The Dust Bowl and Farmers
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The Dust Bowl and Farmers
This page is about the Dust bowl in the 1930s and the farmers.
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Vocabulary

Drought- a long period without rain.

* This year's drought was devastating to cotton growers

Plains- an extensive area of level and rolling, treeless country, often covered by rich, fertile soil.

* Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma are some of the state apart of the Great Plains.

Migrant Worker- a person who moves from place to place to find work harvesting fruits and vegetables

* Most of the farmers who lost their farms had to become Migrant Workers

Irrigation- supplying dry land with water by means of ditches

* Farmers installed a new irrigation system to water his crops.

Breadline- line of people waiting for food handouts from charities or public agencies during the Great Depression

* People stood in breadlines for hours waiting to get bread and water

Topsoil- the layer of topsoil on the surface

*The wind blew topsoil off the farm grounds

Erosion- the process of eroding or being eroded by wind, water, or other natural agents

*The problem of soil erosion is caused by over production of goods

Okies- an impoverished migrant farm worker, especially one who left Oklahoma during the Depression of the 1930s to work elsewhere in the US

*Citizens of California did not like all of the Okies come from the Great Plains looking for jobs.

Euphemism- the substitution of a mild, indirect, or vague expression for one thought to be offensive, harsh, or blunt.

*Influential person' is the local euphemism for underworld don

Recession- A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months

*People started losing their jobs. They couldn’t afford goods and products. This led to the US going into a recession.

 

 

 

 

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Website Today #2

Website Today #2 | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

This website compares the drought from The Dust Bowl to present day. It tells about the causes that were the same. It also show how the two drought were different.

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Website Today #1

Website Today #1 | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

This website focuses on the droughts today. It talks about the Dust bowl. It compares and compares and contrast the storms to see which one was the biggest disaster.

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Primary Document 3: A Newsletters From the Dust Bowl

Primary Document 3: A Newsletters From the Dust Bowl | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

These are some of many new articles talking about the Dust Bowl. I wanted to show what the people were reading during this time. There were many Newspaper companies covering this topic. This was a big issue. There was no Television back then. The only way people all over the country could hear about major news was the radio and the newspaper.

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Primary Document 2: Dust Bowl Cartoon

Primary Document 2: Dust Bowl Cartoon | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

This is a cartoon drawn by Kennedy Berryman. Its illustrates a man just standing. This farm is being torn to pieces and burried by the Dust Storm. He the man in the picture states "All I Said was gimme six more justices. I think this means that he ask for more support for his farm. Instead, he got a horrible Dust Storm like the other farmers. Basically its saying that the farmers didnt ask for this.

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Letter

April 23, 1930

Dear Granny,

 

I miss you a lot. Ma and pa are getting long great now that the farm is doing well. We got some new workers too. They don’t speak English. Pa said them people are from Mexico. Do you know where Mexico is granny? Pa treats em bad. He says were suppose to or they will try to get us. I like their daughter. She’s bout my age. We listen to the radio in the barn. Pa’ll get mad if we’re together. We like to listen to fights on the radio. Our favorite singer is Woody Guthrie. We listen to him all the time.  Well granny talk to you again.

 

Love,

Sara Ann

 

July 12, 1930

Dear Granny,

 

How are you? Are you doing alright? We’re not doing so well. To start off, pa is in jail now. He beat up ma. They were arguing over money. We don’t have that many workers anymore; we can’t afford them anymore. Ma told me it’s because of the new droughts. Our farm looks something like a dessert. It’s always hot outside and I can’t remember the last time we had rain. Ma said its’ not safe to go outside. So now we have to play in the house. I’ve been hearing about soldiers from WWI having riots about money. I don’t really pay attention to that anyway. We haven’t had anything to do really. Pa’s gone and we can’t go outside no more. Wish you were here…

 

Love,

Sara Ann

 

March 3, 1935

Dear Granny,

 

I really wish you were here. Pa’s out of jail, but we don’t have a home. We had to leave because of the dust storms. The dust storm covered our whole ranch. It killed Bessie; she was my favorite cow. All the animals are dead now. We have been going from state to state because pa’s been looking for a job. Ma says he is trying to get a job to pay for John’s treatment. Ma says he has some sand in his lungs. He doesn’t look like himself though. He’s very tired all the time, so he doesn’t play anymore. I get in trouble because I cry too much; it’s just so hard. We’ve been riding the trains everywhere. There are a lot of old people on the trains too. We have to run to get on them. Whenever we go somewhere new, people calls us Okies. What’s an Okie? Can’t wait to hear from you.

