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The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity
Digital strangers are people we interact with, people we are inspired by, people we understand (even a little) about their views and their position in a specific network, but know very little about. We can still learn from and with them. We can create and share. We can innovate and solve problems. We can increase awareness and affect change. We can engage, entertain and provide comfort or inspiration.
Curated by Peter Bryant
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Twitter users: A guide to the law

Twitter users: A guide to the law | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Social media users are increasingly falling foul of the law, so what are the rules on what you can and can't say?
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Through the Noise: Balance in a Digital World

Through the Noise: Balance in a Digital World | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Photo Credit: giulia.forsythe via Compfight cc When thinking about balance in a digital world, three questions come to mind: Why is balance necessary, how do we demonstrate or measure it, and are e...

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 21, 2013 11:46 PM

As educators, we need to teach about digital footprints and how they can impact our lives, both online and offline. Yet, can we sometimes inadvertently condone or not condone online attitudes. For example, it  can be difficult to avoid playing into the culture of public shaming that often occurs in social media. Perhaps the public shaming of individuals who have made poor online presence choices, generating “digital tattoos” as some have coined it (prints you are stuck with), is not the best way to instill an attitude of thoughtful dialogue and respect with regard to digital citizenship. After all, if public shaming becomes the norm, will society become immune to social consequences? Additionally, some may view a tattoo as a work of art or a sign of creativity. Instead, a willingness to listen, understand, help and support may set a better example. Through listening, we can create opportunities to help each other navigate this difficult digital world (a world that will undoubtedly see us make many more mistakes). Let’s listen; together we might just find balance!

Brad Ovenell-Carter's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:10 PM

As you say Ana, this is a journey we (in schools) have to make together with students and their families. No one really knows where all this will land and every community will have different needs so the only possible way forward is through constant dialogue with all stakeholders. At my school, we're developing that conversation arounf the Brand of Me, something I think sounds more proactive that digital footprints or tattoos; those are things you leave behind, passively. See this discussion over on Bill Ferriter's blog: http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical/2013/03/guest-post-braddo-on-digital-footprints.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+the_tempered_radical+(The+Tempered+Radical)

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What to do next if you're too cool for university

What to do next if you're too cool for university | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Coming soon: the 'Uncollege' where you learn skills 'above and beyond' university ... sometimes by going to lectures without enrolling
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Curating the Digital World: Past Preconceptions, Present Problems, Possible Futures | MW2013: Museums and the Web 2013

Curating the Digital World: Past Preconceptions, Present Problems, Possible Futures | MW2013: Museums and the Web 2013 | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
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Week 29: Dr. Alec Couros on digital citizenship and integrity #change11

Week 29: Dr. Alec Couros on digital citizenship and integrity #change11 | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Dr. Alec Couros in Week 29’s session presented his views on digital citizenship and literacies, a concept also discussed by Howard Rheingold in week 17.

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Josie Fraser CETIS conference: Digital Citizenship March 2013

Josie Fraser CETIS conference: Digital Citizenship March 2013 | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
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Why Teens Go Online: New Study...Born Free | Teacher Learning Networks

Why Teens Go Online: New Study...Born Free | Teacher Learning Networks | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

Linda Alexander's insight: New International Study by Research Now with Support of K&A BrandResearch Gives Insight into How the ‘Digital Generation’ Behaves on the Internet. Teens mostly go online to find informaiton and learn about events.


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Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT's comment, March 12, 2013 5:32 AM
Yes... if search savvy also means capability to distinguish between false and right info, to take time for a proper analysis, to develop a critical mindset.
Elizabeth Hutchinson's comment, March 12, 2013 9:26 AM
Absolutely :)
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 12, 2013 9:52 AM

New International Study by Research Now with Support of K&A BrandResearch Gives Insight into How the ‘Digital Generation’ Behaves on the Internet

The study of 2,490 respondents aged 12 – 17 years old from the US, Poland, Germany and the UK, looked at how this new digital generation connects with the internet, what they do online, and how they feel about digital and traditional advertisements.

