The Funnily Enough
48.4K views | +4 today
Follow
The Funnily Enough
The whole world of writing in one place
Curated by mooderino
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

5 Self-editing Steps You MUST Take Before an Editor or Agent

5 Self-editing Steps You MUST Take Before an Editor or Agent | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

You’ve done it. As you type “The End” and move your mouse up to the little “Save” button in the corner, you feel like running down the street screaming “I’M AN AUTHOR! I’M GOING TO BE FAMOUS!”

 

This jubilant response is not wrong—it’s just premature.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How To Write A 1-Page Synopsis

One thing writers hate doing but will inevitably have to do (one day or another, at least) is the Dreaded Synopsis. An agent may request it in his/her submission materials, or an editor might want it once your agent has you out on subs.

 

So in other words: you have to learn to do this. You need it before you’re published, and you’ll certainly need it afterwards. Specifically, you’ll need to be able to write the 1 or 2-page synopsis.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Romantic Fiction: It's All Over, Casanova

Romantic Fiction: It's All Over, Casanova | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Romance novels make a lot of money. Even the bad ones. The demand is very high. Around 50% of all fiction books sold in North America are romances. In Britain the number is around 20%.

 

What’s more most of these books are written by women and read by women.

 

So what is it about this genre that makes it so successful, and what can the boys do to emulate that success?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

13 Ways To Show (Rather than Tell) in Your Love Story

13 Ways To Show (Rather than Tell) in Your Love Story | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

When romance writers create a Happily-Ever-After tale, there has to be more to the relationship than simply LUST between the hero and heroine. As many a woman has discovered in real life, lust doesn’t last forever. (Shh, don’t tell my husband!)

 

Whether you are writing an Erotic Romance, an Inspirational Romance or anything in between, you need to deepen that relationship to make the ‘forever’ believable.

 

Here are some of the elements you can show to convince your readers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Stop Feeling Your Writing

Stop Feeling Your Writing | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

How often does this happen to you? You yearn for a descriptive phrase, only to muck it up.

 

I could feel the glop slithering down my hand.

 

It sounds great, but do you really need the word “feel”? The sentence becomes much more immediate without it.

 

Glop slithered down my hand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

CPD Is Like A Toolbox: Use It & Improve It for Better Writing

CPD Is Like A Toolbox: Use It & Improve It for Better Writing | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Years ago, if you put in time practicing the skills you needed for your job, you were considered to be ‘learning your craft’. Nowadays, it’s been given a fancy new title, and most professionals will be all too aware of ‘continued professional development’, or CPD. The idea is that you continually build and improve your toolbox of skills you need to do your job, and you’re continually on top of new ideas or codes of practice within your industry.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Character Connection

Character Connection | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

One of the most common reasons for rejecting a manuscript is when the agent or editor can’t connect with the main character. Sometimes this is subjective; other times it’s not.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Only One Thing Will Make You A Better Writer

Only One Thing Will Make You A Better Writer | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Obviously, you need to hone your craft and develop your skills, and there are certainly a multitude of styles and genres to choose from. But the one thing you definitely have to be is open. Open to the idea your work might need to improve.

 

But you can’t be honest about what you need to do with your writing if you worry about what other people think of you. What they think of your writing is another matter. But tying up your self-worth with the stories you produce is not helpful.

 

The work is the work, and you are you.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Final edits – what do you look for?

Final edits – what do you look for? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

When your novel is as familiar as the sight of your two hands typing, what do you miss?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Living on the Wall: Not Knowing What Happens Next in Your Story

Living on the Wall: Not Knowing What Happens Next in Your Story | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

At some point, all of us will hit a wall in our writing. We get stuck, we don't know what happens next, maybe we know where we need to go, but not sure how to get there.

 

Hitting a wall can feel a lot like writer's block. It can freak you out and make you panic. But most of the time, it's your subconscious telling you you're missing something you need to move forward.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Writing Exposition: 5 Helpful Techniques

Writing Exposition: 5 Helpful Techniques | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Exposition is one of the biggest challenges a young writer faces when trying to tackle a new script. What happened before the film started? What does the audience need to know to understand the story?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Marketing For Books

Marketing For Books | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

What makes a book sell? Obviously a good story that’s well written is going to be a big selling point, but once you have a finished product, what makes your well-written book sell better than my well-written book?