 

Love,

Sara Ann

 

January 20, 1936

Dear Granny,

 

We have finally stopped traveling. We have moved in this little town. It’s not a rich one. The people around us are poor like us. They are very nice. The kids’ play kick the can all the time. This lady named Beth tells us stories from when she was a girl. I have friends, but I still cry at night. John is really sick now. He has to stay in all the time. Our house is not that big.  It’s just one little room. We have to cook our soup outside on the fire. We don’t have a stove anymore. We lost everything in the storm except the clothes on our backs. Pa doesn’t have money for clothes. I wish could work. I would be able to help John. Granny, I hope I get to see you again.

 

Love,

Sara Ann

 

May 7, 1937

Dear Granny,

 

I can barely write. I can’t see anything because I can’t stop crying. John passed away yesterday. His lungs gave out. Ma and pa wont stop crying. They keep blaming each other for his passing. Pa kept threatening to leave me and ma. Him and ma got into a big fight and he left. I keep praying and crying that he will come back, but I don’t think it’s working. We don’t have any money to bury John. Ma left his body in the little house and made me leave. Now we are traveling on a train again. I don’t know where we’re going, but I hope it’s to you. I’m tired and I just wanna die like John. It’s so hard granny. Please come find us.

 

Love,

Sara Ann

 

October 31, 1939

Dear Granny,

 

It rained for the first time in years. I am happy for that, but I felt like it was just raining on me. I was alone by myself. Last time I wrote to ya I was with ma. When I was asleep, ma was holding me on the train. When I woke up, she was gone and I was surround by strangers. I didn’t have a clue where I was and where I was going. I didn’t know where ma was and why she left me. I cried and cried until the train stopped. I got off and ran into a nice lady Her name is Joy Wilson. She took me to her home. Her and her husband, Maxwell Wilson, are very rich. They have 2 children. One is a girl younger than me and her name is Grace. The other one is a boy. His name is Maxwell. He’s named after his father. They gave me a room. They treat me real nice. The markets are back up. The banks are back in business and farmers are getting their farms back. That’s pretty great, but back to the Wilsons. They treat me so good, but money is nothing like love from your family. This place is great, but I wanna come and live with you. They said they’d pay my way to ya. So I’m coming to you. I’m so happy. I’ve been on my own without family for two years, and now I’m going to be reunited with you. I’m ready to come to you. So, here I come. See you when I get there.

 

Love,

Sara Ann

 

 

 

 

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Historical Website #3

Historical Website #3 | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

This website talks about the struggle of the farmers and their families. It gives information on the migration. It also tells about the farmers struggle and how they had to live.

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Historical Website #2

Historical Website #2 | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

This website was a great one. It is a timeline of the entire Dust Bowl. It gives facts about the Dust storm from the beginning of the Dust bowl, all they way to the end of the drought in 1939.

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Historical Website #1

Historical Website #1 | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

This website is completey about the weather. It gives all kinds os forecast and weather reports from  the Dust Bowl. It is a key factor in The Dust Bowl.

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Primary Document 1: The Speech of Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt about Dust Bowl Audio

Primary Document 1: The Speech of Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt about Dust Bowl Audio | The Dust Bowl and Farmers | Scoop.it

President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his speech over the topic "The Dust Bowl. This speech was heard on Radio Stations across the US. The President Spoke about what could be done to help out these suffering farmers and their families. He gave his point of view of the situation. He seemed to be very concerned and sounded understanding.

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