The Daily Leadership Scoop
26.5K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
onto The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

For Better Ideas, Take Your Boring Meetings Out For A Run

For Better Ideas, Take Your Boring Meetings Out For A Run | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
We can all agree that the conference room is probably not where your best ideas are born. Which is why taking a run is far from a waste of time.
more...
No comment yet.
The Daily Leadership Scoop
leadership skills for work and daily living
Curated by Bobby Dillard
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

7 Essential Tips for Effective 1 on 1 meetings with Your Manager

7 Essential Tips for Effective 1 on 1 meetings with Your Manager | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

Effective 1 on 1 meetings can seem like an albino peacock at some companies: rarely seen, but potentially awesome.


Via Roger Francis, donhornsby
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, August 17, 4:24 PM
It’s not your manager’s fault if you have nothing to talk about in your 1 on 1 meeting. In fact, every time you come to your meeting with nothing to discuss, it makes them dread their 1 on 1 meeting with you a little more. It also gives them another reason to want to cancel, or fill the time with status updates. No one likes pulling teeth, and it can be excruciating to try to draw everything out of you. This is why it’s important for you to think about what you want to talk about. Don’t make your answer to, “what do you want to talk about?” a blank stare.
1
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Why You Need This One Trait to Build a Successful Company Culture

Why You Need This One Trait to Build a Successful Company Culture | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

How would you describe a superpower in the workplace? Words such as “inspirational,” “influential” and “powerful” would come to mind, but you would rarely think of “empathetic.”

 

Empathy is a skill which is often overlooked in the workplace. Determined by Frans de Waal as the “social glue that holds human society together,” empathy refers to the awareness of one’s own and other people’s feelings, needs and concerns. Having the ability to be empathetic has been proven to prevent poor morale, misunderstandings and conflicts, consequently enabling a person to build significant and long-lasting relationships with others. Empathy therefore is the underrated key ingredient for both personal and professional success.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 17, 7:22 PM

Having this skill is like having a workplace superpower.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 17, 11:45 PM
Empathy is perhaps the single most important trait that goes into a successful company! The expression of empathy, eagerness to know more about how your employees feel, the ability to find time for employees are all things that make your company a great place to work in. Unfortunately, the culture of empathy is the most overlooked one because of the need to compete and produce results. We have become mechanical in our dealings with subordinates and even colleagues! 
 
JASON CAVNESS's curator insight, Today, 2:29 PM
Empathy is a very important skill to build your company culture around.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

14 CEOs reveal the No. 1 job skill they look for in employees  

14 CEOs reveal the No. 1 job skill they look for in employees   | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

There's no shortage of career advice out there and everyone from your favorite self help gurus to your least favorite in-law thinks they're an expert on the subject. Good advice — useful, nuanced, and proven — is harder to come by. After all, it's tough to suss out what employers value in their workforce, or their applicant pool, without asking them directly. So we decided to do just that. Below, 14 CEOs reveal the skill they're most excited to see in an employee these days. Take note: Some of these will help you stand out at your current gig; others will give you an edge when you go to look for your next one.

1

Via donhornsby
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, August 16, 7:25 AM
Mike Whitaker, tech CEO, author of "The Decision Makeover": "The skill of adapting to what is changing , right now, preserves and drives a career. A career professional with the mindset of remaining adaptive expects the workplace and the customer to change tomorrow. So when the change occurs, they're already prepared. Those are the people I want working for me."
 
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

What Makes Teams Resilient

What Makes Teams Resilient | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
In our conversations about work topics like productivity, effectiveness, role or technology, and innovation are top of mind. We are much less comfortable drilling down deep into the most difficult and uncomfortable moments in our careers, getting honest, and holding ourselves accountable to moving forward after a setback. If we were to ask—what makes a good life? We would likely not talk about the usual suspects. It is not about fame, wealth, or popularity. Even as a culture of personality and the siren call of social widgets and apps beckon us daily into showmanship, the recipe for a good life comes down to simple things like social connections in real life, the having close relationships, and their quality. When we are in relationships where we feel part of things, have a good dialogue with each other, and we feel we can count on others we thrive. As Antoine d
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

This is the No. 1 trait of great leaders, says Wharton's top professor

This is the No. 1 trait of great leaders, says Wharton's top professor | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
The less you care about your own success, the more successful you will be.

