the dust bowl during the 1930's
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the dust bowl during the 1930's
how life was during the dust bowl
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Historical Letter

my letter 

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Dear big brother James

 

 

How you been? I was writing to tell you about what has happened to us these past few months. Lately we have been having dust bowls. Dust bowls are where the wind blows the dust up in big clouds and when I say big, I mean huge storms. Sand was everywhere. The storms usually lasted hours to days to a week. It was hard. I felt bad for our maid, she kept cleaning & cleaning but every time she swept it would be right back covered.  It was hard to walk to school, just everywhere because you could barely see. When the first storm happened, nobody knew what it was. Imagine if you were outside and you seen a big dust storm coming at you really fast and you didn’t know what It was.  I felt bad for our little brothers and sisters because they had to go to school in it risking their lives. It was crazy.  People were starting to get dusk pneumonia. Dusk pneumonia was when the dusk gets caught in your lungs and in your body.  Hospitals were getting filled and a lot of people started to die. My sister had moved down to our aunt’s house where there were no dust storms. She was the youngest so mom wanted her to be safe. We usually slept with facemasks on to keep the dust out. A lot of people in the city had facemasks on to try to stay alive till the storms were over.  Sometimes we would barely eat because with the storms going on we couldn’t go to the store at times it was just to risky unless we really, really had to.  When the storms was over mom prepared us a lot of storm kits with lots of snacks and food. We never knew when the storms were coming back because it would just pop up. You would know if it was one because it wasn’t hard to see it. Mom really did her best to keep us healthy. When storms was over she would walk our little sister to school because just incase the storm came back she would be right there to help her. When our little sister is at school and the dust storm would happen all the students would get under the desks. She told us 1 day that when they were in class and the storm happened it busted the windows and came in really fast and strong. They all screamed and were scared. Her teacher made sure they all were under their desks covering their face. It is really hot as it is. The dust storms happen because of no rain or precipitation to the ground.  Although we were bored mama usually tried to keep up entertained.  Long and boring, the days went by during the storm and when the storms finally finished we would be so happy. We loved going outside and playing. Mom loved watching us play and run around happy.   Toward the end of the storm, it slowed down and eventually stopped. You knew when the storm ended or was about to.  Disgusted by the sand, it got everywhere you didn’t want it.  To finish sweeping quickly, we waited till it almost ended or ended.  Our little sister, Aubrey was certainly lucky. I was glad Aubrey wasn’t there because she was only 4 and dust hits her faster than others. I felt bad for our neighbors because they lost their newborn twin to dust pneumonia. The twin was exposed to the dust to fast and wasn’t properly equipped for the storm.  Whenever we would come in from being outside and we were really dirty and dusty mom would get so mad but get over it so quickly.  We are really growing up, I will be 17 next month, jaylen will be 13 in 2 months, and tae will be 9 tomorrow.  I can’t believe your 21. Mom misses you so much and wishes she had you around. Well keep in touch.

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Vocabulary

vocabulary words from the articles

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Vocabulary 1. Meteorologically- with respect to the weather 2. Euphemism- a mild or indirect word or expression for one too harsh or blunt when referring to something unpleasant or embarrassing. 3. Emissions- the production and discharge of something, esp. gas or radiation 4. Scanty- small or insufficient in quantity or amount 5. Intensifies – become or make more intense 6. Panhandles- a narrow strip of territory projecting from the main territory of one state into another state 7. Cultivation- socialization through training and education to develop one’s mind or manners 8. Semiarid- somewhat arid 9. Bountiful- large in quantity 10. Desiccated- remove the moisture from something, (esp. food) typically in order to preserve it

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A Dust Cloud Rolling Over the Prairies (near Hugoton, Kansas) - Kansas Memory Primary Doc #3

A Dust Cloud Rolling Over the Prairies (near Hugoton, Kansas) - Kansas Memory Primary Doc #3 | the dust bowl during the 1930's | Scoop.it
A Dust Cloud Rolling Over the Prairies (near Hugoton, Kansas) - Kansas Memory
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Letters From the Dust Bowl Primary doc #1

Letters From the Dust Bowl Primary doc #1 | the dust bowl during the 1930's | Scoop.it
When drought struck Oklahoma in the 1930s, the author and her husband stayed behind to protect their 28-year-old farm. Her letters to a friend paint a picture of dire poverty, desiccated soil, and long days with no sunshine.
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Dust Bowl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia website #1

The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought combined with farming methods that did not include crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops, soil terracing and wind-breaking trees to prevent wind erosion.[1] Extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains in the preceding decade had displaced the natural deep-rooted grasses that normally kept the soil in place and trapped moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. Rapid mechanization of farm implements, especially small gasoline tractors and widespread use of the harvester-combine were significant in the decisions to convert grassland (much of which received no more than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year) to cultivated cropland.

During the drought of the 1930s, without natural anchors to keep the soil in place, it dried, turned to dust, and blew away with the prevailing winds. At times, the clouds blackened the sky, reaching all the way to East Coast cities such as New York and Washington, D.C. Much of the soil ended up deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, carried by prevailing winds. These immense dust storms—given names such as "black blizzards" and "black rollers"—often reduced visibility to a few feet (a meter) or less. The Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2), centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, and adjacent parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas.[2]

Millions of acres of farmland were damaged, and hundreds of thousands of people were forced to leave their homes; many of these families (often known as "Okies", since so many came from Oklahoma) migrated to California and other states, where they found economic conditions little better during the Great Depression than those they had left. Owning no land, many became migrant workers who traveled from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages. Author John Steinbeck later wrote The Grapes of Wrath, which won the Pulitzer Prize, and Of Mice and Men, about such people.

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Dust storms in the 1930s Dust Bowl website #3

Dust storms in the 1930s Dust Bowl website #3 | the dust bowl during the 1930's | Scoop.it
Drought Research at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University in Palisades, New York
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Dust Bowl Stories Primary Doc #2

Dust Bowl Stories Primary Doc #2 | the dust bowl during the 1930's | Scoop.it
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Nathan Cushenbery-Andrews's comment, February 5, 2013 11:04 PM
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