*. The findings, reported in Nature Communications, could lead to the development of new drugs to treat aging.

 

“Most algorithms try to find drug targets that kill cells to treat cancer or bacterial infections,” says Keren Yizhak, a doctoral student in Prof. Eytan Ruppin’s laboratory. “Our algorithm is the first in our field to look for drug targets not to kill cells, but to transform them from a diseased state into a healthy one.”

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

Want to stay forever young? Turn off your aging genes

more...
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 6, 2014 12:33 PM

DO YOU WANT TO LIVE FOREVER? 

Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Web 3.0
Scoop.it!

A Scientist Predicts the Future

A Scientist Predicts the Future | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it

When making predictions, I have two criteria: the laws of physics must be obeyed and prototypes must exist that demonstrate “proof of principle.” I’ve interviewed more than 300 of the world’s top scientists, and many allowed me into laboratories where they are inventing the future. Their accomplishments and dreams are eye-opening. From my conversations with them, here’s a glimpse of what to expect in the coming decades:


Via Pierre Tran
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

MY FAVORITE PHYSICIST PREDICTS THE FUTURE-YOU SHOULD PAY ATTENTION :-)

more...
Teresa Lima's curator insight, January 10, 2014 4:38 AM

#Not 

I think the future is unpredictable, and no one  can predict the future!

Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, January 16, 2014 7:38 AM

Predicción científica del futuro, esto es un tema a leer por lo menos.

Jesús Martinez's curator insight, January 18, 2014 8:07 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Ask Ray | Supplement study quoted in The Wall Street Journal is misleading | KurzweilAI

Ask Ray | Supplement study quoted in The Wall Street Journal is misleading | KurzweilAI | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it

 

Dear readers, I read this recent article: The Wall Street Journal | Multivitamins found to have little benefit --- no effect seen in preventing cognitive

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

GMO foods do not provide the vitamins and minerals we need to be healthy which is why we need supplements. 

more...
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Michio Kaku: What does the future look like?

Dr. Michio Kaku, Professor of Theoretical Physics at City University of New York shares his vision of mankind's future.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

MICHIO KAKU IS MY FAVORITE THEORETICAL PHYSICIST 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it

Computers have entered the age when they are able to learn from their own mistakes, a development that is about to turn the digital world on its head.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

The Singularity is not far away

more...
VendorFit's curator insight, December 31, 2013 3:27 PM

Artificial intelligence is the holy grail of technological achievment, creating an entity that can learn from its own mistakes and can (independently of programmer intervention) develop new routines and programs.  The New York Times claims that the first ever "learning" computer chip is to be released in 2014, an innovation that has profound consequences for the tech market.  When these devices become cheaper, this should allow for robotics and device manufacture that incorporates more detailed sensory input and can parse real objects, like faces, from background noise. 

Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Turning off the ‘aging genes’ | KurzweilAI

Turning off the ‘aging genes’ | KurzweilAI | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it

Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a computer algorithm that predicts which genes can be “turned off” to create the same anti-aging effect as calorie restriction*. The findings, reported in Nature Communications, could lead to the development of new drugs to treat aging.

 

“Most algorithms try to find drug targets that kill cells to treat cancer or bacterial infections,” says Keren Yizhak, a doctoral student in Prof. Eytan Ruppin’s laboratory. “Our algorithm is the first in our field to look for drug targets not to kill cells, but to transform them from a diseased state into a healthy one.”

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

DO YOU WANT TO LIVE FOREVER? 

more...
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 4, 2014 3:13 PM

Want to stay forever young? Turn off your aging genes

Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Vitamin E may slow early Alzheimer's decline: study

Taking vitamin E during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease slowed declines in patients' ability to perform basic tasks by about six months in a new study.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

VItamin E for Alzheimers-no known side effects observed to date

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Brains on Trial: Determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain

Brains on Trial: Determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it
What if we could peer into a brain and see guilt or innocence? Brain scanning technology is trying to break its way into the courtroom, but can we—and should we—determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain?

 

Join a distinguished group of neuroscientists and legal experts who will debate how and if neuroscience should inform our laws and how we treat criminals. This World Science Festival program is based on a two-part PBS special, “Brains on Trial with Alan Alda,” which aired on September 11 and 18, 2013, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

Although this may be possible there is always the chance it could be wrong and then we have Vanilla Sky.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Laura E. Mirian, PhD from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Google Acquires Seven Robot Companies, Wants to Play a Big Role in Robotics

Google Acquires Seven Robot Companies, Wants to Play a Big Role in Robotics | THE FUTURE AS SEEN BY MICHIO KAKU | Scoop.it

A few months ago, Andy Rubin, the engineer who spearheaded the development of Android at Google, initiated a new robotics effort at the company. Rubin, who is personally interested in robots, now wants Google to have a major role in making new kinds of robotics happen. Not just robotic cars, but actual real robots. A recent article in the New York Times has revealed more about Google's plans. According to the article, Google is funding a major new robotics group, and that includes acquiring a bunch of robotics startups:


Among the companies are Schaft, a small team of Japanese roboticists who recently left Tokyo University to develop a humanoid robot, and Industrial Perception, a start-up here that has developed computer vision systems and robot arms for loading and unloading trucks. Also acquired were Meka and Redwood Robotics, makers of humanoid robots and robot arms in San Francisco, and Bot & Dolly, a maker of robotic camera systems that were recently used to create special effects in the movie “Gravity.” A related firm, Autofuss, which focuses on advertising and design, and Holomni, a small design firm that makes high-tech wheels, were acquired as well.

 


The seven companies are capable of creating technologies needed to build a mobile, dexterous robot. Mr. Rubin said he was pursuing additional acquisitions.

 

 

Some brief highlights:

Schaft is one of the Track A teams participating in the DARPA Robotics Challenge with their own custom robot based on the HRP-2.Industrial Perception spun out of Willow Garage back in March of 2012; read our Startup Spotlight post on them here.Meka Robotics builds research robots with series elastic actuators in them; they're probably best known for the M1 humanoid (pictured above in front of the Google logo) and Dreamer, which you can read about here.Redwood Robotics is (was) a collaboration between Willow Garage, SRI, and Meka that was supposedly designing a very low cost robotic arm. We've been asking around and haven't heard much for the last year or so, maybe now we know why.And of course, there's Bot & Dolly, which uses robot arms for precise and repeatable camera control, making things way more awesome than "precise and repeatable camera control" probably makes you think of.

 

Obviously, we're curious about what other acquisitions Rubin is pursuing, and more generally, just what Google is actually working on. Fortunately for us, the Google robotics group will at least initially be based right here in Palo Alto, meaning that I'll get a chance to put my spy drones and ninja outfit to good use.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Laura E. Mirian, PhD's insight:

THE SINGULARITY IS GETTING CLOSER AND CLOSER

more...
Antonio Marcos Alberti's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:02 PM

A guess: probably, they are looking for hardware to implement the embodiment of their AI solutions - mainly being designed by Kurzweil. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, December 12, 2013 3:08 PM

It's too soon to think Terminator, Matrix, and "I, Robot" - but not too soon to see a trend developing to make robots a reality in our daily lives, beyond that of manufacturing. ~  D