That's according to Adam Grant, organizational psychologist, top-rated professor at Wharton business school and author of The New York Times best-selling books "Give and Take," "Originals" and "Option B."

"One of the things that stands out for me when I think about what distinguishes the greatest leaders of our time, is that success is very rarely a goal for them, it's a byproduct of other goals that they have," Grant, who has studied thousands of leaders in his career, tells CNBC Make It.

"They say, 'Look, the most meaningful way to succeed is to help other people succeed, to advance a vision or an idea or a project that is bigger than me, that's going to affect a lot of people,'" explains Grant.

"And then the bigger you aim there, the more you focus on doing something that's going to benefit others, the more likely you are to produce something that's also going to achieve success for you."

Via Mel Riddile
more...
libertopereda's curator insight, August 11, 3:50 PM
Community Concern. Focus in a vision that goes beyond "my" organization to impact the world positively. Key competence of #integralleadership #leadingforvitality
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

Hiring Mistake #1: Your Job Description is Worthless

Hiring Mistake #1: Your Job Description is Worthless | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
In my last post, I mentioned that I would take the Study we did within the Vistage/TEC CEO and Senior Executive Community on Hiring Failure before we
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from New Leadership
Scoop.it!

Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style

Ask Yourself These 5 Questions Before Deciding On A Leadership Style | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

First-time managers often ask themselves how to develop a leadership style that suits them: “Who should I model myself after? What kind of leader should I be?” It’s great to think critically about your approach to managing others, particularly when you’re new to it, but these questions won’t exactly help you.

 

That’s because they assume that leadership is something you try on and show off, a “style” that’s curated and intentional. But especially in the beginning, your style will be based far less on mirroring others’ habits and behaviors and far more on instinct and intuition. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing.


Via The Learning Factor, Roger Francis
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 8, 6:58 PM

To develop a leadership style that’s authentic to you, let it take shape organically, not through intentional curation.

Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

Workplace Culture and the KISS Principle

Workplace Culture and the KISS Principle | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
By Gerald R. Wagner
Being from the Midwest, I’m used to people talking in plain and simple terms. And now that I practice in the field o
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

Awesome 1:1s: Bad advice about 1:1s to avoid (and what to do instead)

Awesome 1:1s: Bad advice about 1:1s to avoid (and what to do instead) | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
1:1s are an essential habits for great managers. Unfortunately, there's a lot of bad advice out there about them. We share the keys to great 1:1s.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Coaching Leaders
Scoop.it!

Why Taking Responsibility Is Always the Best Leadership Choice

Why Taking Responsibility Is Always the Best Leadership Choice | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
The main goal of choosing to take ownership of the issue to begin with was ensuring everybody could get back to work and resume pre-crisis levels of productivity and pride in their jobs. Don’t allow an issue to define you, or the organization. Everybody has lots to do – especially you. While you have to learn from your mistakes, avoid comparing every situation to the crises of yesterday. Stop yourself from reminding everybody constantly of what has already transpired. The issue occurred. You took responsibility for it, held people accountable and, with everybody’s help, you fixed it. You pledged not to make the same mistake again. It’s in your rearview. Keep it there. And get back to the exciting work of creating enduring value for all your stakeholders.

The next time you’re in the midst of a crisis, don’t try to deflect, or underestimate people, or nitpick about whose fault it was. Choose to take responsibility as the leader. Own the problem, take a hard-nosed approach, hold people accountable, present a solution, get to work, and don’t make the same mistake twice. You’ll stave off disaster, fix problems faster, build trust, and get better results.

Via David Hain
more...
David Hain's curator insight, August 3, 5:29 AM

Great advice from Doug Conant!

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 3, 2:11 PM
We teach through our examples and character. Pedagogy and educate etymologically come from leading. The virtues and character of a leader say more than their words.
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 3, 5:06 PM

I totally agree!