 

And what makes the other guy’s terribly-written book outsell both of us?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Show Your Setting through the POV Character’s Eyes

Show Your Setting through the POV Character’s Eyes | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Fiction writers—one of the fastest ways to bring your story world and characters to life is to portray the setting through the senses, feelings, reactions, and attitude of your protagonist.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Specifics Make Stories Real

Specifics Make Stories Real | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

In order for the reader to see your make believe world as clearly as you see it, you need to be specific.

 

This does not mean long descriptions or emphasising the way characters react to their environment. It means when you make a claim (it was an amazing library) or assign an emotion (she loved him), you have to back it up (what was so amazing about the library? What did she love about him?).

 

This is quite difficult, especially if you’re trying to avoid the clichés most commonly used.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Problems With Publishers

Problems With Publishers | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Publishers are very choosy about which books they consider worth publishing. It’s a very expensive business and so they have every right to choose only those books they believe will find a readership, and make them a profit.

 

That is certainly a reasonable position to take.

 

But, after their thorough and exhaustive selection process, of the books they decide are good enough, less than 10% actually make them any money.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to Start Your Novel

How to Start Your Novel | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Novels should begin with character and world building. You need to introduce the reader and let them explore your world a little before you can introduce the conflict of the main plot.

 

While it’s true you can take too long to intro­duce con­flict to your novel, with con­flict, there is such a thing as too much, too soon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to Write Effective Supporting Characters

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle gave Sherlock Holmes a full panoply of supporting characters. There was Dr. Watson, the quintessential “sidekick,” to act as a sounding board; Scottish landlady Mrs. Hudson, to cook and clean and fuss over Holmes; Scotland Yard Inspector LeStrade, to provide a foil for Holmes’ intuitive brilliance, as well as access to official investigations; the Baker Street Irregulars, to ferret out information; and Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock’s politically powerful older brother, to provide financial and strategic support. Like Doyle’s, your cast of supporting characters should reflect what your protagonist needs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Don't Write Boring Stories

Hmm. So maybe the plot is predictable. Maybe this passage . . . this scene . . . yeah, maybe this chapter and the last three have been rather steady. And flat. And steady. Did I already say that? It’s not that the action all sounds the same or the dialogue is a rehash of something from five chapters back. It’s just that . . .

 

Yeah, it’s boring.

 

So what are you doing wrong?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

First Look at a First Draft

First Look at a First Draft | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

You've just finished your first draft, and now it's time to polish. It's not a bad idea to stick the manuscript in a drawer (real or metaphorical) and walk away for two or three weeks, or even a month before you go back to it.

 

Now, I know this is sometimes hard because you're excited to have finished and you want to dive back in, but don't. To edit well you need distance, and to get distance, you need time away from your book. You want to see what's on the page, not what you remember writing. Approach the text with fresh eyes and you'll catch a lot more.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How important are plot layers to stories?

How important are plot layers to stories? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Many people may mistake a subplot and a layer. Maass has explained subplot as plot lines given to different characters while layers are plot lines given to the same character.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Novels Of the Future

Novels Of the Future | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

The three major forms of storytelling are books, television shows and movies. Books are the odd man out because they require active participation. You can sit back and let the story wash over you with a TV set or cinema screen. Books, you have to engage your faculties a little more actively.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Bring Your Descriptions to Life by Janice Hardy

5 Ways to Bring Your Descriptions to Life by Janice Hardy | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

When you think about it, everything in a book is description, because the author is describing an entire story to you. But when it gets down to the actual details of what’s in that story, it’s not uncommon for things to bog down into the minutia of what something looks like. Looks aren’t nearly as important as the reasons behind why that item is there to be seen in the first place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to develop conflict in your stories

How to develop conflict in your stories | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

We’ve often heard that conflict is the fuel that powers your story — and rightly so. Without conflict between characters, as well as waring elements within a single character, your stories are bound to appear staid and static — lacking dramatic impact and interest.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

7 Setting Basics That Can Bring a Story to Life

7 Setting Basics That Can Bring a Story to Life | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I love judging contests. I always appreciate the way reading entries forces me to evaluate the basics of good fiction writing. I come away from the experience working all the harder to apply the basics to my own stories.

more...
No comment yet.