The Funnily Enough
Follow
Find
34.3K views | +12 today
The Funnily Enough
The whole world of writing in one place
Curated by mooderino
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Kitchen Sink That First Draft

Kitchen Sink That First Draft | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Lists of writing tips are always popular (and sometimes overdone), but Josh Swiller’s 12 tips in the latest Glimmer Train bulletin are a delight to read. Two of my favorite tips, directly quoted:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Structuring Act I, etc.

Structuring Act I, etc. | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

In his book, The Screenwriter’s Workbook, Syd Field reminds us that the first act of any story is a block of dramatic action, which begins on page one, is inflected by the inciting incident within the first half of the act, and ends at the first turning point. The primary function of the first act is to set up the dramatic context for the entire story, introduce the protagonist as well as other important characters, their world, and the goal – that which the protagonist must achieve in order to save the day, restore the balance, fulfill his or her potential.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How Nitpicky Do We Need to Be With Our Manuscripts?

How Nitpicky Do We Need to Be With Our Manuscripts? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Recently I received an email from Shelly wondering how nitpicky agents and editors are with manuscripts. She asked: When it comes to grammar, how perfect do writers need to be? Obviously we need to look and sound like we know what we are doing and not come across as amateurs, but how nitpicky are agents/editors/publishers? Will this factor in for whether you are considered for publication or not?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to write the climax to a novel

An ending has to accomplish several things: it has to complete the story, it must offer resolution, it should tie up all loose ends and, finally, it should provide an ending that is logical and satisfactory.

 

It’s worth noting that not all stories need to end in one explosive, violent event - and there is nothing wrong with that – because many novels don’t. Some novels – literary ones in particular – have more of a gentle ‘unveiling’ at the end, whether that’s the unravelling life-journey of a character, or the answer to a particular plot twist or a simple revelation etc – as long as the story is resolved.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Conflict and Suspense Belong in Every Kind of Novel

Conflict and Suspense Belong in Every Kind of Novel | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

What is the goal of the novel? Is it to entertain? Teach? Preach? Stir up anger? Change the world? Make the author a lot of money?

 

It can be any of these things, but in the end, none of these objectives will work to their full potential unless they forge, in some way, a satisfying emotional experience for the reader.

 

And what gets the reader hooked emotionally? Trouble. Readers are gripped by the terrible trials a character goes through.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How Will Your Book Get Discovered in The Roiling Sea of Digital Publishing?

How Will Your Book Get Discovered in The Roiling Sea of Digital Publishing? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Ah yes, this is the question of 2012 for authors (and traditional publishers, for that matter). Last year the question was, Should I self-publish? That question has been answered with, Only if you want an additional stream of income and a growing platform.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Think Like A Doctor: Diagnose And Cure What Ails Your Book

Think Like A Doctor: Diagnose And Cure What Ails Your Book | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

One of the most important skills you can have as a writer is the ability to detach yourself from your work and diagnose its weaknesses objectively—as if you were a doctor examining a patient.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Ax Your Cliches: Why and How

At one time every cliché was fresh. Maybe clever. Sometimes funny.

The first time someone wrote or said it, it was fresh. Now, not so much.

 

If you’ve read a sentence a dozen times, or twenty dozen times, or every which way but Sunday, it is as boring as it is annoying.

Clichés are old hat. Clichés are yesterday’s news. Clichés are been there, done that.

 

Clichés are scummy water under a broken-down bridge.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Guilt-Free Creativity: Stop Kicking Yourself & Start Producing

Guilt-Free Creativity: Stop Kicking Yourself & Start Producing | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

We've all been there: You finally carve out the time to work on a big creative project and then you... choke. After counting on this break to really produce something, you're suddenly paralyzed by performance anxiety. But instead of showing up as fear on the surface, it manifests itself as guilt. If you don't proceed with caution, you can soon fritter away your creative fortune on nickel and dime activities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Just Say No To Melodrama

Just Say No To Melodrama | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Unfortunately, many writers make the mistake of assuming that to be gripping, emotion must be dramatic. Sad people should burst into tears. Joyful characters must express their glee by jumping up and down. This kind of writing results in melodrama, which leads to a sense of disbelief in the reader because, in real life, emotion isn’t always so demonstrative.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Building Deep Conflict into Novel Structure

If I am working on a novel, and my plot in essence consists of someone saying to the mc, "here, do this," and the character says, "sure, no problem," then runs through a bunch of obstacles, maybe even dangerous obstacles, I as then I, the author, am the one with a serious problem. I haven't given my mc a strong enough reason to push back against the events unfolding. And adding conflict once the novel is written isn't as easy as it sounds, because what ultimately makes for the kind of book that I, personally, want to read, is deep conflict. That's what makes me care about a book and keeps me turning pages late into the night.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Write Tighter, Write Smarter

Write Tighter, Write Smarter | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Recently, I came across those notebooks of my first attempts at writing a novel and was shocked to see what my style was like when I wrote it eight years ago. I think the aspect that struck me the most was how much I rambled.

