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leadership skills for work and daily living
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What Makes a Good Leader?

What Makes a Good Leader? | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

When discussing business leadership, the distinction between good management and good leadership is often made. Managers are thought to be the budgeters, the organizers, the controllers — the ants, as one observer puts it — while leaders are the charismatic, big-picture visionaries, the ones who change the whole ant farm. 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 18, 5:24 PM

Leadership comes in many shapes and sizes, and often from entirely unexpected quarters. In this excerpt from the HBS Bulletin, five HBS professors weigh in with their views on leadership in action.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 21, 6:02 AM

Distinction between Leaders and Managers

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The Three Measures of Your Leadership Success

The Three Measures of Your Leadership Success | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

Are you a successful leader? This is a difficult question to answer: No matter how good you think you are, the only evidence of leadership is whether people follow you. Self-serving bias distorts your perception of your own successes and failures. Even if you’re incredibly self-aware, you may have trouble with an objective assessment because your direct reports may only appear to be following — they don’t get an option to be physically present — and not every company conducts rigorous engagement surveys or 360-degree reviews.

So how can you gain a reasonably accurate understanding of your success as a leader? Try integrating three distinctive views.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 12, 4:34 PM

Assessing your effectiveness requires looking simultaneously at the past, the present, and the future.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, January 12, 11:16 PM

A very powerful insight into three principal areas for leaders to work on, the now, the tomorrow and then the past in exactly that order! Performing well in the present times, meeting targets should have an impact on what you plan for the future, five years, ten years or so. Similarly, according to the writer, it is also important to look back at your past. Take stock of what went well, what went wrong, and what could have been done differently. It is also about connecting to past co workers and staying in touch with previous organisations.

Elías Manuel Sánchez Castañeda's curator insight, January 13, 2:10 PM

Are you a successful leader?

 

According to Business Strategy:

“This is a difficult question to answer: No matter how good you think you are, the only evidence of leadership is whether people follow you”.

 

I agree.

As heads many of us complain that our employees do not have the performance needed by the company and we expect. Although often we spend a lot of time in training them to develop their competencies (knowledge, skills, attitudes and values). If the results (performance of your employees) are not satisfactory, I think that there are at least two reasons that have to do with bosses or owners of the company:

He could not make a good selection and is now trying a person who does not have the profile nor the desire to be, to become a model employee.Not a genuine leader, not leading by example and values, it is not prepared permanently, you want results (transformation of its employees) in the very short term, although many people do not believe me some owners "enjoy" chaos and / or are afraid of success.

Of course there are other reasons (poor performance of employees) originated in the culture of the country, poor training in universities, inept governments and / or corrupt, but this does not absolve the responsibility of the OWNER-LEADER OR HEAD -LEADER.

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How to Hire for Emotional Intelligence

How to Hire for Emotional Intelligence | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

We know from research (and common sense) that people who understand and manage their own and others’ emotions make better leaders. They are able to deal with stress, overcome obstacles, and inspire others to work toward collective goals. They manage conflict with less fallout and build stronger teams. And they are generally happier at work, too. But far too many managers lack basic self-awareness and social skills. They don’t recognize the impact of their own feelings and moods. They are less adaptable than they need to be in today’s fast-paced world. And they don’t demonstrate basic empathy for others: they don’t understand people’s needs, which means they are unable to meet those needs or inspire people to act.


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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, February 8, 5:02 AM

Excellent text and methodology. More about people management can be read at http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com, in portuguese.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, February 8, 7:23 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

Adele Taylor's curator insight, February 8, 4:15 PM

What kind of hire to you make?  Do you base your hires on IQ or EQ, both are important, but for me emotional intelligence is critical when making hiring decisions, especially at a senior level.

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Your First 5 Minutes With a New Hire

Your First 5 Minutes With a New Hire | The Daily Leadership Scoop | Scoop.it

OK the following is likely to take more than five minutes no matter what kind of company you run, but what's important is that you cover it right from the start and that the message is clear to new employees and stays with them.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 13, 2014 6:14 PM

You make a new hire and his first day arrives. What you do and say in the first five minutes sets the stage for the recruit to succeed or fail at your company so be clear.