The Funnily Enough
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The Funnily Enough
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Secondary Characters

Virtually every story features at least two characters, either pitting them against one another or having them working toward a shared goal. This mirrors our lives, where we’re in contact with others daily, sometimes hourly. Sometimes every single moment of every single day.

 

Even the least social among us must rely on or deal with others. Unless we’re totally self-sufficient, someone else makes our clothing or our food or our mode of transportation or our homes.

 

We need other people.

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How Much Do You Need to Describe Your Characters?

How Much Do You Need to Describe Your Characters? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

At some point in your story, you'll have to decide how much to include about the physical description of a character. You don't want to describe your characters to death, but you also want to describe them so readers can get an idea of what they look like. How much is too much and how little is too little?

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Just Another Day: Slice of Life Stories

Just Another Day: Slice of Life Stories | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Slice if life stories can be a lot harder to pull off than your typical plot-driven novel, because character growth isn't all that exciting in and of itself. It's the results of that growth, the struggle for that growth that intrigue us. Not a lot of stuff happens during "growth" like it does with a protag trying to solve an external problem. But there are ways to make these internal stories just as gripping as their action-packed counterparts.

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Too much characterization? Too little? Prioritize

Too much characterization? Too little? Prioritize | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Is there such a thing as too much characterization? By that, I mean, can you invest too much time into developing some characters to the point of derailing a project?

 

I'd argue that yes, you can. Not every character warrants developing a back story, motivation, wound. If you did take the time to do that for every walk-on, a story could quickly become tangent-riddled every time someone new entered a scene.

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How to Bring Your Characters Into Focus

How to Bring Your Characters Into Focus | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Are you a visual thinker?

 

Quick, take this test. Open a magazine to any page. What is the first thing you notice? If it’s an image or a splash of color, you are probably a visual thinker.

 

If, like me, it’s the words that catch your attention, then visualization is probably not your strong suit. I’ve always struggled with the physicality of my characters, particularly main characters.

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Interesting Characters: You are what you eat

Interesting Characters: You are what you eat | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Story is viewed differently by the writer than it is by the reader.

 

A writer knows what kind of person he is writing about, and uses that to inform what that character does on the page.

 

A reader knows what a character does and uses that to understand what kind of person that character is.

 

Both are looking at the same thing, but from different ends. The thing they are both looking at is this: what people do reveals the truth of who they are.

 

But truth and fact are NOT the same thing.

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