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The whole world of writing in one place
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Writing Websites I'd Like To See

Writing Websites I'd Like To See | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

While there are a million websites, blogs and forums offering advice on writing, publishing and what to read, I feel there are some areas of the writing experience that are sorely underrepresented on the interwebs.

 

The following are some suggestion for anyone out there looking to start the next must-visit website for writers, but just can’t think of what to base it around.

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How to Make the Most of a Scene

How to Make the Most of a Scene | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I’m always looking for checklists to make sure I’m not missing anything while editing and revising. I hope you find it useful.

 

Whether we plot our stories ahead of time or write by the seat of our pants, we need to ensure our scenes are working as hard as they could be.

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Writing Is a War & Your Story Is a Trojan Horse

Writing Is a War & Your Story Is a Trojan Horse | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

As a writer, you are in a battle with your reader. You are the General in this little war, and your words are your soldiers. What are the spoils of war? That your reader is captivated by your story, moved to tears, horror, laughter or surprise.

 

But what are you fighting against? You and your writing is up against the reader’s doubts, and sometimes these defenses can be really strong. After all, why should they care what you have written? They may be skeptical of your work, new to your genre perhaps. Also, you are competing for their time. When a reader picks up your book, or looks at your website or your article, they are making a choice, to read that instead of doing something else. They need to be convinced that they want to keep on reading.

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Remembering Ray Bradbury with 11 Timeless Quotes

Remembering Ray Bradbury with 11 Timeless Quotes | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

What a tragic season it’s been for literary heroes who defined generations of readers and creators. Last month, we lost Maurice Sendak, and this week, Ray Bradbury — beloved author, champion of curiosity, relentless advocate of libraries — passed way at the age of 91. To celebrate his life and legacy, here are eleven of his most timeless insights on writing, culture, creativity, failure, happiness, and more.

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Killing Off A Character

Killing Off A Character | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Most novels begin with too many characters. Some writers, who have a knack for unusual cool character names, trot every one of them out in a novel's first chapter.

 

You're midway through your first draft and suddenly it hits you: your cast of thousands needs trimming. What are some things to think about if you need to kill off a character?

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A Good Scene Isn’t Written, It’s Dramatised

A Good Scene Isn’t Written, It’s Dramatised | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Every scene has a purpose. Once you know that purpose, and you make sure the scene fulfils that purpose, job done, right?

 

Not quite.

 

If a man is needs money and he goes to an ATM and gets some cash, and the purpose of the scene is to get him from broke to not broke, then what you have is a dull scene.

 

Whether you tell me about him getting his money, or you show me him getting his money, it will be just as dull either way.

 

What the scene lacks isn’t purpose or clarity or action or a character with a goal, what it lacks is drama.

 

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To Outline, or Not To Outline, That is the Question

To Outline, or Not To Outline, That is the Question | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Outliners, at least in popular thought, tend to be control freaks, tight, anxious, did I mention the issue with control?

 

Non-outliners tend to be casual, loose, free and easy.

 

Now, in most of my personal habits and traits I am laid back, laissez-faire, some might even call me lazy. (I never met an excuse to take the day off that I didn't like.) Just like a non-outliner.

 

So you would probably assume that I'm a non-outliner.

You would assume wrong.

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How Does Your Character React?

How Does Your Character React? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I’ve spent quite a few days mulling over this very question. In order to make my protagonist believable, I need him to react and emote in a believable way. Being the logical chap that I am, I broke the reactions into sections and scoured some of my favorite books for ideas.

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6 Ways to Never Run Out of Ideas

6 Ways to Never Run Out of Ideas | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

The key to never running out of writing ideas has more to do with overhauling your lifestyle than changing how you write. Most writers have all of the ideas they need. Here are six practices that will help you capture and develop your writing ideas.

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Why Skimping on Macro Editing Could Cost You Readers

Why Skimping on Macro Editing Could Cost You Readers | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I like to refer to the macro edit stage as rewriting. I think the term sufficiently sums up the entire process, which involves analyzing the big picture elements of our stories and rewriting, adding, or deleting major parts in order to make the story more appealing to readers.

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Key-Word Cavalry: Four Temperaments

Key-Word Cavalry: Four Temperaments | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Two weeks ago, L Diane Wolfe mentioned the four basic character traits: choleric, sanguine, phlegmatic and melancholic. So... since it might draw some search results, I thought I'd write a post exploring them a bit, even though I don't really build my characters like that based on their psychological profiles.

