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When the ingredients matter: Crostini e Bruschette

When the ingredients matter: Crostini e Bruschette | The Authentic Food & Wine Experience | Scoop.it

The word crostini means little toasts, whereas bruschetta has as its origin bruscare, to char or roast.  I’ve always thought the difference to be in the bread used. When I make crostini, I use a baguette, thinly sliced on the diagonal. For bruschette, I use a thicker slice taken from a loaf of Italian bread. I toast both before piling on the fixin’s and sometimes pop them back into the oven afterward. It really does depend on what’s being used to top each off. And speaking of the fixin’s, you can use pretty much anything you like. Just stick with fresh ingredients and you won’t go wrong.

 

Mozzarella and Tomato Bruschette Recipe

 

Ingredients

1.7 cm slices of Italian bread plum tomatoes, seeded and chopped garlic, minced a few tbsp of sweet onion, diced fresh mozzarella, cut in cubes fresh basil leaves, hand torn Italian seasoning olive oil Balsamic vinegar dried oregano salt & pepper

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Crostini alla Caprese Recipe

Ingredients

1.2 cm thick slices of baguette, cut on the diagonal cherry tomatoes, sliced in half fresh mozzarella, cut in ¼ inch (.6 cm) slices fresh basil leaves olive oil red wine vinegar salt & pepper

Click for directions


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Cook with Parmigiano, Help Emilia Romagna

Cook with Parmigiano, Help Emilia Romagna | The Authentic Food & Wine Experience | Scoop.it

Emilia-Romagna is well known for its production of delicious food products yet there would be no cuisine in Emilia without Parmigiano Reggiano, the hard, semi-fat cheese, that is cooked but not pasteurized, slow-maturing with high-protein content and carries the fame of a secular nobility...


Via Mariano Pallottini
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Good News from Finland - Cold-smoked Lapland Reindeer meat gets EU protection

Good News from Finland - Cold-smoked Lapland Reindeer meat gets EU protection | The Authentic Food & Wine Experience | Scoop.it

Lapin Poro (Lapland Reindeer) cold-smoked reindeer meat has received an EU protected designation of origin (PDO). To date nearly one thousand products have received PDOs. Of these, only 31 meat products are protected in this way, the most famous being Parma ham. Finnish products in this group include Lapin Poro dried reindeer meat registered last year as well as the cold-smoked Lapin Poro reindeer.


Via Ulla M. Saikku
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Crayfish season starts – what do you need to remember?

Crayfish season starts – what do you need to remember? | The Authentic Food & Wine Experience | Scoop.it

When live crayfish are delivered to notified food premises or food establishments, they must be accompanied by a commercial document, which provides the information about catch area - caught in sea: one of the defined sea areas, or caught in fresh water: country of origin, as well as the scientific name of the species, the amount of crayfish, the delivery date and information on the sender and the recipient.

 

The crayfish season starts on 21 July and runs until the end of October. Usually a total of some 3-4 million crayfish are caught. Most of the caught crayfish are signal crayfish, and noble crayfish make up the rest. To assure food safety after catching, live crayfish must be protected against light and excessive warming, which means the storage cage should be placed deep enough underwater and in a shady location. Water replacement must take place at a high rate inside and around the cage. In order to prevent the spreading of crayfish plague, the storage cages must never be kept in other natural waters than the waters in which the crayfish were caught. Live crayfish must not be moved from one natural waterway to another.

 

And remember: dead crayfish may not be cooked for use as food.


Via Knapco
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Featured Ingredient – Chickpeas

Featured Ingredient – Chickpeas | The Authentic Food & Wine Experience | Scoop.it

Since we bought our property here in Umbria, I have truly learned to appreciate the versatility of dried beans as beans and grains do play an important part in Umbrian cuisine. Although I often use the wonderful lentils from Castelluccio here in Umbria, the cicerchie (a dried bean that looks like a cross between fava beans and chickpeas), or cannellini beans in my kitchen, it has taken me longer to learn to love chickpeas. I recently bought a bag of dried chickpeas that cost me less than 2 euros at the grocery store and from that one little bag of beans, once cooked,  Considered one of our most ancient foods, the health benefits and versatility of chickpeas (and other dried beans) should encourage us all to incorporate more legumes into our daily diets. Read more about Dried Legumes.

Buying Chickpeas - Look for beans that are intact and unbroken and try to buy from a source that has a good turnover. Very old beans will take longer to cook and often do not retain their shape as well as younger ones do. Storing Chickpeas - Do not mix your newly purchased beans with older ones and they may have different cooking times. Dried beans keep best stored in an air-tight container in a cool, dry place. Cooking Chickpeas - Chickpeas take longer to cook than most other dried beans and do require pre-soaking. Place in a large bowl of water in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours before cooking. Once soaked, bring beans and liquid to a boil in a large saucepan, then reduce the heat and cook until tender but intact, which may take anywhere from 1 1/2 to 3 hours depending on the age of the bean. Once cooked, drain and use as desired. I also cook extra beans and store them in the freezer for future soups and stews.
Via Mariano Pallottini
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Heirloom and Nearly Extinct, the Italian Solfino Bean: La Tavola Marche and Slow Food

Heirloom and Nearly Extinct, the Italian Solfino Bean: La Tavola Marche and Slow Food | The Authentic Food & Wine Experience | Scoop.it

This spring we will plant an antique almost extinct bean, the solfino in our garden. I recently read an article from Le Marche & Food on Scoop.it about a rare flavorful bean from our region of Italy, I was intrigued. We pride ourselves on eating locally, growing our own food & supporting the values of Slow Food, so the thought of preserving a Marche heirloom seed from the dangers of extinction from industrial production was exciting! I contacted La Bona Usanza, the head of the local Slow Food convivium and cooperative that is responsible for cultivating the bean.  In a noisy cafe in a medieval city outside Ancona we were told all about this curious, age-old bean. Solfino is small, round and pale yellow (like sulphur from which it takes its name) with a rich & creamy flavor commonly cultivated in the central Italy (Marche, Tuscany and Umbria) in the past.

The Solfino Bean has a particularly thin skin, creamy consistency, delicate taste and a capacity to hold up well in cooking. Affectionately considered "the rich mans beans," because they are so costly (25 Euro/kilo) most Marchigiani serve guests just a spoonful drowned in extra virgin olive oil, because as our friend says, the beans are "come oro" like gold. We recommend you serve it just-boiled, still warm, with a healthy drizzling of your best olive oil and a pinch of salt. So simple, so perfect. Peasant cooking with a bean fit for a king!... click the photo to read the full article


Via Mariano Pallottini
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