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

Be the Leader Of Your Boss: How To Work For Someone You Don’t Like

Be the Leader Of Your Boss: How To Work For Someone You Don’t Like | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
We've all worked for someone we didn't like before, whether it's because we didn't trust them, they threw their employees under the bus, said "go" instead of "let's go," or because they were just negative and condescending. Here you can learn some tactics to not only work through, but benefit from, your relationship with someone…

Via george_reed, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
george_reed's curator insight, July 18, 12:11 PM
It is indeed hard to work for someone you do not like or appreciate. Everyone has a role to play, and this blog provides some good advice. 
 
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Learning and HR Matters
Scoop.it!

Boomerang employees: should you welcome them back?

Boomerang employees: should you welcome them back? | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

Former employees who want to come back to an old job form an increasingly common pool of job applicants, write Brad Harris and Richard Gardner


Via Roger Francis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

5 Leadership Mistakes Even the Best Bosses Make

They may be great and smart, but they're also human and will make mistakes.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Sports | Education | Modern Toys | Business | Entrepreneurship | Innovation | Sustainability
Scoop.it!

How Managers Drive Results and Employee Engagement at the Same Time

How Managers Drive Results and Employee Engagement at the Same Time | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
It’s not about experience.
Via Paulo Camargo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

Why Business Leaders Need to 'Tune in' to Their People

Why Business Leaders Need to 'Tune in' to Their People | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
'Tuning in' means empathy, the ability to see things from another's perspective. Do you have this vital skill?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Surviving Leadership Chaos
Scoop.it!

What Some Leaders Don't Want To Hear About Culture

What Some Leaders Don't Want To Hear About Culture | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
As a leader, if you don’t like the culture that exists in your organization, you must understand your role in it, and your ability to address it.
 

Via donhornsby
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, August 16, 7:32 AM
The reality is leadership defines culture. People look to the leadership for their role models, for guides on how to behave. This goes for everything accountability, punctuality, sexual discrimination, etc., etc., if the boss practices these then the rest of the team will feel comfortable to follow suit. The leader sets the tone for whats acceptable. This is true for both positive traits as well as the negative traits mentioned above.
 
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

Good Leaders Are Good Learners

Good Leaders Are Good Learners | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
Our research on leadership development shows that leaders who are in learning mode develop stronger leadership skills than their peers.

Building on Susan Ashford and Scott DeRue’s mindful engagement experiential learning cycle, we found that leaders who exhibit a growth mindset diligently work through each of the following three phases of the experiential learning cycle.

First, leaders set challenging learning goals in the form of “I need to learn how to…” For some leaders, the goal might be to become more persuasive or to be more approachable. With a goal in mind, leaders can identify opportunities to make progress toward it. These could include a new project, an international assignment, a job rotation, or simply striving to approach routine encounters in a fundamentally different way.

Via Mel Riddile
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Hire Top Talent
Scoop.it!

Hiring Mistake #5: Would You Interview the Same as Picking a Heart Surgeon?

Hiring Mistake #5: Would You Interview the Same as Picking a Heart Surgeon? | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

A major mistake occurs in the hiring process when interviewing candidates. There is a tendency to equate, extrapolate, and extend experience to be the same as results. There is an enormous gap between experience and results. Historical experience.


Via Barry Deutsch
more...
Barry Deutsch's curator insight, August 9, 11:27 PM

Would you invest the same amount of time, due diligence, and focus as you would if you had to interview heart surgeons to work on you? Probably NOT. Most hiring executives VIOLATE the old adage to hire slowly. Usually, the decision to hire is made with minimal data and information. This error/mistake helps lead to the statistic of 50/50 probability in hiring. When will you no longer accept random results from the hiring and interviewing process?

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from IT and Leadership
Scoop.it!

How New Managers Can Send the Right Leadership Signals

How New Managers Can Send the Right Leadership Signals | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
One of the most exciting and — sometimes anxiety-producing transitions in a career — comes when you move from being an individual contributor to becoming a manager. At this juncture, what you think, what you say, and how you show up — in effect, your leadership presence — can have a direct impact on those you are now leading and managing for the first time. So, as a new manager, how do you build an authentic and connected leadership presence that has a positive impact on your team and colleagues?

