The Funnily Enough
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The whole world of writing in one place
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How NOT to Bore the Reader

How NOT to Bore the Reader | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Descriptions, characterization, dialogue... how do you know when you're boring the reader?


Good question! We certainly don't want to bore our readers. The last thing we want - dare I say our nightmare - is to have the reader put the book down, unread. *shudders*

 

Here are some tips we can use to keep the momentum going, and the reader hooked!

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Write a 5-Star Chapter One

As an aspiring author, the prospect of writing Chapter One should not intimidate, but excite the hell out of you. Why? Because no other part of your book can provide you with the disproportionate payoff that an excellent first chapter can. Far more than a great query letter, a great Chapter One can attract the attention of an agent. It can keep a harried editor from yawning and hitting “delete.” It can make a bookstore browser keep turning pages during the slow walk to the cash registers. And yes, it can even keep a bleary-eyed owner of one of those electronic thingamajigs touching the screen for more, more, more!

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Ways Writers Procrastin... Recharge

Ways Writers Procrastin... Recharge | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Science fair projects, finals week, Christmas shopping, choir and orchestra concerts, parties—have you noticed how December is the month when everyone tries to cram in twice as many activities and to-do’s as usual? Lest you feel too productive this month, let me share with you a few of my favorite ways to procrastinate recharge when the weather outside is frightful and the days are short and you feel like you’re trying to live two lives simultaneously!

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Fear of editors

Fear of editors | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Are you a writer who worries about working with a developmental editor for fear of losing control over the project? If so, you’re not the only one. Here's some advice.

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Need to Create? Get a Constraint

Need to Create? Get a Constraint | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

It's not until we encounter an unexpected hurdle that the chains of cognition are loosened, and we experience newfound access to creativity. Frontal Cortex blogger Jonah Lehrer explains why.

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Proofreading Techniques Every Talented Writer Should Know

Professional proofreaders use a number of proofreading techniques in order to produce the most polished and error-free results for their clients. These methods allow them to maintain their concentration on the material while ensuring that it is thoroughly checked for mistakes and necessary corrections. By adopting these proofreading techniques, authors and small business owners can improve the quality of their written communications.

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How Does a Writer Plot Successfully?

A plot sparks, ignites, and finally explodes in the closing scenes, or it should, if you’re doing your job. The story shouldn’t just spark and ignite only to fizzle out. It needs a constant increase in tension. Options for your characters must continue to disappear—especially when your character needs them the most—only to have the story end with a logical conclusion.

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“Theme”… Simplified.

Separate your plot from your theme. Don’t try to make them the same thing. Yes, it’s good if they can connect, or at least don’t get in each other’s way, but in terms of your focus just worry about your conceptually-driven plot for a moment. And then...

 

… because that’s a story… set it within a thematic microcosm. Or, back to the metaphor, stage it upon a landscape that is inherently thematic.

 

Stage a story on the Titanic, and by definition you’re writing a story about facing impending death. Could be a love story (warning: it’s been done), a crime story, a corruption story, a religious story… doesn’t matter. If it takes place on The Titanic, you’re already thematic.

 

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10 Easy Ways to Improve Your Dialogue

Many writers list "dialogue" as one of the key things they struggle with. Here are 10 easy ways to improve your dialogue.

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Story vs Plot

Story vs Plot | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Aren't these just two ways to say the same thing? Does it really matter if you don't know the difference?

 

On a very basic level STORY is what happens and PLOT is how it happens.

 

The suggestion being that plot provides a deliberate causal relationship between events that tells the reader the reasons for what happened, and what it means in a wider context. This is all very well but how does it help you to be a better storyteller?

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Character Rants

Use character rants and breakdowns to reveal a character's personality, to allow characters to say what they've been too afraid or too embarrassed or too polite to say.

 

Characters who explode—in rage or grief or fear—give themselves a release as well as providing a release for the reader.

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Anatomy of a Good Hook

Anatomy of a Good Hook | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

If you’re writing a novel (and if you’re reading this, you probably are), there are a few key words and phrases you’re more than a little likely to be familiar with. But there’s one thing we stress over like no other because so much rests on its small and elusive shoulders, one thing that if we don’t get it right, renders the rest of our work irrelevant because it likely won’t get read: the hook.

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The 7 Deadly Sins of Writing

The 7 Deadly Sins of Writing | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

In a thought-provoking panel, four popular authors shared what they believe to be the deadly sins of the writing craft. Have you committed any of them?

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Connecting Story Threads

Connecting story threads is a sure way to write full, satisfying, and cohesive stories. Familiarize yourself with ways to weave story elements together.

 

Connect your story beginnings to the endings. Write the ending that matches the beginning. And write the opening that will lead to the ending you want to portray

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How Critiquing For Someone Else Will Make Your Book Better

How Critiquing For Someone Else Will Make Your Book Better | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

When reading someone else's writing, I see what they've told me - not what they've got in their head. By reading other people's writing a lot I started being able pick out what writers were intending as opposed to what they were actually communicating.

And it showed me how I do the same thing.

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Movie Binge December

Movie Binge December | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I've been watching a lot of movies recently so I thought I'd do a review post. I should point out that I saw none of these films in 3D (which may or may not explain some of my views).

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Writability: 10 Writing Truths (Part 1)

Writability: 10 Writing Truths (Part 1) | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

1. Rewriting really means rewriting. This one took me a long time to learn. I used to think that by rewriting, authors couldn’t possibly mean actually rewriting the entire novel. You mean that first draft was just a practice round? I actually have to relive the whole thing and write these scenes over and over again, scrapping what I first had?

 

In short? Yes. Yes you do. Sure, depending on how tight and polished your first draft is, some writers will have a larger percentage of first draft material in the final draft than others, but by and large rewriting means exactly what it sounds like. Write it again.

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Getting the Characters "In"

Juggling a large cast of characters is a difficult task. How do you keep your reader from getting confused, or lost in all the names? What if you have to introduce a lot of new characters very rapidly? How do you make sure that each one has a distinct presence within your story?

 

We talked about this in one of my writing classes once, and my professor said it all boiled down to getting a character "in."

 

"In" what, exactly? Well, jammed in the brain of the reader, of course. And no matter how many people you throw into the equation, that character never gets lost, because you have established them in a strong way, even if they are a minor character.

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Emo MCs

Emo MCs | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

How do you find that balance between emotional motivation/inner conflict for your main character and not going too emo? It has to do with story tone and genre too but here are some tips.

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No Subtext Without Context

No Subtext Without Context | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

In order to create a story that resonates and affects people on more than a superficial level, you need more going on than appears to be going on.

 

For subtext to work you need two things:

1. There must be a clear and plausible reason for why a character does something.

2. That reason is not the true reason they’re doing it.

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