Corneas & Contacts
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Bowman’s layer transplantation shows promise for keratoconus

Bowman’s layer transplantation shows promise for keratoconus | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
SAN DIEGO — Bowman’s layer transplantation reduced or stabilized corneal ectasia in eyes with keratoconus that were not eligible for corneal collagen cross-linking or intracorneal ring segments, according to a study presented here.
“Historically, the treatment of keratoconus was limited to fitting contact lenses for as long as possible . . . and the patient was normally referred
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Another potential option for keratoconus. The Eyeglass Factory offers contact lens options including Scleral Lenses.

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Your health: Slow, deep breathing may help with dry eyes

Your health: Slow, deep breathing may help with dry eyes | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Abdominal breathing, a muscle-relaxation technique, may help people with dry-eye disease produce more tears, says a small study.While another study says long lashes could be detrimental.
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Mellow out for dry eye relief 

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Dry Eye Syndrome

Dry Eye Syndrome | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
While working on computers, consciously blink. It helps spread your own tears more evenly.
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Great advice for dry eyes

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Bionic eye: 3D printing merges contact lens and QLEDs - CNET

Bionic eye: 3D printing merges contact lens and QLEDs - CNET | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Quantum dots have been successfully 3D printed into a contact lens, allowing the lens to project beams of light.
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Hmmm. Bionic eyes getting closer

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Contact lens discomfort linked to changes in lipid layer of tear film

Contact lens discomfort linked to changes in lipid layer of tear film | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Changes in the lipid layer of the eyes' natural tear film may contribute to the common problem of contact lens discomfort, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.
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Spray your way to contact lens comfort

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Taiwanese girl's corneas devoured by amoebae after reusing contacts for 6 months

Taiwanese girl's corneas devoured by amoebae after reusing contacts for 6 months | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
A young Taiwanese woman was found to have both her corneas
Lorne Kashin's insight:

Contacts are medical devices. Don't become complacent. Have your contact lenses and corneal health monitored by your Licensed Optician The Eyeglass Factory.

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7 Things You Can do Right Now to Protect Your Vision

7 Things You Can do Right Now to Protect Your Vision | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
The majority of us spend a lot of time in front of digital devices. Here are ways to protect your eyes from damage caused by the light emitted from screens.
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See your Licensed Optician - Protect and Enhance Your Vision

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Lorne Kashin's curator insight, April 23, 2014 7:46 PM

Control light- See your Licensed Optician

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Possible Link To Glaucoma In Newly Discovered Eye Layer - Health News - redOrbit

Possible Link To Glaucoma In Newly Discovered Eye Layer - Health News - redOrbit | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
A new layer in the human cornea — discovered by researchers at The University of Nottingham last year — plays a vital role in the structure of the tissue that controls the flow of fluid from the eye, research has shown.
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The more we understand, the more we will see.

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The contact lenses worn at night that mean you'll no longer need reading glasses

The contact lenses worn at night that mean you'll no longer need reading glasses | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
The lenses work by gently pressing on the eye to restore it to the shape of someone with normal vision, say researchers reporting in the journal Optometry and Vision Science.
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Mono vision works for some.
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Experts Blame Smartphones, Office Buildings for Epidemic of Dry Eye

Experts Blame Smartphones, Office Buildings for Epidemic of Dry Eye | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
More people are landing in their doctor's office complaining of gritty, irritated and burning eyes. No, it isn't allergies or an eye infection. It's dry eye, which doctors say is reaching epidemic proportions.
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Treating the cause not the symtoms.

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Eye Health

Eye Health | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Corneal ulcers are severe infections caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi. They occur most often in patients who use extended-wear soft CLs. A corneal ulcer can be seen as a white or gray round spot on the cornea that is visible with the naked eye.
Lorne Kashin's insight:

Contact lens wearers require the instruction and folow-up care of an Eye Care Professional

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Used contact lens solution hosts complete ecosystem of microbes and viruses

Used contact lens solution hosts complete ecosystem of microbes and viruses | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
"Virus factories" and more are found in an amoeba within contact lens fluid.

 

In July of last year, researchers in France described a rather disturbing example of what could happen if you're not careful about cleaning your contact lenses. A 17-year-old patient had been wearing monthly lenses well past their expiration date, and rinsing them with a cleaning solution she'd diluted with tap water. The end result was an eye infection. Luckily, a bit of care managed to clear it up.

 

In the meantime, the people who treated her dumped some of the solution out of her contact lens case and started trying to culture any parasites that would grow out of it. In the end, they got an entire ecosystem—all contained inside a single strain of amoeba. Among the parasites-within-parasites were a giant virus, a virus that targets that virus, and a mobile piece of DNA that can end up inserting into either of them.

 

When they first grew the amoeba from the contact lens cleaning solution, they found it contained two species of bacteria living inside it. But they also found a giant virus, which they called Lentille virus. These viruses have been known for a while, and they tend to affect amoebas, so this wasn't a huge surprise.

 

More recently, however, researchers discovered these viruses can get viruses. Or, more precisely, virophages. Upon infecting an amoeba, the giant virus builds what's become called a "virus factory" within the cell, where its genetic material is copied and new viruses are built from parts encoded by its genes. The virophages can spread from amoeba to amoeba, but once they enter the cell, they head straight for the virus factory, where they get replicated.

