The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media
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The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media
A Scoop.it based on the opening chapters of Jose Van Dijk's The Culture of Connectivity.
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Pronounce Names - Pronounce Van dijk, How to pronounce Van dijk, How to pronounce the name Van dijk, Pronunciation of Van dijk, how to say Van dijk, how to say the name Van dijk

Pronounce Names - Pronounce Van dijk, How to pronounce Van dijk, How to pronounce the name Van dijk, Pronunciation of Van dijk, how to say Van dijk, how to say the name Van dijk | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
Pronunciation of Van dijk, How to pronounce Van dijk
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

Pronunciation: von Dayk


The Dutch letter 'ij' is pronounced closer to the 'ay' in 'day' than the 'i' in bike, and the 'a' in 'van' is the same as the 'a' in 'swan.' So 'van Dijck' rhymes with the English 'swan lake.'

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An overview of the social media ecosystem - Forbes

An overview of the social media ecosystem - Forbes | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
Nowadays, the web is all about Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr... But seven years ago, all these services didn't exist, portals and search engines where still king. So what happened during this period?
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Who Should You Hire? LinkedIn Says: Try Our Algorithm - Forbes

Who Should You Hire? LinkedIn Says: Try Our Algorithm - Forbes | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
The algorithms are coming! LinkedIn devises a new way of using big data to help recruiters find the best job candidates.
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

Some seriously scary van Dijckiness right here!


Some highlights:


LinkedIn has upended corporate recruiting in the past decade, allowing talent scouts to scour a vast database of 200 million people’s career profiles. That was just the start. Now LinkedIn has created algorithms that might do the sorting even more nimbly. The result: a digital cheat-sheet for recruiters, called:  “People You May Want to Hire.”


Fruits of the new algorithms won’t be visible to ordinary users of the workplace social network, who get a basic service for free. Instead, the latest offering is aimed exclusively at LinkedIn’s best customers: the 16,400 enterprises that buy LinkedIn’s top-of-the-line profile-searching system, known as Recruiter.


Before such products existed, Barrile said, 100% of users’ job prospecting was based on their own searches. Now, he said, more than half  of job prospecting is driven by what the algorithms recommend.


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Twitter Integrated in Another Apple Operating System

Twitter Integrated in Another Apple Operating System | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
ProgrammableWeb.com keeps you up to date with web mashups and APIs: what's new, interesting, useful and important. Hundreds of mashups and APIs. Contribute, search, view, and chart them.
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

While van Dijck certainly discusses APIs and "interoperability," she does not devote much space to "dissassembling" operating systems that incorporate social networking platforms on the most fundamental level of user/technological engagement.

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The Johnny Cash Project

For the complete work please visit www.TheJohnnyCashProject.com THE JOHNNY CASH PROJECT IS A UNIQUE COMMUNAL WORK, A LIVING PORTRAIT OF THE MAN IN BLACK Through…...
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

At times, van Dijck's writing veers towards an unholy alliance of PE and technological determinism.  Users are left to hopelessly negotiate a social networking labyrinth constructed out of neoliberal economics and algorithms. 


The Johnny Cash Project represents a kind of flip side to this argument.  If we are willing to "take off our tin-foil hats" (I love it, Neal!) for a moment, we can see the wide range of cultural and individual expression afforded by social networking platforms despite stringent economic, technological, stylistic and formal restrictions.


BTW, here are the TOS:


the Johnny Cash Project
Website Terms of Service

Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained on this site:

1. You are the creator here. As a creator, you are granted rights by United States copyright law. We want to respect your creativity and those rights, by asking you for as little as we can to make our project possible.

2. Respect for the creator whose work you are remixing requires that we first make clear that nothing that you, or we, will do gives either you, or us, rights to the underlying video frames. The rights to those are retained by the copyright owners of those frames. They have given us the right to run this project only if we expressly acknowledge that they retain the right to control the subsequent use of those frames.

3. Respect for our project requires that you give us the right to use your creative work (the “Created Frames”) for our project. In particular, the lawyers require that you expressly grant us the non-exclusive right to use the created frames in any manner in perpetuity on a gratis basis.

4. By granting us non-exclusive rights, you also retain the right to exploit your Created Frames in any way you'd like, consistent with your grant to us, subject to one thing we are asking you not to do: We need you to promise that you won’t combine multiple Created Frames (created by you or others) for exploitation as moving images. Beyond that single promise to us, you're free to sell your work, or share it, or invite others to remix it, or whatever. In doing so, please keep in mind that we are not able to give you what lawyers call “the rights to Johnny Cash’s image or likeness.” If your Created Frames were made from video frames with Johnny Cash’s image or likeness you may also need permission from the Johnny Cash Estate.

