Sustainability by...
Follow
Find tag "architecture"
3.2K views | +0 today
Sustainability by Design
Looks Good: What's It Made From? Who Made It? Is it helping or hurting the planet?
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Innovative Sustainability: Matchbox Elementary School Sports Hall

Innovative Sustainability: Matchbox Elementary School Sports Hall | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it

The Obrenovac First Elementary School is the first established school in Belgrade, almost 200 years old. During the two centuries pupils of this school had no adequate indoor space for physical education and sports activities. 

From the very beginning the idea was to design low budget, energy efficient and sustainable building with no unnecessary details.

As Obrenovac Municipality is close to the river Sava banks, it is under the influence of the underground water. This was the crucial technical problem which had to be resolved from the first preliminary design phase. Through design process, the solution for these challenges has been successfully found by designing the waterproof concrete hull, 5 meters deep in the ground, just few centimeters over the highest underground water level. This concept provided some kind of waterproof box, as boat sink, for all premises inside.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Lola Ripollés's curator insight, April 19, 10:57 AM

From the very beginning the idea was to design low budget, energy efficient and sustainable building with no unnecessary details.

Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.


This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...


Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture

Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it

Located in rolling hillsides of Carmel, California, the Caterpillar House is a 2-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom dwelling that implements sustainable features and strategies for minimal development impact.


Feldman Architecture gave the client a home that connects seamlessly with the outdoors, in the form of a modern ranch with strong horizontal lines.

The house is quite literally made from the ground it sits on, with repurposed dirt from the site being used in the building of the walls. The “rammed earth walls” help keep the temperature steady because they act as a thermal mass. The house also utilizes natural ventilation to keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

The roof integrates photovoltaic panels that produce all the required energy, and have been carefully integrated into the design...


View more imagery of the first LEED Platinum Custom Home on the California Central Coast and read the project description at Feldman Architecture.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune

'Tind' Prefab Houses by Stockholm-based Design Studio Claesson Koivisto Rune | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it

Stockholm-based studio claesson koivisto rune have has created 3 sleek typologies for prefabricated homes that draw from the distinctly scandinavian landscape and approach to efficient living.


The 'Tind' residences draw their name from the norwegian word for 'mountain peak', a concept informed by the remarkable lack of sharp pointed peaks in scandinavian mountain systems. The softened edges of the range lend the landscape a particular beauty that finds its way into the architecture in the form of a truncated, single pitch roof. Floor-grazing windows are relegated to major walls and all apertures lie flush with light-drenched interiors. Rather than a perforated volume, the home is a rhythmic composition of built material and void, and despite the various models of kit houses, every interior is organized by a central entrance way or staircase and seeks to blur notions of interior and exterior.

While prefabricated homes have many historical iterations, the architectural integrity of the 'Tind' series is preserved through culturally relevant approaches to living...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Davis Cushing from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Pop-up stars: temporary contemporary architecture

Pop-up stars: temporary contemporary architecture | Sustainability by Design | Scoop.it
From huge temporary stadia to tiny transitory event spaces, pop-up architecture fulfils many roles and comes in many guises.

In some cases the very latest technologies are used to engineer complex structures, while in others a readymade approach using scavenged materials is more appropriate. Several noteworthy examples include semi-permanent structures, container architecture and event pavilions.


This article examines some key pop-up projects that are designed to make the most of their short lifespans...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.