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6 Reasons to Try Writing Exercises

When you have a manuscript you're working on, it can be easy to assume writing exercises will just take away valuable time from that WIP. Why waste a thousand words on random things when you really need to get that scene down with the alligator and the microwave?

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Moving Forward: Writing Smooth Transitions

Moving Forward: Writing Smooth Transitions | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I'm a bit of a stickler for transitions. When I'm reading, I like to go smoothly from one thought to the next and one scene to another. If the prose is too choppy, it jars me out of the story and I have difficulty getting back into it.

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To Kill or Not to Kill…That is The Question

To Kill or Not to Kill…That is The Question | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Working through critique notes can be tough. Not only do we have to read through them with an open, objective mind, we also have to absorb them. Swallow them whole bit by bit then regurgitate by making the necessary changes based on both the feedback, and what our gut tells us. Describing it that way isn’t pretty, is it? Nope. And neither is realizing you might need to cut an entire scene.

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The Good Seed III by Donald Maass

The Good Seed III by Donald Maass | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

You know how in relationships everything you need to know was, in retrospect, revealed in the first twenty-four hours? It’s the same in pitch sessions. Everything important is revealed in the first twenty-four seconds.

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What Is the Story Behind Your Story?

What Is the Story Behind Your Story? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Ted Gup gave me lots of great writ­ing advice when I was in his cre­ative non­fic­tion class in grad school. Write through to the end; don’t edit as you go. Don’t talk about what you’re writ­ing because that steals the life from it. Be care­ful about par­rot­ing yourself.

But by far the best wis­dom he ever shared with me was this, “Look for the story behind the story.”

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5 Ways to Explore Your Story

5 Ways to Explore Your Story | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I am still in the early stages of feeling my way through the new SHARK story. I am doing some exploratory writing. These are writings that I don’t expect to make it into the book, I am just feeling my way around the character, the setting and the voice.

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How to Establish Story-Context from the Get-Go

How to Establish Story-Context from the Get-Go | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

By clearly establishing a before and after, a writer is able to emphasize the transforming effect of the Hero’s actions on the world around her — the amount of change that this world undergoes by the end of the story is precisely the measure of success that the Hero has achieved in acquiring the goal. How do we go about sketching in the main features of this world quickly and efficiently?

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Five Questions to Ask before Querying Agents

Five Questions to Ask before Querying Agents | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Sometimes, agent querying is the very best next step to publication–sometimes, though, querying isn’t the route that will lead to the most success in publication. Before spending hours and hours writing and sending out hundreds of queries, take a few minutes to ask yourself the following five questions:

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How Inspiration Is Killing You & What To Do About It

How Inspiration Is Killing You & What To Do About It | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Throughout our life we will meet many creative people. Not just writers, but artists, musicians, and craftsman of various trades. We are all on a common quest to achieve some degree of creative perfection, brilliance or success.

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Fill in the Blanks: A Plot Template to Keep you on Target

Fill in the Blanks: A Plot Template to Keep you on Target | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Last week I shared some great plotting tips from Southpark creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. I've been using them myself as I revise, but I couldn't stop thinking of other ways to apply this technique. I was also thinking about something a commenter said, and how this applied to the bigger marco issues, not just in the smaller goal-driving aspects. I was working on a blog post for that when it hit me.

 

This could make a really cool plot template.

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Didn't See That Coming

Didn't See That Coming | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I think that’s the finest compliment an author can get from a reader: I didn’t see that coming.

 

Surprising the reader is not easy. First, you have to give the reader a sense of where you’re heading – without being so predictable they stop reading – then pull the rug out from under them at a critical moment.

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Six Writers Tell All About Covers and Blurbs

Six Writers Tell All About Covers and Blurbs | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Writers by definition spend a lot of time on the inside of books, which is why what happens on the outside—namely, cover art and blurbs—can feel precarious and daunting. Often these elements are beyond an author’s control or expertise, which can be painful to admit, particularly when the "expertise" of graphic designers and marketers seems so subjective or at odds with an author’s “vision” for a book.

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Can You Be Trusted To Tell A Good Story?

Can You Be Trusted To Tell A Good Story? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Or, to put it another way, would you want to read a story by someone who doesn’t know what they're talking about?

 

Me neither.

 

In fact, even if someone sounds like they don’t know what they’re talking about, that’s enough to turn off most people. They don’t want to read that guy’s story, or listen to his views, or spend any time in his presence.

 

When it comes to communicating with people, especially people you don't know personally, to ‘sound like’ you know what you’re talking about is more important than actually knowing what you’re talking about.

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