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The Corliss Group Voyage Hong Kong, Top deals: Cruise with Shannan Ponton or Tim Webster, on Russian rivers or Melbourne’s biggest ever cruise shi

The Corliss Group Voyage Hong Kong, Top deals: Cruise with Shannan Ponton or Tim Webster, on Russian rivers or Melbourne’s biggest ever cruise shi | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
BRAD Crouch has sought out the week’s best cruise specials. These fabulous deals are sure to be snapped up fast.
alojiaminschii's insight:

BRAD Crouch has sought out the week’s best cruise specials. These fabulous deals are sure to be snapped up fast.

 

HONG KONG PLUS

 

CRUISE from Hong Kong to Sydney with stops in Vietnam, Singapore and the Top End aboard the 1990-guest Sun Princess. The package starts with a flight to Hong Kong and a night at the Citadines Ashley Hotel, followed by the 17-night cruise visiting Nha Trang, Ho Chi Minh City, Singapore, Darwin and Port Douglas before finishing in Sydney. The package departs on October 11 and is priced from $2499 a person, twin share.

 

LUXURIOUS RUSSIA

 

APT will introduce a newly refurbished Russian river cruise ship next year, which it promises is the most luxurious vessel to grace Russia’s waterways, with features such as five dining options and a pool with two hot tubs. APT is offering river cruises aboard the Anastasia as part of several itineraries for 2015, including the 14-day Russian Waterways from Moscow to St Petersburg via the Volga, Svir and Neva rivers. Priced from $7795 a person, twin share, highlights include sightseeing in Moscow and St Petersburg, visits to the Golden Ring cities of Uglich and Yaroslavl, as well as Goritsy, and lakes Onega and Ladoga.

 

FIGHTING SPIRIT

 

FEEL like a winner by getting health and fitness tips on a fun cruise with The Biggest Loser coach Shannan Ponton. Cruises on Carnival Spirit this winter will have Ponton on board helping with workouts and suggesting healthy meal options. Cruise to New Caledonia and Vanuatu with Ponton from $979 a person, twin share, on a nine-night cruise departing Sydney on July 23, or on an eight-night cruise to New Caledonia departing Sydney on August 12, priced from $909 a person, twin share.

 

ATLANTIC TRIP

 

NEW York, London, Paris and 5-star luxury in between feature on an escorted transatlantic cruise aboard the Queen Mary 2. Priced from $8500 a person, twin share, this 17-day trip departs September 24 and includes air travel to New York and return from Paris, a seven-night cruise aboard the QM2, three nights in New York, two nights in London, three nights in Paris, dinner and show at the Moulin Rouge in Paris and sightseeing tours in all three cities. The trip is hosted by TV personality Tim Webster.

 

BIG AND BEAUTIFUL

 

PRINCESS Cruises will base a record five ships in Australia next year, with the 2600-guest Golden Princess debuting down under as the biggest ship ever to have Melbourne as its home port. Its five-month season over 2015-16 will include holidays to New Zealand, the South Pacific and Tasmania, with fares starting from $1849 a person, twin share, for a 13-night New Zealand cruise. More than half of the 108,000-tonne ship’s staterooms have private balconies and it has four swimming pools, 10 restaurants and cafes and a spa.

 

 

weblink:
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/travel/holiday-ideas/top-deals-cruise-with-shannan-ponton-or-tim-webster-on-russian-rivers-or-melbournes-biggest-ever-cruise-ship/story-fnjjv4qv-1226895238361

 

 

browse this site:
http://thecorlisstravelgroup.blogspot.com/
http://www.pinterest.com/alexanderwaggon/the-corliss-group-luxury-travel-agency/

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Smartphone Travel tips with Corliss Group

Smartphone Travel tips with Corliss Group | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
When the smartphone was in its infancy and app stores were not yet operational, its best built-in app to help travelers was the Maps app. There were no walking directions provided, just a map that you needed to interpret to help you get to your destination.
alojiaminschii's insight:

When the smartphone was in its infancy and app stores were not yet operational, its best built-in app to help travelers was the Maps app. There were no walking directions provided, just a map that you needed to interpret to help you get to your destination.

