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leadership skills for work and daily living
Curated by Bobby Dillard
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The Enormous Cost of Unhappy Employees

The Enormous Cost of Unhappy Employees | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

A few weeks ago, we talked about why happiness at work matters; this week I'd like to share the flip side of that: the gigantic cost of unhappy employees.

 

 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 27, 2014 6:47 PM

Most business owners know that unhappy employees cost you money, but you'll be shocked at how high that cost actually is.

Paulette Steele's curator insight, August 28, 2014 8:44 PM

This is something no to be taken for granted

HOTEL CASINO INTERNACIONAL's curator insight, August 28, 2014 11:49 PM

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5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You

5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

In addition to all of your achievements, you're sure that you're a great boss. After all, your leadership skills have helped you climb the ladder of success. But some of the world's top companies succeed in spite of poor leadership, a result of great products or concepts rather than motivated team members.

 

According to entrepreneurial counselor Michelle McQuaid, bad bosses cost businesses $360 billion in lost productivity every year. The stress caused by difficult supervisors can negatively affect an employee's overall health and workplace morale, eventually driving him or her out the door. Since losing one employee costs a business tens of thousands of dollars or more, your business will eventually suffer financially if you can't keep employee loss at a minimum.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 18, 2014 6:50 PM

If you look closely, you may find indications that you're not as popular with your staff as you think you are.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:16 PM

I wonder if in School we consider that 1/2 of new teachers leave the profession within 7 years? That does not account for those who obtain a degree and never enter the classroom. What does that mean in relationship to high staff turnover?

 

One way to look at leaders who are not liked is are they leading or managing. We need both, but I found many School managers focused on managing people and avoiding leading.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, August 19, 2014 10:15 PM

PDGLead

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Your Company Is Only As Extraordinary As Your People

Your Company Is Only As Extraordinary As Your People | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

There is nothing more powerful than employees’ passion and initiative to make customers happy to spark long-lasting word of mouth about your brand. Your company is truly only as great as the people who embody the mission of your organisation, those who go above and beyond to see the company succeed and to make your customers happy. The brands that understand this fundamental principle empower their employees.


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Serena Zimmerman's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:41 PM

This goes for Any Business that you are in today.

Michael Wilcox's curator insight, December 13, 2013 5:26 PM

Winning words for todays competitive business world - "Success is a team sport. It requires dedication, inspiration, and passion; and one can never get that without cultivating the culture of trust, mutual respect, and empowerment."

Christopher Ray's curator insight, December 14, 2013 10:14 PM

It's all about your people!

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Uncomfortable Being the Boss? 5 Tips That Will Help

Uncomfortable Being the Boss? 5 Tips That Will Help | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

1. Don't pretend you're not really in charge.

 

If the buck stops at your desk, acting like you're the same as everyone else won't work. It's a bit like parents who try to function as their children's friends, rather than as authority figures. It may be more fun in the short run, but will likely lead to bad results in the long run.

 

There are a very few exceptions--one is Morning Star, the tomato processor that has rigorously maintained a non-hierarchical structure since the 1970s. But that takes a lot of forethought, planning, and careful hiring of like-minded individuals. And even so, the company's non-CEO founder must occasionally serve as decider of last resort when employees are unable to resolve their conflicts.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 19, 2014 7:47 PM

Being the top decision-maker doesn't always feel right. Here's how to make it better.

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How to Help an Underperformer

How to Help an Underperformer | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

Don’t ignore the problem


Too often these issues go unaddressed.  “Most performance problems aren’t dealt with directly,” says Weintraub. “More often, instead of taking action, the manager will transfer the person somewhere else or let him stay put without doing anything.” This is the wrong approach. Never allow underperformance to fester on your team. It’s rare that these situations resolve themselves. It’ll just get worse. You’ll become more and more irritated and that’s going to show and make the person uncomfortable,” says Manzoni. If you have an issue, take steps toward solving it as soon as possible.

 


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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 24, 2014 12:36 PM

The assumption often is that poor performance is  result of some problem with the performer, but it would be wise to examine the circumstances closely because is it a common bias for people to attribute others failures to them and de-emphasize the situation factors that may be contributing.   Compounding this, we as managers often are biased in seeing our own success as the result of our efforts and failures as a result of happenstance and not our shortcomings— making it still harder for us to see how we might contribute to others' poor performance. 

Tony Phillips's curator insight, June 24, 2014 9:25 PM

A great article worth practical ways to improve performance. ALL managers should be coached to do this type of thing.

Jill Miller, SPHR's curator insight, June 26, 2014 6:39 PM

It's tempting to delay dealing with under performers, but they rarely improve on their own. This article provides actionable advice that works in the real world.