5. Unfortunately, there is another exception to these rules. Our contracts with the rights holders for Johnny Cash: Ridin the Rails (frame numbers 35-111, 762-784, 933-967, 1274-1319) and archival footage frame numbers 3-28, 644-665 and 723-739 have not given us the permission to allow you the same rights. They require that you transfer all rights to anything you create based on those frames to us. We are sorry about this restriction.

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Rhizome | Search by Image

Rhizome | Search by Image | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
Rhizome is dedicated to the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology.
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

Sebastian Schmieg's Search by Image (2011) provides an interesting visual representation of Google's search algorithm.


"Search by Image" is a series of algorithmic and experimental videos analyzing Google's image search function of the same name. "Search by Image (Recursively, Transparent PNG, #1)" begins with an empty image. This image – a transparent PNG – served as the sarting point for an image search, whose result acted as the basis of yet another search. This recursive process was repeated 2951 times and then compiled into a video. While the video opens room for a lot of interpretation, what we actually get to see is a glimpse of Google's databases and secret algorithms. Other videos start with a photo of the artist himself, or with a search result for "earth". The experiments will be repeat over time.

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mevr. prof.dr. J.F.T.M. (José) van Dijck - Universiteit van Amsterdam

mevr. prof.dr. J.F.T.M. (José) van Dijck - Universiteit van Amsterdam | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it

José van Dijck is a professor of Comparative Media Studies  at the University of Amsterdam.

After completing her BA and MA at the University of Utrecht , she received a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Her graduate and postgraduate work was supported by Fulbright and AAUW  grants.

Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

Some background on Dr. van Dijck, including a short biography, a list of publications and her CV.

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1984 Apple's Macintosh Commercial (HD)

"1984" is an American television commercial which introduced the Apple Macintosh personal computer for the first time. It was conceived by Steve Hayden, Bren...
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

"Apple computers in 1984 showcased the Macintosh as a tool for user empowerment, casting the company as a rebel amid powerful computer industries and, by implication, positioned the Max customer as a denizen of the counterculture.  The ultimate irony of this promoted image was that the Macintosh was a closed and controlled system, 'like something designed by Big Brother rather than by a hacker'" (Chapter 1.3).


I have some issues with this passage: 


1. It does nothing to contextualize the appearance of the Macintosh in the larger field of home computer technology.  At the time, the market was dominated by IBM PCs and IBM clones.  Consequently, given van Dijck's logic, the Mac could be seen to offer one of the first notable challenges (alternatives) to the techno-cultural hegemony imposed by IBM.


2. She ignores the fact (again, fails to historically contextualize) that this iteration of the Macintosh (as well as the Lisa and Xerox 8010 before it) represents one of the first home computers to employ a graphical user interface (GUI).  This is, of course, part of what made them unique (like Ridley Scott's colorful female protagonist).  Since then, GUIs have become the norm.  So, isn't it worth mentioning how this particular phase in the evolution of home computing technology has impacted "its quotidian users' tactics," and "shaped people's everyday life?" (Chapter 1.2)


3. Relatedly, van Dijck pays little attention to the role of operating systems in general (the words "operating system" only appear twice throughout the entire book).  See next curated entry.


4. Yes, closed systems impose limitations.  However, many users find them to be easier and more convenient to use.  To invoke the old Mac vs. PC argument (and the Anderson/Wolf article), closed systems "just work better."  Overly complex and unstable systems discourage wide swaths of potential users on a very basic (no pun intended) level.


5. In general, the book devotes little discussion to the complicated relationships between transparency, technological complexity and user agency-- even though van Dijck tells us, "Technology, user agency and content are the three fibers that platforms weave together in order to create the fabric of online sociality" (Chapter 2.3).  If a text, platform or application is too complex, people won't engage with it (van Dijck alludes to this in discussions of TOS).  So, how should techno-hegemons make their increasingly complicated business models transparent to users (and give them a real choice) without alienating them?



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Dealing With Facebook's Unfriendly New Algorithm | zowchow.com

Dealing With Facebook's Unfriendly New Algorithm | zowchow.com | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
Back in August I posted a story with a link on the Hitched Facebook page and it reached 48 percent of our fans—you know, the people who “liked” our page...
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

Sometimes, it seems, algorithms are not entirely transparent on either end of the user/brand continuum.

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#Theseus

#Theseus | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
Starting this Friday, January 29th, at 9am, I will attempt to walk from 59th and Lexington to Times Square, and back.
You are welcome to join at any point, and/or play online using #Theseus.
The...
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

In some ways, Man Bartlett's #Theseus performance art event seems to represent a physical manifestation of van Dijck's social media labyrinth.

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Man Bartlett

Man Bartlett | The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media | Scoop.it
is an artist with a website
Erik K. Clabaugh's insight:

More Man Bartlett and digital interactive media.

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