 

These days, smartphones have so spoiled us that we wonder how we have lived without it.

 

For example, the technologically-advanced descendant of the first map app now features not only driving and walking directions, but also directions for those who take public transportation (for some countries, at least). This has made it easier for travelers to navigate through some foreign countries the same way that natives do.

 

With the right apps, you can turn your smartphone into an indispensable travel companion that can save you money; if your pockets cannot afford travel just yet, you can even do a little armchair traveling from your smartphone.

 

Below are some handy apps to have when exploring foreign territory:

 

Bla Camera Pro ($0.99, iOS)

 

Dubbed by its developers as "the worlds first smart camera," Bla Camera has something called P.E.A.R. Technology, which analyzes data like light and weather and consequently recommends a filter and setting based on your environment.

 

Camera Plus Pro ($1.99, iOS)

 

Camera Plus Pro is another alternative to your phones regular camera app which lets you tweak more settings. Apply filters and see the effects before snapping your photo; edit and share from within the app. You can also create a private folder to hide certain photos, like your balloon sleeves.

 

Google +

 

Fewer and fewer people whip out their cameras and prefer to shoot with their smartphones. If you are not the type to back up to clean up your photo album once in a while, you would likely find that your photos have eaten up your phones memory or storage capacity. If you left your laptop at home and are traveling with just your phone, enable your Google + account to automatically back up your photos; with your photos stored in the cloud, you will be able to free up space on your phone for more photos. Make sure however to enable this feature only on WiFi while abroad, as you might end up with a shocker of a phone bill if you are on a metered data roaming plan.

 

Google Maps (Free, iOS/Google Play)

 

This map just keeps getting better and better. As long as you have an Internet connection, you can use Google Maps to help you find your way around the city, even if it's your first time getting there. Get turn by turn directions, and click on "Street view," which will give you an actual view of your destination.

 

City Maps to Go (Free, iOS/Google Play)

 

If you want to navigate around a country but think that you might not always have Internet connection, City Maps 2Go's offline maps will save you from stealing paper maps in your backpack. The map includes points of interest as well as travel guides culled from Wikipedia. Get the pro version ($2.99 for iOS) for more maps and features.

 

VSCO Cam (Free, iOS/Google Play)

 

This camera app with a minimalist user interface brings photography in focus with its gamut of throwback analog filters (requires in-app purchase). Some of the filters were built to mimic the color and grain of various films.

 

Pin Drop (Free, iOS)

 

Never forget anything visit-worthy, thanks to this app. Mark favorite places you want to remember, revisit or recommend to friends.

 

Metro (Free, iOS)

 

If octopus-like train station systems befuddle you, take out the guesswork with an app like Metro. Download your chosen citys train system and let the app trace your path from point to point.

 

Official site: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/156124/smart-travel-tips-from-your-smartphone

 

Additional hints: http://lorton.patch.com/blogs/the-corliss-group-luxury-travel-agency

 

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13 Travel tips with Corliss Group for finding low airfares

13 Travel tips with Corliss Group for finding low airfares | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it

Airfares on some routes are higher than they were four or five years ago. Here's how to make your dollars go further.

alojiaminschii's insight:

No question about it, airfares on some routes are higher than they were four or five years ago, although Airfare watchdog airfare searchers frequently find hundreds of fares crisscrossing the country for $250 or less round-trip. And even though fares seem higher, let's not forget that, adjusted for inflation; most fares are actually lower than they were 10 or 20 years ago. That said, here’s my best advices for making your airfare dollars go further.

1. There’s no "magic" day or lead time to buy the best airfare.

A lot of airfare experts think they're clairvoyant, so they know where airfares are headed or how far in advance you should start looking for a fare. The latest myth is to buy exactly 54 days in advance.

