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Partnering to Shape Commercial Aviation’s Next Century

Partnering to Shape Commercial Aviation’s Next Century | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
IATA has emphasized the importance of industry-government partnership as the industry embarks on the second century of commercial aviation. Tyler suggested five guiding principles for governments when developing regulations: (1) to consult broadly, including industry and consumers; (2) ensure a rigorous process for analyzing the costs and benefits of any new regulation; (3) ensure regulations do not conflict with global standards where they exist; (4) harmonize so that regulations are not at cross-purposes with a global industry; and (5) to think what is really going to deliver value to the passenger.
Raelene Mcguire's insight:

 

IATA has emphasized the importance of industry-government partnership as the industry embarks on the second century of commercial aviation.

 

"The most salient lesson of commercial aviation’s first century is the value of partnerships. Through partnership, industry and government made flying the safest way to travel. This is a good guide as we look ahead to aviation’s next century. No matter what the challenge, solutions built in partnership between industry and government are the most durable and yield the best results," said Tony Tyler, IATA’s Director General and CEO, in his keynote address at the Singapore Airshow Aviation Leadership Summit.

 

In a keynote address, Tyler highlighted opportunities for partnerships in designing regulation, growing connectivity and planning for sustainability.

 

Regulation

 

Aviation needs a regulatory framework that supports its global activities.

"I am concerned about the negative impact of growing regulatory divergence and the proliferation of "unique approaches" to regulating the industry. While they were created with the best of intentions, they often come with the unintended consequences of complexity and bureaucracy," said Tyler.

 

Tyler suggested five guiding principles for governments when developing regulations: (1) to consult broadly, including industry and consumers; (2) ensure a rigorous process for analyzing the costs and benefits of any new regulation; (3) ensure regulations do not conflict with global standards where they exist; (4) harmonize so that regulations are not at cross-purposes with a global industry; and (5) to think what is really going to deliver value to the passenger.

 Passenger Rights: The impact of the multitude of passenger rights legislation is a growing concern. "It is fully understandable that governments wish to set some minimum guarantees to protect passengers. But the absence of a global framework on passenger rights has seen some 50 countries implement passenger rights regimes. The result is becoming an unmanageable mess of conflicting and over-lapping rules. In some cases, regulations are becoming so prescriptive that airlines cannot go the extra mile for their passengers," said Tyler.

 

At the 2013 IATA Annual General Meeting, airlines endorsed a set of principles for passenger rights. And at its last Assembly, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) was tasked to develop global standards for passenger rights regulations.

 

Connectivity

 

Industry, individuals and governments are united in the desire for global connectivity. Today the air transport industry operates a network of some 40,000 routes over which 3.3 billion people and 50 million tonnes of cargo will be carried in 2014.

 

"Our world is more connected than ever, but we are also nowhere near our potential. If the propensity to travel in Asia matches the level seen in developed markets, we would expect a market four-times the current size," said Tyler.

Tyler noted that the expanding middle class in developing markets is the biggest growth opportunity for aviation. However, he warned that the opportunity would only be realized if governments understand aviation’s role as an economic catalyst and actively build a policy environment in which it can be successful. He highlighted taxation and infrastructure as two specific areas of concern:

 

 Taxation: "Aviation should pay its fair share of tax. But taxing aviation at levels equal to the ‘sin’ taxes applied to alcohol and tobacco makes no sense. Connectivity stimulates business that provides tax revenues, but a draconian tax like the UK Air Passenger Duty (APD) hurts the UK economy. Every family that forfeits a long-haul vacation because of the APD also impacts jobs in the destination countries. It may be a UK tax, but the impact is global," said Tyler, who also highlighted the high fuel taxes in India, and proliferation of facility fees for substandard facilities and occasional over-built facilities across Africa.

 

 Infrastructure: Efficient infrastructure in sufficient supply is a critical building block for connectivity. This is largely understood in Asia which noted for its many world-leading airports. The region is also moving forward with a Seamless Asian Sky initiative aimed at ensuring sufficient airspace capacity to accommodate growth efficiently. "But there are challenges. The potential markets of Manila, Jakarta, Mumbai lack the infrastructure to support the economic benefits that aviation can deliver. In Europe, airports in general cannot be expanded fast enough, with the onerous approvals process often leading to projects being abandoned. And the advancement in the much needed Single European Sky is being prevented by state governments mired in a web of vested interests," said Tyler.

 

Environment

 

Lastly, Tyler reiterated the industry call for a global approach to managing aviation’s climate change impact.

The aviation industry has established clear targets on the environment: to achieve a 1.5% improvement in fuel efficiency annually to 2020; to cap net emissions with carbon neutral growth from 2020 and to cut net emission in half by 2050 compared to 2005 levels. This will be achieved through a four pillar strategy involving better technology, infrastructure and operations and a global mechanism for market based measures. At the recent ICAO Assembly, governments agreed to develop a framework for a global market-based measure by the 2016 Assembly.

