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The recession in the music industry - a cause analysis

The recession in the music industry - a cause analysis | The Death of the Album | Scoop.it
Filesharing is made primarily responsible for the decline in sales in the phonographic industry, especially in the CD segment (see the current IFPI Digital Music Report). However, serious research ...
John Riley's insight:

This article takes a look at file-sharing, and the music business, to see is illegal downloading is really the culprit for the drop in music sales. It looks at a variety of factors, not only in the U.S. but in other countries as well. It show's that even though the amount of people illegally downloading music has somewhat dropped in the past few years, there has still been a decline in the sale's of music. How could this be? The chart above takes a look at the sale's of different formats of music since the  70's. It show's that L.P. sale's have become almost non existent. It also show's that C.D. sale's have been steadily dropping since 2000, while single's started to make huge advance's in sales, starting around 2003 (The year that iTunes was released). It also show's that digital albums have been steadily increasing but at a very slow rate. 

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Did iTunes Kill the Record Store?

Did iTunes Kill the Record Store? | The Death of the Album | Scoop.it
John Riley's insight:

This article take's a more direct look at how iTune's has effected both record sale's and record stores by making them almost obsolete in the new digital age. It show's that in 2004, many record chains, including Tower Records, began to go bankrupt. They were not able to compete with the amount of people buying music on their computer instead of at the store. It also show's that the number of music chains companies dropped from around 10,000 to just 2,000 in 15 years.  Another topic that this article touches on is the practice of big business retailer's such as Wal-Mart, Target, and JC-Penny, selling C.D.'s at cheaper prices in order to bring in more customer's. Many of these big business retailers know that they are losing money by doing this, but they are making more money just by getting customer's to come to their stores and buy a few other things while they are there.

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How People Bought Music In 2012 (Surprise: More Vinyl!?)

How People Bought Music In 2012 (Surprise: More Vinyl!?) | The Death of the Album | Scoop.it
Music consumers helped digital sales continue their climb, physical sales continue their slow death, and kept vinyl spinning in 2012, according to a year-in-review report from Nielsen Soundscan and Billboard. The report found that total music purchases (physical albums, digital albums and digital songs) totaled an all-time high of 1.65 billion units in 2012, a rise of 3.1 percent over 2011.
John Riley's insight:

This article takes a look at the sales of physical, v.s. digital music. It shows that physical music formats, such as C.D.'s has shown a yearly decline, dropping by 12.8 percent in 2012. It also goes on to show that Digital music has been rising steadily since 2003, and took a leap of 13 percent in 2012. But one form of physical music has began to make a comeback in the past 5 years. Vinyl sales saw a growth of 17.7 percent in 2012. Making the most noticeable change out of the three. Many fan's are once again starting to want the sense of physical ownership with their music. Could this be a come back for albums in the Albums v.s. Singles battle?

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Why singles sales aren't the good news the music industry claims

Why singles sales aren't the good news the music industry claims | The Death of the Album | Scoop.it
Eamonn Forde: Single tracks might be more popular than ever, but it's albums that make money – and sales of full-lengths continue to slump
John Riley's insight:

This article describes my topic perfect. In The above article is an overview of how single's are having a negative effect on not only album sale's, but the music industry as a whole. 2013 was the highest selling year yet for single's. Partly because of the growth of iTunes in the past few years. Yes, singles do still make money, but the majority of the money that an artist or record label receives comes from album sale's.

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The recession in the music industry - a cause analysis

The recession in the music industry - a cause analysis | The Death of the Album | Scoop.it
Filesharing is made primarily responsible for the decline in sales in the phonographic industry, especially in the CD segment (see the current IFPI Digital Music Report). However, serious research ...
John Riley's insight:

This article takes a look at file-sharing, and the music business, to see is illegal downloading is really the culprit for the drop in music sales. It looks at a variety of factors, not only in the U.S. but in other countries as well. It show's that even though the amount of people illegally downloading music has somewhat dropped in the past few years, there has still been a decline in the sale's of music. How could this be? The chart above takes a look at the sale's of different formats of music since the  70's. It show's that L.P. sale's have become almost non existent. It also show's that C.D. sale's have been steadily dropping since 2000, while single's started to make huge advance's in sales, starting around 2003 (The year that iTunes was released). It also show's that digital albums have been steadily increasing but at a very slow rate. 

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A decade of iTunes singles killed the music industry

A decade of iTunes singles killed the music industry | The Death of the Album | Scoop.it
For better or worse, iTunes dragged the music industry into the digital era.
John Riley's insight:

This article takes a look at the direct effect that iTunes has had on the music industry. In the above article, the author provides some shocking statistics, stating that last year the amount of singles sold were 7 times the amount of albums sold. It also states that since the introduction of iTunes in 2003, music sales have dropped from 11.8 billion to only 7.1 billion a year.

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