 

When the scientists sequenced the genome of the Lentille virus, it had a few surprises for them. To begin with, it contained a new virophage of its own, which they called Sputnik 2. An infected amoeba would release virophage particles, suggesting that the virus could move between these organisms on its own. But the authors also found a copy of the virus inserted into the giant Lentille virus genome. And, if an amoeba were infected with one of these giant viruses, it would also start producing the virophage.

 

In other words, the virophage has two ways of spreading. Like any other virophage, it can spread from amoeba to amoeba, and will find a home in any that also contain a Lentille virus. But once it finds one, it inserts itself into its giant viral genome, ensuring that any future amoeba it infects gets a copy of the virophage, too. Although it has a preference to jump into the giant virus genome, it can hop elsewhere. That could potentially cause mutations and speed up the evolution of its host.

 

But that wasn't the only parasite the authors found in Lentille virus. A shorter sequence, one containing six genes, was also associated with the viral genome. As with the virophage, this sequence was found as both a free-standing piece of DNA and inserted into the genome of the Lentille virus. But there was a rather significant difference: none of the genes it carried encoded the sorts of proteins that are used to package a virus. Instead, it had several features normally found in transposons, mobile genetic elements that hop around the genomes of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals.

 

As if there weren't enough names to deal with, the authors deemed this DNA element a "transpoviron," for a transposon that targets a virus. They showed that, shortly after an infection with a Lentille virus, its resident transpoviron would be copied out of its host genome, form into circle, and start making copies of itself. These copies were then available to insert into genomes of any other viruses that were around—there's even some evidence that a copy inserted into Sputnik 2 in the past.

 

By looking at the sequences of some other giant viruses, they also concluded that Lentille virus isn't alone in carrying these molecular parasites.

 

The authors conclude by painting a picture of the giant viruses as supporting an entire DNA-based ecosystem of mobile genetic elements, which spread to other amoebas (and other viruses) by a variety of means. Given that we've found so much so shortly after starting to look, the authors suggest that we've likely only scratched the surface of its diversity.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Review of Optometry® > The Evolution of Dry Eye

Review of Optometry® > The Evolution of Dry Eye | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Our understanding of dry eye has become more sophisticated in recent years. So too should our approach to care. 
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Long before computers, hand held devices, and air conditioning

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A real tearjerker

A real tearjerker | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
A search for medical needs in eye clinics led Stanford Biodesign fellows to develop an implantable neurostimulator that painlessly increases natural tear production.
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Relief for extreme dry eye patients?

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The patient perspective

The patient perspective | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
The online home of the AOP, Optometry Today and CET for the optometry profession and industry.
Lorne Kashin's insight:

Contact lens wearers- Don't be complacent. Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is real. You can lose your sight.

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New therapy helps fight corneal disease

New therapy helps fight corneal disease | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Lorne Kashin's insight:

Another option for Keratoconus. For  contact lens fitting options visit the Licensed Opticians at The Eyeglass Factory

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How to Cope with Tech-Related Dry Eyes

How to Cope with Tech-Related Dry Eyes | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Do you constantly check your smartphone? Read a tablet? Use a computer? Well then you might want to pay attention… for the sake of your eyes! Doctors are reporting a massive increase in patients w
Lorne Kashin's insight:

See the Licensed Opticians at The Eyeglass Factory for your options to help make your electronic experience clear and comfortable.

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Jing Sun's Occupational health and Safety's curator insight, July 27, 5:37 AM
Kids and computers are nearly inseparable these days. With many school-age kids and even preschoolers spending hours in front of a computer every day, it's worth considering what effects computers might have on our children's eyes and their vision.
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A second look at dry eye syndrome

A second look at dry eye syndrome | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Surface scientists question current treatment of common eye condition
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Promising new perspective

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Smarter Contacts, No More Needles | The Scientist Magazine®

Smarter Contacts, No More Needles | The Scientist Magazine® | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Nanotechnology could transform the way clinicians treat eye diseases.
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Too dry, or not too dry – that is the question

Too dry, or not too dry – that is the question | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Contact lens ocular discomfort
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Daily Wear contact lenses eliminate a possible cause of discomfort.

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OOA Contact Lens & Low Vision Symposium 2013- Sunday October 6

OOA Contact Lens & Low Vision Symposium 2013- Sunday October 6 | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
OOA Professional Learning Series Fall 2013 Continues! The Ontario Opticians Association continues to provide professional development this fall with our bi-annual Contact Lens and Low Vision Sympos...
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Attention Ontario Opticians! Don't miss the professional learning event of Fall 2013

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Did all that time in the pool this summer harm your eyes?

Did all that time in the pool this summer harm your eyes? | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
You've spent the summer swimming and diving in the pool, but did all that splashing around in chemically treated water harm your eyes?
Lorne Kashin's insight:

Wear your goggles. Available in prescription @ The Eyeglass Factory, Thornhill

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Dry eye clinic brings new, breakthrough treatments to Regina

Dry eye clinic brings new, breakthrough treatments to Regina | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Technology is part of the problem AND part of the cure for dry eye sufferers.
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Study shows nutritional formulation relieves dry eye symptoms in subgroup of women | Optometry

Study shows nutritional formulation relieves dry eye symptoms in subgroup of women | Optometry | Corneas & Contacts | Scoop.it
Optometry | Daily dietary supplementation with a combination of omega fatty acids for 6 months is effective in improving ocular irritation symptoms and halting the progression of inflammation that characterizes moderate to severe dry eye in...
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