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The Funnily Enough
The whole world of writing in one place
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Character Movement and Fight Scenes

Character Movement and Fight Scenes | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Relatively speaking, you should incorporate very little actual physical description because this will bore the reader. It’s also unrealistic. When someone is in the middle of action, they can’t and won’t notice everything. At the same time, they can experience time distortion and time will seem to slow down so that person may notice quite a bit in what actually took only a split second. These are qualities you should be sure to note in your fight scenes.

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How to Create Suspense

How to Create Suspense | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

This is how you create suspense:

 

Don’t withhold sensitive information that could put your characters in danger. Instead, broadcast that sensitive information to your reader as soon as possible. That way, your reader has no choice but to walk on eggshells for the rest of your story, keeping them engaged and glued to the page until the very end.

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Making Tension Tense

Making Tension Tense | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

What really makes tension tense?

 

The modern reader’s expectation of tension—a story that stands above the crowd—can seem to the aspiring writer sometimes unbearably high. And yet it’s always been true that storytelling is about tension. The reader has always longed to be transported physically to another dimension through sheer adrenaline.

So let’s talk about what makes tension tense.

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Dun dun DUN: Suspense In Your Story

Dun dun DUN: Suspense In Your Story | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Every story needs stakes, right? And every story needs suspense–after all, what’s the point in high stakes if you’re not worried the protagonist won’t make it there? Suspense doesn’t have to mean Hitchcock style terror–it can be King George VI’s big speech at the end of The King’s Speech, or Hugh Grant’s mad dash at the end of Notting Hill. Every book needs a will-they-or-won’t-they element, and that’s where suspense comes in.

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