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The Funnily Enough
The whole world of writing in one place
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Seek & Destroy Word List #2

Seek & Destroy Word List #2 | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

If you're working on ways to tighten your prose without changing the storyline, doing a find and replace on the following words and phrases will help lower your wordcount and streamline your read:

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Tips on Writing: Building Momentum

Tips on Writing: Building Momentum | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I often tell people that writing every day is an excellent way to build momentum.

And then they look at me blankly and wonder why in the hell they need momentum, since they are writers, not rocket engineers.

 

I tell them (and I'm telling you now) that momentum is what gets the novel (or memoir, or article, or any writing project) done.

 

So, what exactly is momentum?

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Don't Give Characters What They Want

We all know what children are like when they’re denied a treat or something they’ve been looking forward to—they fuss and fume and then they stomp off angry or disappointed or both.

And adults who are denied either plot ways to get what they want by another method or they’re plotting revenge against the individual responsible for the denial.

 

You can manipulate your characters—even the sweetest, most agreeable ones—into heinous behavior by denying them what they most want.

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On Logos, Arrows, and Storytelling

On Logos, Arrows, and Storytelling | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

We can blame my brother for sending me off on this tangent--but I'm glad he did. You see, he's the one that mentioned it first.

 

"Have you ever seen the arrow in the FedEx logo?" he asked. And that's when the adventure began.

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“Scheherazade”

“Scheherazade” | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

1. Who wants what?

 

2. What happens if s/he doesn’t get it?

 

3.What HAS to happen next?

 

Answer these three questions truthfully and you’ll be able to tell very quickly whether your scene works as drama or not.

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Writing Without Too Much On The Nose

Writing Without Too Much On The Nose | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Story shouldn’t be obvious or predictable. Nobody enjoys being told about things that just happen in a nice convenient fashion, no matter how realistic and lifelike it might be. Don’t write on-the-nose.

 

On the other hand, story shouldn’t be vague or obtuse. Nobody enjoys being confused or bored, no matter how brilliantly the baffling events of Chapter One are explained in Chapter Sixteen. Don’t write wishy-washy.

 

Don’t be obvious. Don’t be vague. So what does that leave?

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Harry Potter and the Three Types of Heroes

Harry Potter and the Three Types of Heroes | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

JK Rowling’s journey with Harry Potter began, apparently, when Harry walked, fully formed onto her London bound train. She knew immediately she had been given a brilliant idea for a book. However, it still took her five years to brainstorm and write the rest. Which goes to show that while the hero might be the central character of the book, if you only have him or her, you don’t have much.

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Writer Self-Esteem & #Writemotivation Part 1

Writer Self-Esteem & #Writemotivation Part 1 | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

As writers, especially aspiring authors who have no real way of validating what we do, self-esteem is often a painful hurdle. I’m not talking about looking in the mirror and knowing you have to lose a few pounds, or wishing your hair was a different colour, or simply hating the way you think others see you. What I’m talking about is writing self-esteem.

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25 Things Writers Should Start Doing

25 Things Writers Should Start Doing | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

1. Start Taking Yourself Seriously

This is a real thing, this writing thing, if you let it be. It’s not just about money or publication — it’s about telling the kind of stories only you can tell. Few others are going to take you seriously, so give them a 21-middle-finger-salute and do for yourself what they won’t: demonstrate some self-respect.

 

2. Start Taking The Time...

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Why Reader Taste Differs from Publisher Taste

Why Reader Taste Differs from Publisher Taste | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

When publishers “run numbers” to decide how much money they can spend on a book, a big part of the process comes down to comparing the book to another that’s similar and then factoring in the sales figures of said book. Sound unscientific? You betcha. But in many cases, they don’t have much more to go on—and with so little to go on, publishers really do have to rely on marketing hooks in their decision-making.

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Hooks, Loglines, and Pitches: What Every Writer Needs to Know

If one of your New Year’s resolutionsis to start sending that masterpiece out into the marketplace, you’re going to run into words like “hook,” “logline,” and “pitch.” The terms come from the film industry, but they’re becoming standard in publishing as well.So what do they mean? Are they just sexy terms for a synopsis?