The survey found that teenagers in all four markets enjoy unlimited and unsupervised access to the internet. Respondents reported that they are able to go online as long and as often as they wish, they do not need to ask for parental permission, and only in Germany are teenagers required to share internet access with siblings. 62% of the young people surveyed report that they go online every single day - 46% several times a day. Age does not make a big difference when comparing the amount of time teens spend on the net. There is no sudden explosion in internet use at the age of 16; more a gradual increase in the amount of time spent online as children age. Of those who go online several times a day, 11% are 12 years old and 21% are 17 years old. Teenagers in the UK and Poland use the internet 20% more often than their counterparts in Germany and America.

Why teens go online
The top reason why teens go online, cited by 92% of respondents, is to find out information – ‘looking up things I don’t know.’ The second most popular activity is finding out about events and what’s happening, with 83% of teens doing this. Next, young people use the internet to research public transport and ‘window shop’ (researching and browsing for items), with 74% saying that’s why they go online. Teenagers in Poland use the internet to search for and purchase products more frequently than their international counterparts. Overall, only 35% of teens say they actually purchase items online. After ‘window shopping,’ the most popular activity is playing games, with 73% of teens going online to do this.

Devices used to access the internet
Roughly one-third of the teens surveyed from each country go on the internet most often via a PC or laptop. The additional two-thirds reported accessing the internet through a tablet, smart phone, video game console, television or other device. According to the survey, 27% of British teens go online via their smart phones, whilst fewer American (11%), German (9%) and Polish (2%) teens use their smart phone to get online.

What teenagers search for and buy
Music and CDs are the most popular items to search for online. Teens in Poland, however, search for online games more than music (64% in Poland as opposed to 59% in the US; 57% in the UK; and 56% in Germany). Shoes are also a popular search item among British (62%) and Polish (57%) teens, but not as popular among German (53%) and American (42%) teens.

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How Should Social Media Be Taught in Schools?

How Should Social Media Be Taught in Schools? | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
The power of connected learning expands the classroom to infinity and beyond, but students still need a teacher’s guidance.

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, March 8, 2013 8:22 PM

Teach, teach, teach!  

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Digital Tribes - What's Your Tribe?

Digital Tribes - What's Your Tribe? | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

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margot roi's curator insight, March 26, 11:26 AM

Could it be creativity, blogging, different perspectives, encouraging others? What tribe do you belong to?

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Gen Y-fi caught in web fixation

Gen Y-fi caught in web fixation | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Young people depend on internet devices such as smartphones to "drive every facet of their lives", a report finds.
Peter Bryant's insight:

It annoys me now end that in article that should be reporting fact, words like addiction are used to describe habits.  I will leave the rest of my rant to my next blog post http://www.peterbryant.org

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Social Media in Education: Resource Roundup

Social Media in Education: Resource Roundup | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Resources by Topic:


Creating Social Media Guidelines
Student Engagement with Social Media
Social Media for Professional Development
Digital Citizenship and Online Safety
Additional Resources on...

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SchoolandUniversity's comment, February 14, 2013 6:12 AM
thanks for sharing and directed me to social media
Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, February 14, 2013 9:33 AM
Glad you found it inspiring James! :-)
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, May 20, 2013 6:26 PM

Great guidelines...

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A More-Radical Online Revolution - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

A More-Radical Online Revolution - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
"Generative scholarship" spurs new questions, evidence, conclusions, and audiences. The Web could be a particularly fertile home for it.

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Smithstorian's curator insight, February 7, 2013 12:30 PM

Breathless talk of innovation and deep skepticism about its promises charge the atmosphere of higher education. Major universities and new consortia promote massive open online courses, TED talks dazzle with possibilities, and investors dream of enormous profits. For others on our campuses, however, excited references to "disruption" evoke memories of other recent innovations: the imposition of external assessment, the turn to adjunct faculty, the intrusion of boards into the educational mission, the retreat of public investment.