Via Steve Krogull
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from New Leadership
Scoop.it!

Want People to Try Harder on Work Teams? Focus On These 3 Perceptions

Want People to Try Harder on Work Teams? Focus On These 3 Perceptions | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

TYhe nature of teamwork in today’s organizations is evolving. Our research shows that both team leaders and team members have a key role to play in this evolution. As a part of our survey we asked people to identify the conditions that impact the level of effort they put into the teams they work on. (See Figure 1: My Personal Effort Depends On))

When it came to conditions that affect how much personal effort individuals put into their role as a team member, the top three statements respondents most agreed with were:

Whether I trust the other team members


The level of support I get from my team leader


Whether or not team members are allowed to share opposing opinions and disagree with each other


Via Roger Francis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Learning At Work
Scoop.it!

4 Meeting Mistakes You're Probably Making and How to Fix Them

4 Meeting Mistakes You're Probably Making and How to Fix Them | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

Meeting etiquette lessons for everyone from interns to CEOs


Via Roger Francis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

Leaders need “User Manuals” – and what I learned by writing mine

Leaders need “User Manuals” – and what I learned by writing mine | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
A few years ago I read an article by Adam Bryant, the “Corner Office” Columnist for the New York Times, that led with this provocative question: “What
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Leadership development
Scoop.it!

8 talent management trends for 2018 | HR Trend Institute

8 talent management trends for 2018 | HR Trend Institute | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
When you ask CEO’s and CHRO’s what their key priorities are for the coming year, talent management always is one of the issues high on the list. Talent management is an easy and safe choice. Nobody will argue that talent management is not important. Supervisory Boards love to talk about succession and talent management. Talent management is generally seen as something long-term. When you hear terms as “strategic”, “long-term”, “future” and “investment”, you must be careful. For talent management this means: it is important, but not urgent. For the CEO, it means: I have ticked the box, but now HR can deal with it. Of course, I will visit the final session of the senior management program, of course, I will personally mentor one or two high potentials, but please, do not bother me too much about talent management, I have more urgent matters on my plate.  A big challenge for organisations is to make talent management urgent, and to make it a priority of today, not of the future.

Via David Hain, Jerry Busone
more...
David Hain's curator insight, July 31, 6:09 AM

Tom Haak of HR Trend Institute on how to get more form your talent in 2017.

John Ludike's curator insight, August 1, 4:03 AM
Talent & Future of work Trends everywhere
Jerry Busone's curator insight, August 2, 7:31 AM

Big trend is to focus on today ...  it is no longer necessary to divide the workforce in crude segments (“High Potentials”, “Middle Management”, “The older employees”). Moved people based on today, give potentials a chance earlier and have an organic approach to development .

Rescooped by Bobby Dillard from Supports for Leadership
Scoop.it!

12 Truly Inspiring Company Vision and Mission Statement Examples

12 Truly Inspiring Company Vision and Mission Statement Examples | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

Where does customer loyalty come from?


When you successfully create a connection with your customers and employees, many of them might stay loyal for life -- and you'll have the chance to increase your overall profitability while building a solid foundation of brand promoters. But achieving that connection is no easy task. The companies that succeed are ones that stay true to their core values over the years and create a company that employees and customers are proud to associate with.


That's where company vision and mission statements come in. A mission statement is intended to clarify the 'what' and 'who' of a company, while a vision statement adds the 'why' and 'how' as well. As a company grows, its objectives and goals may change. Therefore, vision statements should be revised as needed to reflect the changing business culture as goals are met.


Check out some of the following company vision and mission statements for yourself -- and get inspired to write one for your brand.


Via Jeff Domansky, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 18, 10:38 AM

Check out these inspiring company mission statements from businesses that have stayed true to their core values.

homeplatedusty's comment, July 20, 2:22 AM
thanks
Scooped by Bobby Dillard
Scoop.it!

Is Modern Leadership Missing the Point?

Is Modern Leadership Missing the Point? | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it
By focussing solely on growth and progress, could modern leadership be missing the point? Matthew Jones makes a case for a broader, more ambitious vision.
more...
No comment yet.