The Funnily Enough
Follow
Find
46.7K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by mooderino
onto The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

22 Productivity Tricks and Tools You Love

22 Productivity Tricks and Tools You Love | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

Last week we asked you to share your favorite tips and tools for getting things done. Tons of what we can only assume are super-organized, task-master Riot readers chimed in, and five lucky participants won copies of the book.

 

Here are 22 of the best productivity tricks and tools you love.

more...
No comment yet.
The Funnily Enough
The whole world of writing in one place
Curated by mooderino
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Maximising Want-To-Know Value

Maximising Want-To-Know Value | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
When someone is reading a story they are assigning a value to what they are reading. This value can be anywhere from ‘I have absolutely no interest in this’ to ‘I have to know what happens next, sleep be damned’. Obviously you want them to be nearer one end of the scale than the other.

While it’s impossible to have a story where the reader’s engagement is turned up all the way to 11 from beginning to end, there are ways to help you get the most out of a scene, no matter what the premise might be.

Action, conversation, or even a familiar set up that’s been written about a zillion times before— they can all be vastly improved if the reader actively wants to know what’s going on. And there are ways you can help nudge them in that direction.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Create a Warm, Low Light Workspace to Boost Creativity

Create a Warm, Low Light Workspace to Boost Creativity | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
It’s no secret that your environment can affect your creativity. If you’re sitting at your brightly lit desk in a chilly office, listening to loud music, and wondering why your next flash of genius isn’t coming to you, try swapping that environment for a warm, softly lit room. Maybe even put on some moderate ambient noise.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

3 Screenwriting Tricks to Help You Improve Your Writing

3 Screenwriting Tricks to Help You Improve Your Writing | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Even if you love the printed word, there’s something magic about cinema. How it happens is somewhat of a mystery—even for those involved in the production process. What’s even more amazing is how a writer can create the likes of Tony Soprano, Walter White, and Holly Golightly from a few lines of dialogue and sparse stage directions. To be sure, credit must be given to the director and actors involved, but a good character and a good story begins with good writing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Get a Handle on Writer Insecurity

Get a Handle on Writer Insecurity | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
We writers tend to be an insecure bunch. We’re plagued with doubts and uncertainties, always questioning our abilities. Sometimes we’re so neurotic, it’s a wonder we accomplish anything!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

The Heart of a Story: What Is It, Where Is It, and How Do You Get There?

The Heart of a Story: What Is It, Where Is It, and How Do You Get There? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Scan the Table of Contents in most writing manuals and you’ll see the familiar menu of story mechanics. All good! Setting, characters, plot points and pillars, crisis, climax and resolution—without these ingredients we probably don’t have a fully-cooked story. But one essential is almost always missing—the heart of a story.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to Craft Characters Scene by Scene

How to Craft Characters Scene by Scene | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
The fact that scenes can open up a character in a unique and powerful way exposes a simple, fundamental truth: Characters reveal themselves more vividly in what they do and say than in what they think and feel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

The Other Senses

The Other Senses | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
When writing a story, using the senses to make scenes more vivid and visceral is simple and obvious advice. You want the reader to feel like they’re right there with the characters, experiencing what they’re experiencing.

Using what the characters see, hear, smell, touch and taste will further reader engagement, but these are not the only senses people have. There are in fact a host of other senses that are often overlooked or are so abstract that it isn’t clear how to convey them on the page.

A simple google search will produce a list of senses other than the big five, but it isn’t enough to be aware of them, or to be able to define them. You want to be able to capture the feeling in a way that the reader will relate to, and relate to strongly.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

The Incredible Eccentricities of 20 Great Writers

The Incredible Eccentricities of 20 Great Writers | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Truly great artists will do whatever it takes to find their muse.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Find Out if Your Prologue Is Destroying Your Story’s Subtext

Find Out if Your Prologue Is Destroying Your Story’s Subtext | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
You hear it all the time: prologues are evil. (And writers everywhere, commence howling.) Now I’ll grant that “evil” is a slight exaggeration. We might call them “dangerous” instead, except that word is pretty ironic, since one of the chief reasons a prologue is so dangerous is because it allows authors to play it waaaaay yonder too safe.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Multidimensional Conflict

Multidimensional Conflict | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
I used to confuse conflict with action. In film, we decipher conflict from dialogue and character’s actions and reactions. In writing we have the added dimension of thought. We can introduce the reader to conflicts through our characters in an intimate way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Beware the Vague Goal When Outlining a Scene

Beware the Vague Goal When Outlining a Scene | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Vague goals are nobody’s friend. They creep into our scenes, make us think our structures (and stories) are solid, but they’re really undermining those stories, especially in the drafting stage.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Don’t Abandon Your Broken Book – Five Life Savers For Desperate Authors

Don’t Abandon Your Broken Book – Five Life Savers For Desperate Authors | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Sometimes things don’t work out the way we want them to. In life, we put up with this – we bear the disappointments, we try something new, we get over it. 