 

Both sides have a point. The new technologies do, in fact, promise a great leveraging of what our universities have to offer. And the plans offered so far do, in fact, risk diminishing the full impact of what universities can provide. The two sides thus far are largely talking past one another, even as MOOCs gather momentum.

 

ronically, the advocates and skeptics of online teaching might find common ground by thinking more boldly, beyond the terms of the current debate. The skeptics might ask whether the new technologies cannot offer useful amplification to our scholarly work of discovery; the advocates of the new technologies need to think more directly about how to reach broad audiences while also fostering meaningful conversations across the disciplines and bridging a division between teaching and scholarship.

 

Two crucial parts of higher education that have received little attention in the debates thus far—the humanities and the creation of new knowledge—can help advance those conversations.

 

Two examples from my own field, history, illustrate the possibilities. The History Harvest project, begun by William G. Thomas at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and now also including James Madison University, plans to use a MOOC to create an online community to gather original research on local history, with undergraduate students leading the history harvest. This is an ingenious way to tap into the power of large audiences, often across broad spaces, to create new knowledge.

Gerol Petruzella's curator insight, February 7, 2013 12:31 PM

Thanks to Smithstorian for this one.

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The Modern Connected Workspace - thank you! @JESS3 [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

The Modern Connected Workspace - thank you! @JESS3 [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
The Modern Connected Workspace [INFOGRAPHIC]

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Jeni Mawter's curator insight, February 7, 2013 6:07 PM

Multiple screens connected in multiple ways will impact reading of children's and young adult stories in exciting new ways.

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's curator insight, February 7, 2013 7:58 PM

The far-reaching impact of technology: new environments require new leadership approaches & skills. 

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The 36 Rules Of Social Media

The 36 Rules Of Social Media | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
The following rules of social media are geared towards online businesses and less toward teachers but they're worth seeing anyway. The post The 36 Rules Of Social Media appeared first on Edudemic.
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Do You Suffer from Social Network Overload? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Do You Suffer from Social Network Overload? [INFOGRAPHIC] | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
Are you obsessed with social media? Do you suffer from social network overload? This infographic (from My Life) tells some interesting statistics. Takeaways (40% of people would rather get a root canal than give up their social networks?

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Rim Riahi's curator insight, March 20, 2013 3:00 AM

Are you obsessed with social media? Do you suffer from social network overload? This infographic (from My Life) tells some interesting statistics. Takeaways (40% of people would rather get a root canal than give up their social networks?

Sylvie Mercier's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:22 AM

clever

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avalanche-is-coming_Mar2013_10432.pdf

Peter Bryant's insight:

a fascinating insight into the potential future of higher education.  It is definitely a case of sh!t or get off the pot

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Lance Scaife-Elliott's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:16 AM

this is really interesting.

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Hacking at Education: TED, Technology Entrepreneurship, Uncollege, and the Hole in the Wall

Hacking at Education: TED, Technology Entrepreneurship, Uncollege, and the Hole in the Wall | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 15, 2013 4:23 AM

Both these projects — the Hole in the Wall and the Uncollege movement — claim to “hack education” on behalf of the learner. And both have been the topics of TED Talks — on the main TED stage and at the smaller TEDx spin–offs.

Mitra’s TED talks, which have been particularly successful, describe his company’s placing of computer kiosks into the slums of India. From there, street children have gained computer and English literacy skills without adult intervention.

It’s an story that Stephens nods vigorously at: the self-directed and self-motivated student can learn anything; no thanks to our testing-dominated public school curriculum; no thanks to our federally-subsidized, loan-obsessed university; but thanks to the Internet and the growing availability of open online resources -- thanks to the access and a lot of “grit.”