 

It wasn't that I wrote endless chapters of setting or backstory or dialogue. My problem was that I wrote the way I spoke--and I spoke with a lot of extra words.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Secondary Characters Have a Life of Their Own

Secondary Characters Have a Life of Their Own | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

We all need a supporting cast in our novels. Secondary characters have to be in there, unless your book is about a guy stuck on a deserted island the entire time. But even in that instance, an animal or even a volleyball can play the role of a secondary character. There are plenty of great movies where even the hero is an animal. But whether your secondary characters are human, feline, canine, or bovine, they need to be fully human in their characteristics (well, maybe cats can getting away with just saying no).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

25 Ways To Get Your Creative Groove Back As A Writer

25 Ways To Get Your Creative Groove Back As A Writer | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Sometimes, writers get out of the groove. They lose their voodoo. This isn’t just writer’s block — hell, you might even still be writing. But it feels hollow, unrewarding, like it’s not just giving back what you put in.

 

You need your creative mojo back.

 

Which means, another list of 25, comin’ right up.

 

(Some of these, I figure, also work toward writer’s block, if that’s a thing you believe in.)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Story Structure is Simple

Story Structure is Simple | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Sure, a story needs a Beginning, Middle and End, but apart from that what else do you need to build a satisfying and effective story structure?

 

The answer is simple: Nothing.

 

In the same way that the four building blocks of DNA enable the creation of all life on Earth, so B, M and E, if positioned, combined and repeated correctly, can produce an endless variety of story.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Structure Part 2–Plot Problems

Structure Part 2–Plot Problems | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

By the end of this series, I hope you to give you guys all the tools you need to be “structure experts.”Yes, even the pantsers.

If you are planning to do the National Novel Writing Month Challenge (50,000 words in the month of November) then these lessons will help you tremendously. If you are going to put in that much effort, wouldn’t it be great to have something worthwhile at the end of the month?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Exploring the Horror Genre

Exploring the Horror Genre | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Horror is apparently on the rise in fiction. Or something? I don't know, people say weird things about trends! But as such, I thought today I could talk about the various types of horror! Because not all horror is created equal, you know. Also Halloween is coming up and stuff.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

What Fantasy Writers Can Learn From Horror

What Fantasy Writers Can Learn From Horror | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

As an advocate of genre-mixing, I’m drawn to horror from the direction of fantasy. One discusses our dreams, and the other our nightmares, but the two sometimes call upon surprisingly similar techniques.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How To Be Incredible

How To Be Incredible | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

You are, of course, a special person. You have many talents and skills. Of course you also have weaknesses—everyone does—but your strengths count for much more. However, if being special is not good enough for you. If you want to be more than special, if you want to be incredible, you can. But you need to work at it. If being incredible were too easy, everyone would do it. On the other hand, it is not impossible. So, get to it!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Self-Publishing:--Is It for You? Four Writers Share Their Experiences with Releasing Their Own Books

Self-Publishing:--Is It for You? Four Writers Share Their Experiences with Releasing Their Own Books | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

It used to be called "vanity press," but now it's looking like a good deal for many writers.  Why?  What are the pitfalls and the benefits of publishing yourself?  Why are so many writers considering it a great option these days?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

The 11 Key Questions Every Indie Author Must Know about the Competition

The 11 Key Questions Every Indie Author Must Know about the Competition | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

The number one secret of bestselling authors: knowing what’s already in the market. The questions below are things to consider as you research competing titles. In the business world, this is known as a competitive analysis. Your answers to the following questions will not only help strengthen your vision, but will help you create the book that will stand out from the pack.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Characters Don't Know What Other Characters Think

You may be writing paranormals and so, yes, you might have a mind-reading character or two in your fiction. But if you’re not and if you don’t, then it’s likely your characters are no better at reading the minds and emotions of other characters than any of us are at reading the 3-dimensional people in our lives.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Day After Day After Day—Showing Up At The Page No Matter What

Day After Day After Day—Showing Up At The Page No Matter What | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

There is a point in every novel I write where I am utterly miserable. The book is a big mess, full of TKs (“to come”) and notes to myself (“fix this in line with Chapter 22”), sloppy writing and dull characterization. It feels like it will never, ever be finished, and even if it is, it will be the biggest pile of manure to yet arrive on the literary scene.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Rules, Schmules: Don't Follow the Rules, Tell a Great Story

Rules, Schmules: Don't Follow the Rules, Tell a Great Story | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

This might sound odd on a blog that is dedicated to ways to improve your writing, but if you're more concerned with the technical rules of writing than the story itself, you're hurting your chances of ever getting published.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to Avoid the Blank Page

How to Avoid the Blank Page | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

In his book,The Screenwriter’s Workbook, Syd Field mentions that the great Irish writer, James Joyce, once said that writing is like climbing a mountain. When ascending the rock-face, all you can see is the surface directly in front and behind you. You can’t see where you’re going or where you’ve come from. Writing is a little like that. All you can see is the page you’re immediately working on.

more...
No comment yet.