 

"Delivering a global framework for market based measures by the 2016 Assembly is no small task. Governments will need to work together and focus their efforts to move this forward. The resurrection of Europe’s plans to impose its regional Emissions Trading Scheme on aviation could distract governments and de-rail the process. Governments outside Europe made it crystal clear at the last assembly that a European regional scheme was unacceptable. The big prize of a global scheme is within grasp. Europe should focus on making that a success. It is what will drive the greatest benefit for theglobal efforts on climate change," said Tyler.

 

Singapore Airshow 2014

 

ASIATravelTips.com / TravelNewsAsia.com will be at the Singapore Airshow 2014. Check back for full coverage from that event including exclusive HD video interviews, press conferences, new technology, flight displays and much, much more on the A350 featured above.

 

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Travel agenda

Travel agenda | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
1. Shore thingCelebrity Cruises has recruited broadcaster Ben Fogle to design a series of shore excursions for the company's ships. Half-day options include taking a Sicilian gastronomic tour in Catania (£195), going Norwegian salmon snorkelling (£390) or embarking on a mini Croatian triathlon (£234).celebritycruises.co.uk/benfogle
Raelene Mcguire's insight:

Corliss Travel Agenda

 

 

1. Shore thing

 

Celebrity Cruises has recruited broadcaster Ben Fogle to design a series of shore excursions for the company's ships. Half-day options include taking a Sicilian gastronomic tour in Catania (£195), going Norwegian salmon snorkeling (£390) or embarking on a mini Croatian triathlon (£234).

 

celebritycruises.co.uk/benfogle

 

2. In the know

 

My Plus One launches on 4 March. The website connects travellers with like-minded locals in five European cities – Berlin, London, Amsterdam, Barcelona and Paris: £15 for a short meeting and £35 for a longer stint with an in-the-know resident. Register your details on the website to find out more.

 

www.myplusone.net

 

3. Art house

 

Rotterdam hosts its Art Week from 5-9 February. Unique to the Dutch city's event is the chance to spend the night in an artist's home or studio. In return for €60 per guest or €100 for two, hosts will create a special place to sleep and serve breakfast the next morning.

 

wakeupinit.com

 

4. Ernest escape

 

Meliá Hotels has launched a new Madrid property in the former home of Ernest Hemingway. Built in 1956 and opened by the Swedish royal family, it became the Scandinavian country's enclave in Madrid, before the peripatetic writer moved in. Today, the Inside Suecia contains 127 minimalist rooms, a Dado Deli, rooftop pool and bar.

 

melia.com

 

5. Ebook out

 

The Independent Traveller has produced an eBook compilation of 48 Hours... city guides. Discover the perfect way to spend two days in 20 dazzlingly different European capital cities, with great accommodation, restaurant and cultural tips for all budgets. The ebook is priced £2.99.

 

independent.co.uk/ ebooks

 

6. Wild wizard

 

This month, animal actors from the Harry Potter films will return to the Warner Bros Studio Tour near Watford. From 14-24 February the attraction will feature some of the 250 creatures that appeared in the movies, including the cat that played Mrs Norris and the snowy owl that played Harry Potter's pet, Hedwig.

 

wbstudiotour.co.uk

 

7. Terminal tango

 

From 2 April, Delta switches three of its key routes from Heathrow – serving New York JFK, Boston and Seattle – from Terminal 4 to Terminal 3. The move will improve connections with partner airline Virgin Atlantic's services.

 

delta.com

 

8. Family travel

 

This month, a £10 discount is being offered on the normal £30 cost of a Family & Friends Rail card. The card confers a 33-per-cent reduction on most adult train fares and a 60 per cent on fares for children who travel with them. To take advantage of the discount, use code HALFTERM10 when booking online by 24 February. (Read more Here)

 

railcard.co.uk/halfterm

 

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Corliss Group Travel: Tips for Travelling with Kids in Europe

Corliss Group Travel: Tips for Travelling with Kids in Europe | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it

When parents tell me they're going to Europe and ask me where to take their kids, I'm sometimes tempted to answer, "To Grandma and Grandpa's on your way to the airport."

 

It's easy to make the case against taking the kids along. A European vacation with kids in tow is much more about playgrounds and petting zoos than about museums and churches. And traveling with kids can be expensive. Out of exhaustion and frustration, you may opt for pricey conveniences like taxis and any restaurant with a child-friendly menu. Two adults with kids can end up spending twice as much to experience about half the magic of Europe.

 

But traveling with kids, you'll live more like Europeans and less like tourists. Your children are like ambassadors, opening doors to new experiences and countless conversations. With kids, you'll be forced to discard your tourist armor and become a temporary European — as a parent.