 

Not exactly. The distinctions often blur, but here are the basics:

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Poking Dead Scenes With A Stick, Part One

Poking Dead Scenes With A Stick, Part One | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Revisions aren't for weaklings. They're hard, they take commitment, and sometimes you have to make the tough call. One such call is deciding the fate of a scene that isn't pulling its weight. It's not advancing the plot or story, and you know there's a problem with it. Do you cut it or try to save it? Today, let's look at those scenes that gotta go.

 

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“Write What You Know” Does Not Mean What You Think It Does

“Write What You Know” Does Not Mean What You Think It Does | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

If you’ve ever read anything about writing, chances are that at some stage you’ll have encountered the maxim that you should ‘write what you know’. It’s at this point that some writers will throw up their hands and declare that nothing interesting ever happens to them, so what can they possibly write about? It can also lead you into dangerous territory if you decide to turn real events into fiction – if you don’t disguise your characters well enough, it can land you in hot water with the real life protagonists if they don’t come out of the fiction in a positive light. So how on earth can you navigate this treacherous terrain and write about what you know without upsetting, or boring, anyone?

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4 Writing Routines You Can Live With

4 Writing Routines You Can Live With | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

I like schedules.

 

I remember at one point in my life actually managing to, say, go running, teach six classes, make a meatloaf, and get some writing done all on the same day.

 

But lately, with a toddler and newborn in the house, “scheduling” mostly means just ensuring that everybody eats and sleeps at predictable times. It might sound clear-cut, but the stakes are high; after all, I’m always hovering one poorly timed peanut-butter-and-jelly-sandwich-with-carrot-sticks lunch away from a meltdown.

 

So when to write?

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Similes and Metaphors That WORK

Similes and Metaphors That WORK | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

One thing I love about writing is using figures of speech such as similes and metaphors. Doing this well is important--and I'm still learning how to do it.

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How to make good writing great

How to make good writing great | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

You're probably sick of hearing that good writing requires well-drawn characters, exhilarating plots, conflict on every page and lots at stake - but that's really like saying what makes a great pizza is flour, eggs and tomato - we all know it takes a little more than that. Besides, a cursory analysis of what readers really like (i.e. what they keep buying) is a heady combination of story, romance and milieu.

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6 Signs of Description Misuse

There are many ways to use and abuse description in fiction. There are the obvious ways of simply over doing it, and the less obvious ways. Below I've listed the six signs to keep a look out for.

 

1. The Shopping Lists.

 

2. If the Action Stops.

 

3. The Tell.

 

4. The Wall.

 

5. The Clichés and the Stereotypes.

 

6. The Lack of Relevance.

 

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Seeing Creative: Weaving in Symbolism

Seeing Creative: Weaving in Symbolism | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Subtext works both at a conscious and unconscious level. When we read a book or watch a movie, some symbols will jump out at us, especially if the creators have done a good job drawing your attention to it. With other symbols, you won’t stop to analyze it. For example, if the scene takes place in a room with green walls, you won’t be thinking that the director wanted to reveal the subtext of life. But you can guarantee someone behind the scenes purposely picked that color because of what it symbolized and not because it was her favorite color.

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Lindsay Doran Examines What Makes Films Satisfying

Lindsay Doran Examines What Makes Films Satisfying | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

“What shocked us,” said Dan Lin, a producer of the Sherlock Holmes films whose team recently watched a Doran presentation, “were Lindsay’s points about what audiences care about most — relationships and the positive resolution of those relationships. We had previously thought what was most important was the lead character winning at the end of the movie.”

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It's Alive! Poking Dead Scenes With A Stick, Part Two

It's Alive! Poking Dead Scenes With A Stick, Part Two | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

If you've decided to keep a dead scene, then there's something about that scene that matters to the story and can't be moved any other place. Or, you just really love it and want to find a way to make it work. Either way, the solution is the same.

Make that scene do more things for the story.

 

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The Joys of Rewriting

The Joys of Rewriting | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

There are some people who love getting an idea down on paper, and that’s it, they’re done. The concept of going over it again and again is anathema to them. Nothing could seem more tedious and uncreative. But there's no writing without rewriting.

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7 Ways Learning to Draw Can Improve Your Productivity

7 Ways Learning to Draw Can Improve Your Productivity | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

What if the principles of drawing could help you to become more productive in other areas of your life.

 

Would you give it a try?

 

Feel the fear, and draw it anyway.

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Five Productivity Tips

Five Productivity Tips | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

People often ask me how I can get so much done. So I’m going to share with you a few of the strategies I’ve learned since I’ve been writing professionally.

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