Sustainability by Design
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Looks Good: What's It Made From? Who Made It? Is it helping or hurting the planet?
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'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune

'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it

Stockholm-based studio claesson koivisto rune have has created 3 sleek typologies for prefabricated homes that draw from the distinctly scandinavian landscape and approach to efficient living.


The 'Tind' residences draw their name from the norwegian word for 'mountain peak', a concept informed by the remarkable lack of sharp pointed peaks in scandinavian mountain systems. The softened edges of the range lend the landscape a particular beauty that finds its way into the architecture in the form of a truncated, single pitch roof. Floor-grazing windows are relegated to major walls and all apertures lie flush with light-drenched interiors. Rather than a perforated volume, the home is a rhythmic composition of built material and void, and despite the various models of kit houses, every interior is organized by a central entrance way or staircase and seeks to blur notions of interior and exterior.

While prefabricated homes have many historical iterations, the architectural integrity of the 'Tind' series is preserved through culturally relevant approaches to living...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from sustainable architecture
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Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.


This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...


Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
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