 

Some of my best travel memories wouldn't have happened without my kids. Because my son was in the car, I once detoured to watch a "Petit League" baseball tournament in southern France — and debated ball and strike calls behind home plate with a pan-European bunch of parents. I'm no horseman, but because my daughter had her heart set on it, I've trotted along leafy bridle paths in the Cotswolds (next time I'll wear long pants).

 

Let the kid in you set the itinerary, and everyone will have a good time. Somehow even the big-ticket family attractions — the kind I normally avoid — have more appeal in Europe.

 

Europe's Disneyland, outside Paris, has all the familiar rides and characters. But Mickey Mouse speaks French, and you can buy wine with your lunch. My kids went ducky for it. With upward of 15 million visitors a year, Disneyland Paris has become the Continent's single leading tourist destination.

 

Also a hit, but on a more Danish scale, is Legoland, a fun sight for kids (lots of them blond) and their parents. Sixty million of the plastic bricks are arranged into extraordinarily detailed depictions of such wonders as Mount Rushmore, the Parthenon, and "Mad" King Ludwig's castle. Anyone who has ever picked up or stepped on a Lego will marvel at these meticulous representations.

 

Nostalgic parents and their children enjoy Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen, which recently celebrated its 150th birthday. This 20-acre park is happily and simply Danish, without commercial glitz. You pay one admission price and find yourself lost in a genteel Hans Christian Andersen wonderland of rides, restaurants, games, marching bands, roulette wheels, and funny mirrors.

 

Certain European cities seem built for kids. London eliminates the language barrier, and has some of the best museums for children — the Natural History Museum (dinosaur bones), Victoria and Albert Museum of Childhood (toys, doll houses, and games going back to the 1600s), and Science Museum (hands-on fun). Hyde Park, London's backyard, is the perfect place for kids to play, ride bikes, and run free. My kids enjoyed the pirate-themed playground.

 

Barcelona bubbles with inexpensive, quirky sights and an infectious human spirit. There's a fun, hill-capping amusement park, "magic" fountains that put on a free light-and-sound spectacle most summer nights, a chocolate museum (no explanation needed), and one of Europe's best urban beach scenes.

 

Venice doesn't need an amusement park — it is one big fantasy world. It's safe and like nothing else your kids have ever seen. Riding a vaporetto across the lagoon to the Lido, Venice's beach island, is nearly as fun as the beach itself.

 

Another canal-lined city, Amsterdam, has a special charm for kids. Its electric trams are an enjoyable ride, as are the boats that tour the canals. At NEMO, the kid-friendly science museum, it's forbidden not to touch. Older kids will want to make a pilgrimage to the house where Anne Frank wrote her famous diary.

 

Whichever city you are in, take advantage of the legacy of Europe's royal past: spacious parks and an abundance of castles. Give in to your inner toy soldier and line up with your kids for the changing of the guard at Prague's Castle or London's Buckingham Palace. Take a picnic break in Berlin's sprawling Tiergarten Park, once a royal hunting ground. Vienna's formerly royal Prater Park tempts young and old with its sprawling amusement park, huge red Ferris wheel, and miles of green space.

 

Because my parents imported pianos from Germany, our family travelled there when I was a kid, during my "wonder years" — when travel experiences fed and shaped my core values about the world and my place in it. If you can afford it, do the same for your kids. Getting your children comfortable in the wider world is great parenting.

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Robbed in Barcelona? What I did + tips to beat the pickpockets - BudgetTraveller

Robbed in Barcelona? What I did + tips to beat the pickpockets - BudgetTraveller | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
        I thought I’d share with you my experience of being robbed in Barcelona from early last year. I wouldn’t wish this to happen to anyone visiting this great city. Below you’ll find some tips of how to avoid the pickpockets and ideas of what to do if you have the misfortune [...]
Raelene Mcguire's insight:

I thought I’d share with you my experience of being robbed in Barcelona from early last year. I wouldn’t wish this to happen to anyone visiting this great city. Below you’ll find some tips of how to avoid the pickpockets and ideas of what to do if you have the misfortune of being robbed.

 

Remember: In all situations, keep calm and don’t lose your head……. Unless of course you are Liam Neeson

 

 

Disclaimer:  I like to state loud and clear that despite my experience of being pickpocketed – I love Barcelona.


Let me state this loud and clear.

 

I love the city. It has a raw energy.

 

The people are passionate and interesting.

 

The food- tapas bars here are amazing.

 

Night life now. The night never ends in Barcelona.
Plus this city is bursting with creativity and vibrant, innovative ideas.

Inspired by Gaudi, the citizens have a zest for challenging boundaries and living life to the fullest.

 

So it was a massive letdown when last year, on my 5th visit to the city I fell prey to a growing menace in Barcelona -pickpockets.

 

It had been a long day of travelling.

