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Scuba Diver Open Water Diving Adventure Courses - PADI Scuba Diving Training Organization.

Scuba Diver Open Water Diving Adventure Courses - PADI Scuba Diving Training Organization. | The deep | Scoop.it
PADI Scuba Diver Course

Short on time and long on the urge to become a certified diver? The PADI Scuba Diver certification might just be for you. This course requires less time than the PADI Open Water Diver course, covering only the first three of five sections of knowledge development, the first three of five pool sessions, and the first two of four open water training dives, resulting in a limited certification. Particularly if you expect to go scuba diving primarily in the company of a dive guide or if you have limited time to devote to scuba certification, consider becoming a PADI Scuba Diver.

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2 giant oarfish wash onto California coast, making scientists curious.

2 giant oarfish wash onto California coast, making scientists curious. | The deep | Scoop.it

It's been the week of the oarfish along the Southern California coast.

A 14-foot oarfish carcass was discovered Friday by a snorkeler off the beach in Oceanside. Earlier in the week, an 18-foot oarfish was found dead off Catalina Island.

The oarfish is the world's largest bony fish and lives mostly at great depths. Because of its size and menacing appearance, the oarfish may be the source of tales of sea serpents.

Oceanside police responding to Friday's discovery contacted SeaWorld, the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and theNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Employees from NOAA removed the carcass for possible study.

Rick Feeney, ichthyology collections manager at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, told The Times earlier this week the giant oarfish only "wash up occasionally" because they're typically in deep open ocean.

When oarfish come closer to shore, Feeney said it may be a sign of distress. They could be starving, disoriented or landed in shallower water because of a storm. 

"They're usually in the deep ocean, away from land," Feeney said.

Giant oarfish get up to about 27 feet maximum, he said, adding that stories of them reaching 50 or more feet haven't been verified.

A 12-foot oarfish washed ashore in Malibu in 2010, but it was a much smaller -- and thinner -- variety with its silvery scales and a scarlet red dorsal fin.

In recent years, researchers have captured video of an oarfish swimming deep underwater in the Gulf of Mexico and spotted one swimming not far from the shore in Baja California. But not since a group of Navy SEALS found a 23-foot-long oarfish off Coronado in 1996 has such a large oarfish been reported.

[For the Record, 9:30 a.m. PDT Oct. 21: An earlier version of this post incorrectly reported that police responding to the discovery of the oarfish contacted the Scripps Research Institute. It was the Scripps Institute of Oceanography.]


Via Kathy Dowsett
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Kathy Dowsett's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:10 PM

Second one in a week!

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16 Things BuzzFeed Doesn't Know About The Ocean - Science Sushi

16 Things BuzzFeed Doesn't Know About The Ocean - Science Sushi | The deep | Scoop.it
BuzzFeed's 16 Things No One Knows About The Ocean was full of flaws. I set out to correct them and show that the truth is way better than fiction.
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Scuba Safety: Diving with Sharks - Scuba-Blog.com

Scuba Safety: Diving with Sharks - Scuba-Blog.com | The deep | Scoop.it
Scuba Safety: Diving with SharksPublished on October 17, 2013 at 11:48 am by Michael Schad 
Categorized under: Diver Safety

In a previous post, we went over the surprisingly low amount of actual shark related fatalities… usually not even making double digits in any given year, but that doesn’t mean you should dive straight in and seek them out without knowing what you are doing. Diving with sharks has the potential to be dangerous if the proper procedures are not followed. On the otherhand, diving with sharks has the gives you an opportunity to encounter one of the most graceful and beautiful creatures in the world, as well as a humbling experience. Please keep in mind that these guidelines are for people that actually want to seek out sharks and dive with them, if you aren’t interested in diving with sharks during your underwater adventures, don’t worry; the likelihood of  seeing a shark  is incredibly small.

Research And Know Your Sharks
While it is quite safe to swim unprotected with Nurse sharks and other smaller shark species, some of the larger species,  require a great deal of safety procedure to be followed. When you’ve decided to go diving with sharks, the most logical first step is to research the species of sharks that you’d be interested in diving with. When you do your research properly, you will be able to avoid potentially dangerous situations. For example if you were to go scouting for sharks, you need to know what species frequent the area. You also need to know their behaviors and how to recognize when a shark is accepting your presence or showing signs of aggression.


Via Kathy Dowsett
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Reef or Hazard? The Fate of Sunken Oil Rigs : DNews.

Reef or Hazard? The Fate of Sunken Oil Rigs : DNews. | The deep | Scoop.it
Oil companies and environmental groups agree that leaving scuttled rigs on the ocean floor creates a rich environment for endangered marine species.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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