The economics of hope
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Why shoppers don't care about Bangladesh - MarketWatch

Why shoppers don't care about Bangladesh - MarketWatch | The economics of hope | Scoop.it

More than 1,100 people were killed in the clothing-factory collapse in Bangladesh earlier this year. Yet most consumers will probably continue to buy clothes without asking questions about their origins, experts say.

John Piesse's insight:

There must be a social context in which individuals can internalise risks.

 

Most people, including myself, are "conditional co-operators". If my mates pay more for ethical products, I probably will, but if they don't understand or communicate the value of doing so, my guess is they probably aren't buying ethical products and I probably won't based on their influence. They more than anyone are probably the people I'm going to respond to if they believe I should be doing more, but if the context is wrong then I'm probably not going to be receptive.

 

Ian Robinson says "there is no socio-cultural benefits for an individual to buy something that isn't recogniseable as ethical". I learnt that at uni in 1st year marketing when we were told the Toyota Prius (which looked very different from anything else) sold much better than the Honda Civic Hybrid (which looked like the non-hybrid model ).

 

A more sophisticated and intuitive mechanism to recognise decisions made where we share the ethical values that were the basis of the decision -where we agree the decision was made to do the right thing- would help to reduce the widely held view that these decisions can only be communicated in the mainstream at a superficial level.

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Jon Yeo – Turn Your Passion into a Profitable Purpose | geoffmcdonald.com

Jon Yeo – Turn Your Passion into a Profitable Purpose | geoffmcdonald.com | The economics of hope | Scoop.it

Jon Yeo, curator and licensee of TEDx Melbourne.


Jon is an international speaker and expert on the mindset for success and productivity. He consults with large organisations and is an advisor to a number of social enterprises.

 

All 300 seats for TEDx Melbourne are typically sold-out in less than 90 minutes!

Jon talks about the success of TEDx Melbourne and how to turn an idea that you’re passionate and excited about into something that is profitable and fulfils your purpose.

In particular, Jon talks about:

What it takes to create an experience that audiences clamour over and saviour.Creating an ecosystem of value.How to run a virtual organisation where everything is digital.
John Piesse's insight:

ecosystem of possibilities "ideas that spread"

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Four Reasons Marketers Should Focus on Brand Advocacy

Four Reasons Marketers Should Focus on Brand Advocacy | The economics of hope | Scoop.it
Marketing channels have gone through two major phases and are now entering a third one: advocacy. Here's what marketers need to keep in mind about it.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
John Piesse's insight:

"Consumers trust other consumers. 

 

The advocate channel, once built, has a powerful voice.

 

Advocates extend your salesforce."

 
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, November 11, 2013 1:15 PM

Richard shows how Marketing channels have evolved, and the importance of Advocacy:

 

Consumers trust other consumers. 

 

The advocate channel, once built, has a powerful voice.

 

Advocates extend your salesforce.


There are now systems to help you track and manage advocate activity.

 

Is your company using all tools and channels today?

Sorieba Daffae's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:20 AM
Food for thought...
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Why shoppers don't care about Bangladesh - MarketWatch

Why shoppers don't care about Bangladesh - MarketWatch | The economics of hope | Scoop.it

More than 1,100 people were killed in the clothing-factory collapse in Bangladesh earlier this year. Yet most consumers will probably continue to buy clothes without asking questions about their origins, experts say.

John Piesse's insight:

There must be a social context in which individuals can internalise risks.

 

Most people, including myself, are "conditional co-operators". If my mates pay more for ethical products, I probably will, but if they don't understand or communicate the value of doing so, my guess is they probably aren't buying ethical products and I probably won't based on their influence. They more than anyone are probably the people I'm going to respond to if they believe I should be doing more, but if the context is wrong then I'm probably not going to be receptive.

 

Ian Robinson says "there is no socio-cultural benefits for an individual to buy something that isn't recogniseable as ethical". I learnt that at uni in 1st year marketing when we were told the Toyota Prius (which looked very different from anything else) sold much better than the Honda Civic Hybrid (which looked like the non-hybrid model ).

 

A more sophisticated and intuitive mechanism to recognise decisions made where we share the ethical values that were the basis of the decision -where we agree the decision was made to do the right thing- would help to reduce the widely held view that these decisions can only be communicated in the mainstream at a superficial level.

more...
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‘Buy One, Give One’ Spirit Imbues an Online Store

‘Buy One, Give One’ Spirit Imbues an Online Store | The economics of hope | Scoop.it
The altruistic shoemaker Toms is blazing a trail for like-minded companies with a new online store that features retailers with a social bent.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, November 6, 2013 10:42 PM

"According to an annual study by the Edelman public relations agency, when quality and price were equal, 53 percent of consumers ranked a brand’s activities on social causes as a deciding purchasing factor in 2012, up from 42 percent in 2008."


This new TOMS marketplace should create further goodwill and financial results, while also capitalizing on male demographics to help their brand further.


What are your thoughts on this concept? 

John Piesse's comment, December 2, 2013 6:44 AM
I think that this marketplace must employ a system of value transactions that work with intuitive judgement in order to be successful. The TOMS concept is an elegant, communicable and transparent example of "value-facture".
Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's comment, December 2, 2013 9:59 AM
Thanks John for your valuable input.
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Customer in control: The future of shopping is already here and retailers are battling to keep up

Customer in control: The future of shopping is already here and retailers are battling to keep up | The economics of hope | Scoop.it
Retail businesses that succeed will be those that understand customers want an experience with their purchases, whether buying online or in a traditional store.

 

Dr Amanda Imber says being green and sustainable has shifted from a niche movement to a mainstream concept and many brands are either being built from a sustainability position or are incorporating it as a core part of their brand. Consumers want to know where the product comes from, how it is made and who manufactures it; retailers breaching environmental and social standards will be punished by consumers who choose to engage with competitors instead.

She adds that consumers will increasingly swap and trade with each other rather than buy from retailers, in part to feel they are making ethical choices, which boosts their self-esteem.

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When Greens Eat Themselves

When Greens Eat Themselves | The economics of hope | Scoop.it
A leaked report shows environment groups aren’t having the impact they’d like you to think they are.
John Piesse's insight:

No action can come from saying "what", without connecting it to the "how and why".

 

There IS a significant amount of concern about the environment in our society but also a massive sense of disempowerment. No group can make an impact without organising a system that links the way people think and feel about their day to day lives and aspects of environment that capture their imaginations. This must include a mechanism that allows people to learn intuitively from their actions. It can't be seperate from the economy or from society. 

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