When writing a book, it’s different – we know that we can find a way to make it work.  Why? Simple reason: as the author we have complete control over the story world. We’re not lying on the operating table – we’re the surgeon with the cool brow and gleaming little scalpel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

The Zen of Organized Writing: 5 Steps You Can Take Today

The Zen of Organized Writing: 5 Steps You Can Take Today | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
How can you organize your life as a writer so you can spend more time writing?

What’s the best way to manage writing alongside other projects?

Why is it so hard to balance the act of writing with the day-to-day demands of life?

I think you’ll agree most writers have to achieve more than write every day–we have to do things like plan our research, market our writing, find a quiet place to work.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Writing Basics: The Act Two Choice

Writing Basics: The Act Two Choice | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
After the inciting event has occurred, and the protagonist is faced with the story question of the act one problem, it’s time to make a choice and launch act two.

The act two choice is the transitional moment, linking the beginning and the middle. The protagonist chooses to embrace whatever problem he’s confronted with, and accepts the opportunity it offers to resolve that problem. How he decides to deal with that problem establishes how the plot is going to unfold throughout the middle of the novel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How To Uncover Your Character’s Emotional Wound

How To Uncover Your Character’s Emotional Wound | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
To build a compelling character (and write them convincingly) we want to make them real as possible, and that means developing a backstory that lets us understand them on a deeper level. This brainstorming time allows us create their unique personality by seeing how the people and events of their past helped to shape them. Knowing who and what influenced a character gives us insight into what they might fear, desire, and need most of all. With these key pieces of information, we will know what motivates them, which in turn dictates their reactions, responses and behaviors in the story.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Stuck on a Scene? Just Say No.

Stuck on a Scene? Just Say No. | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Whenever I'm stuck on a scene, I return to the basics. I look at the goals, conflict, stakes, and if that doesn't fix the problem, I look at the structure itself. Classic scene structure ends in two ways: the protagonist gets her goal, or she doesn’t get her goal. The answer is yes or no.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to Double Your Readers with This Significant Strategy

How to Double Your Readers with This Significant Strategy | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

n the endless sea of textbooks, essays and lectures, there are obviously more than enough pages about how to write better.

Be concrete. Focus on the core message. Evoke emotion. Entertain, surprise, tell a story, omit needless words.

Simplify, simplify, simplify.

Despite all this useful advice, many aspiring writers fail to heed the most important rule that is guaranteed to double your readers:

Trust your material.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

A Smattering Of Stupid Writer Tricks

A Smattering Of Stupid Writer Tricks | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
• A simple formula for writing: take the story from high intensity (action, argument, manifest tension, drama) to low intensity (dialogue, simmering tension, concerted character development). Nothing should be without tension, and conflict should carry throughout.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

3 Essentials of Effective Character Descriptions

3 Essentials of Effective Character Descriptions | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the need to cram everything important into the first few pages of your first chapter, take a moment to step away from the keyboard. (Seriously. Stand back!)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Best Rest Practices for Optimal Productivity and Creativity

Best Rest Practices for Optimal Productivity and Creativity | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
We know taking breaks optimizes work-and-create flow. But what are the best practices and under what conditions? Some people advise mindful breaks. Others suggest full-blown hour-long naps. Much depends upon your circumstances and your desired ends.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

How to Accomplish Twice the Writing in Half the Time

Many writers struggle with time management, but I’ve taken this dilemma to a whole, new level. In this post I want to talk about how I’ve learned to accomplish twice the writing in half the time.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

5 Surprising Ways Reading Can Benefit Your Health

5 Surprising Ways Reading Can Benefit Your Health | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
For writers, reading may seem as essential to life as breathing. But did you know reading has actually been proven to have surprising health benefits? So the next time you feel like your creativity has quit and your writing has wilted, reach for the remedy: your favorite book! Here are five remarkable ways that reading can improve your sense of well-being and keep you healthy:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Book Titles--How Important Are They? How Do You Get a Great One?

Book Titles--How Important Are They? How Do You Get a Great One? | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it

As an editor and writing teacher, I read lots of good manuscript with terrible titles.  How much more compelling it would be if that good manuscript had a terrific title.

Terrific titles help sell manuscripts.  Because they catch the eye of the agent who has already scanned hundreds of queries that day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mooderino
Scoop.it!

Chapter One: Gone Girl

Chapter One: Gone Girl | The Funnily Enough | Scoop.it
Chapter One is a series of posts where I take apart the first chapter of a successful book to see what makes it work, how the author hooked the reader, which rules were followed and which were broken to good effect (previous entries can be found here: Chapter One Analyses).

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn was published in 2012 and made into a hit movie last year. The author’s previous two novel were moderately successful, but sold nowhere near as many copies as this one.

It’s a contemporary mystery thriller, written in the first person by two narrators, both of whom seem fairly unreliable. Chapters are alternated in a he said/she said format. The story starts with the husband (Nick) writing on the day his wife goes missing. The wife (Amy) is represented by a diary that begins on the day she first met Nick at a party in Manhattan.

I’ll be looking at both first chapters (his and hers) to see how they differ and how they complement each other.
more...
No comment yet.