 

A last minute meet up with a friend had fallen through because of a miscommunication in dates.

 

I was kind of upset because I was looking forward to catching up with her.

 

Suddenly, my first evening in Barcelona seemed empty and vague.


I grabbed the airport express train from El Prat to Placa Catalunya.

 

After emerging from the escalator I walked towards La Ramblas in search of my hostel for the night.

 

It’s only when I got into my hostel room that I noticed that my wallet had vanished.

 

First a feeling of disbelief and denial.

 

I checked my pockets 20,000 times, emptied my rucksack and suitcase a million times.

 

Suddenly, a nauseating feeling swept over me as I realized I had my wallet stolen.

 

Looking back, I was distracted while emerging from Placa Cataluyna Metro station.

 

I was busy trying to pull my suitcase in one hand and my rucksack on my back.

 

Plus I looked way too dapper for 530pm- suit and all.

 

I stuck out like a sore thumb from the crowd.

 

Someone there must have seen me as an easy target and true enough, I was the easiest person he/she must have pickpocketed.

 

This was because I had my wallet in the back pocket

 

Yep. I had kept my wallet in my back pocket. Read More Here

 

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Barcelona Safety: Essential tips how to safeguard your personal safety

Barcelona Safety: Essential tips how to safeguard your personal safety | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
The essential tips you must know to ensure a safe visit to Barcelona, Spain. Prevent scams, pickpockets and bagsnatchers from ruining your holiday. Don't be a victim of crime follow our safety steps now.
Raelene Mcguire's insight:
This is a difficult article to write because I don't want to scare people off from coming to Barcelona. By writing about safeguarding your personal safety in Barcelona and how to ensure you are not pick pocketed or robbed implies that the city is not safe. However it's true to say that there is a pick pocketing and bag snatching problem in Barcelona. So many times I walk down La Rambla and see tourists with maps open, looking lost and with their bags unguarded. These tourists will almost certainly be noticed by all the wrong people and be an instant target. You can be a tourist, no problem, but what you must behave like is a savvy tourist and you will be much, much safer. Please take these precautions to safeguard yourself. I know you may think it will never happen to you. You may even think that "all big cities are the same in this respect" but I would say perhaps think again. I see so many tourists that are leaving themselves wide open for something to happen and all they need to do is just take a few simple steps to help safeguard themselves. Is The Ramblas Safe? (The Ramblas is the main promenade through central Barcelona) In my opinion, the Ramblas is safe. At night (after 23:30) the south end of Las Ramblas (between the Grand Theatre Liceu and Colum) may be a little seedy but still relatively safe. However, if you're not comfortable, you can avoid this area at night. The rest of the Ramblas is pleasant to walk at night as thousands of people come to see street performances you should however still keep your witts about you on Las Ramblas. Credit should go to Barcelona town council that are taking steps to make the city safer for tourists. We have noted a significant drop in the number of site visitors writing in to us about thefts and robbery over the last year. This is not to say that there is no longer a problem - there is, but it does appear that things are defintely improving. Site Visitor Feedback from Jan in the UK I have lived in Barcelona for 18 years now ( drank from the fountain I'm afraid!) and I wanted to add my reassurances that Barcelona is indeed a safe city, however I would comment Spanish worry about their clothes and that people who live here don't ever dress in shorts on the metro or in centre of town .. to do so identifies you as a tourist.(Therefore increasing risks of being a pickpockets target) In restaurants don't leave your bag on the floor or hanging over your chair especially in Ramblas area as they will pick it up or quickly cut the strap. Thanks Jan - what you described actually happened to a friend of mine. She left her bag on the back of her chair. It was gone in minutes in a full restaurant with tables all around her. We still don't know how they managed to take her bag. If you want to know the "dress code" in Barcelona and what you should wear to blend in with the locals - see our Barcelona Dress Code Article Pick pocketing and bag snatching is a problem on the Ramblas, at rail stations, on the beaches and on the metro (subway). One visit to any police station will demonstrate that. Following the next 16 Safety Guidelines will radically reduce the chances of someone trying to pick pocket or rob you. We have compiled these guidelines after reading actual real events sent to us from site visitors. Each one of the guidelines will help protect you against the most common theft types. Read more here.
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The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency: Gems of South America

The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency: Gems of South America | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
Raelene Mcguire's insight:

http://www.corlissgroup.com/voyage.html?tid=00237

 

Buenos Aires offers you so much excitement. It is a colorful city with lots of interesting sites to see, night clubs, and the local venue is yours to enjoy! The beaches at Rio are wonderful and the harbor at Rio is surely one of the world’s most beautiful!

 

From either ports cities of Buenos Aires or Rio you may fly to the amazing Iguazu Falls which borders the countries of Argentina and Brazil.

 

Plan your luxury travel today at http://www.corlissgroup.com

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