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Online Learning in a Networked Age

Presentation given at SUNY Learning Networks SOLSummit in Syracuse, New York on February 28, 2013

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Communities of Learning and the effect of existing hierarchies | Peter Sloep - Stories to TEL

Communities of Learning and the effect of existing hierarchies | Peter Sloep - Stories to TEL | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

Last week, I had the honour of  being asked to sit in on a PhD defence committee. The thesis was about the impact existing hierarchies have on the learning that goes on in communities of learning.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 10, 2013 6:49 PM

A blog post of mine (@pbsloep)

EsdeGroot's curator insight, April 17, 2013 3:34 AM

Interesting indeed. To judge whether the effect of existing hierarchies is cause for concern, I would need additional information about the way these communities have been set up. 

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8 Things to Look for in An Educational App

8 Things to Look for in An Educational App | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

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Gonna be a new race! Scaling the walls of institutional change | Peter Bryant

Gonna be a new race! Scaling the walls of institutional change | Peter Bryant | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

What is important to note is that I strongly believe that underpinning of this should be a vision for what kind of institution you want to be a part of, what kind of pedagogy informs your learning, teaching and assessment, how do you want find out about your learners and adapt to their skills?  And that this vision should be supported by action, people, evaluation and sharing.  It should align pedagogy and technology in an agile and collaborative way.  And finally that there is not one size this will fit all and they as markets have fractured, retail has personalised and the largest selling book of 2012 was originally a piece of internet distributed Twilight fan fiction, we also need to find unique and personalised paths through our reconstruction.

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How Students Benefit From Using Social Media - Edudemic

How Students Benefit From Using Social Media - Edudemic | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

Social media offers plenty of opportunities for learning and interactivity, and if you take a moment to think about it, it’s not too hard to see how students benefit from using social media. As younger generations use such technology in the classroom, they remake the educational landscape.

A look at four different ways that students benefit from using social media in their everyday lives, despite concerns about the overuse of social media by today's youth.

 

Read more at: http://edudemic.com/2013/02/how-students-benefit-from-using-social-media/


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 17, 2013 9:30 PM

Kids  are using social media all the time.  If we're in a position to teach them social skills, d

Ramil Sanchez's curator insight, February 18, 2013 7:45 PM

its the way of the 21st century, social era

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Online learning in the workplace: a hybrid model of participation in networked, professional learning | eLearning

Online learning in the workplace: a hybrid model of participation in networked, professional learning | eLearning | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

This article by Mary Thorpe and Jean Gordon was published on the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 28(8).

The design and conceptualisation of online learning environments for work-related, professional learning was addressed through research with users of an online environment for social workers. The core questions for the research were to identify the nature of participation in the online environment, the relationship between online participation and the offline context, and the implications for conceptualisation of online learning environments to support work-related learning. Key areas of the research literature in technology-enhanced and work related learning are discussed in order to position the study, to inform the research methods used and interpretation of the findings. Online participation needs to be understood as a hybrid concept, in that it is a reflection of offline roles, opportunities and pressures, as well as the usefulness, usability and relevance of what is online. Online participation was diverse, from short browsing for information to more reflective engagement that supported movement across the boundaries between roles and areas of work practice and a focus on practice skills and underlying values. Online sites intended to support work-related learning should start from the perspective of the socio-technical interaction network, with its emphasis on building in the social context at all stages in the life of a site.


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Social Media and Digital Identity: All About You, Me, or Us? // Speaker Deck

Social Media and Digital Identity: All About You, Me, or Us? // Speaker Deck | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it
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Hack the Classroom - adventures in transforming education

Hack the Classroom - adventures in transforming education | The Digital Stranger: Education, participation, social networking and creativity | Scoop.it

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Jesse Soininen's comment, February 7, 2013 5:13 PM
I just love to follow you!
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's comment, February 8, 2013 10:40 PM
Jesse ! Thank you! : )
Kathy Boyd's curator insight, February 9, 2013 9:44 AM

Would lover to see this in our school.