The Cultural Hegemony of English
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The Cultural Hegemony of English
In this globalized world, we all accepted that the global langauge is the english, no way to refuse generally. There must have concrete truth why this englsih dominate the whole world. for the country like Myanmar, being a british colony, english language is exactly dominant. According to Gramsc's hegemony, langauge doesn't not simply dominate but along with it, culture and ideology of english spread into the country. This idea is totally right in the brithish colonial era in Myanmar. But nowadays, the ideology of people is not so strong , but they still regard english is very important, that the culture and ideology is not totally effective for the Myanmar eventhough there is language hegemony in the country
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Rescooped by Khin Thuzar Myint from The Cultural Hegemony of English
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Language, culture, and the dominance of English | Macmillan

Language, culture, and the dominance of English | Macmillan | The Cultural Hegemony of English | Scoop.it

The ELF (English as a Lingua Franca) movement could be seen as a response to the growing dominance of English in global communication. ELF doesn’t get a very good press in Paul Emmerson’s post on the subject, but the ELFers make a good point when they advise “native-speakers” to avoid culturally-loaded words and expressions which are likely to be unfamiliar to many of the people they’re dealing with. But ...


Via Nicos Sifakis, Khin Thuzar Myint
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Rescooped by Khin Thuzar Myint from English as an international lingua franca in education
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Language, culture, and the dominance of English | Macmillan

Language, culture, and the dominance of English | Macmillan | The Cultural Hegemony of English | Scoop.it

The ELF (English as a Lingua Franca) movement could be seen as a response to the growing dominance of English in global communication. ELF doesn’t get a very good press in Paul Emmerson’s post on the subject, but the ELFers make a good point when they advise “native-speakers” to avoid culturally-loaded words and expressions which are likely to be unfamiliar to many of the people they’re dealing with. But ...


Via Nicos Sifakis
more...
No comment yet.