2. So search often, over a long lead time, and pounce when there’s a deal!

Fares fluctuate throughout the day, and the number of seats offered at the lowest fares also changes frequently.

3. Get airfare alerts by e-mail

This is perhaps the easiest way to track airfares. Many travel websites offer e-mailed airfare alerts, letting you know when fares go down, and they all have something to offer.

4. Sign up for the airlines ' e-mail feeds and frequent flier programs

Speaking of promo codes, the airlines want to develop a relationship with you, so ethyl send you special deals, such as 50% of promo codes or two-fers, if you sign up for their e-mails.

5. Use Twitter

E-mail is great, but some of the most amazing airfare deals last only a short time (even if they're valid for travel over a long period), or you open the e-mail too late. Twitter is more immediate.

6. Be a flexible travel date flier

If you don't care when you go as long as the fare is low, try a flexible date search. It's getting harder to search airfares based on flexible travel dates now that many sites (Orbitz, Hotwire, Travelocity and Expedia among them) have eliminated their flexible date calendars. But Kayak.com still has a good one (you must register as a user to see it under Flights/more options/flex month).

7. Search airline sites individually, but online travel agencies are still useful.

Many airlines have "private" sales, reserving their very best fares for their own sites. These are different from promo code sales mentioned above.

8. Use Priceline for last-minute trips

If you don't have a 7-, 14-, or 21-day advance purchase window to buy your fare, your best bet is the "name your own price" feature of Priceline.com.

9. Use consolidators, but beware of the restrictions

Consolidators specializing in premium cabins will have some great deals, and the airlines themselves will often heavily discount their premium cabins in the summer and just before Christmas, so check the specials on their websites.

10. Consider the extra fees before you buy

If Southwest has a fare of $198 round-trip and United has one for $148, and you are checking three bags, and then Southwest actually has the lowest fare because Southwest charges nothing for the first two checked bags, whereas United would charge you an additional $165 each way for three.

11. Combine two separate fares rather than buying one fare

If your flying to a destination in Europe, you might save money by purchasing one fare from the U.S. to, say, Dublin, and another from Dublin onward on Ryanair.com (just beware of Ryanair's hefty fees.

12. Use alternate airports creatively

Is the fare from Miami to London Heathrow to high? See if flying from Ft. Lauderdale to London Gatwick on Norwegian Air Shuttle is cheaper (it probably is).

13. Buy tickets on an airline that will refund the difference if a fare goes down

Let's say you've found the lowest fare, and then the day after purchase your non-refundable fare for the same itinerary goes down. If you ask for it you can get a refund for the difference.

Go Here: http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/columnist/hobica/2014/04/01/how-to-find-airfare-deal/7122673/

Extra resources:
http://answers.oreilly.com/topic/21800-the-corliss-group-world-travelers-on-surviving-hong-kongs-wildest-sporting-event-of-the-year/
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1dfsns_the-corliss-group-luxury-travel-agency-barcelona-tourist-guide-the-easy-way-to-plan-your-trip_travel

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The Corliss Group Travel: How to save cash in Hong Kong

The Corliss Group Travel: How to save cash in Hong Kong | The Corliss Group Luxury Travel Agency | Scoop.it
Hong
Kong
is not exactly known for being cheap. The former British colony, perched on the
shore of the South China Sea, frequently graces ‘most expensive cities in the
world’ lists for its sky-hig...
alojiaminschii's insight:

Hong Kong is not exactly known for being cheap. The former British colony, perched on the shore of the South China Sea, frequently graces ‘most expensive cities in the world’ lists for its sky-high rents, acres of posh shopping malls, and dazzling displays of wealth (think Rolex shops on every other corner, women clutching Prada bags as they hail taxis, lapdogs in bejewelled collars).

 

But despite its glitz, the city still has plenty of bargains – provided you know how to find them. In general, Hong Kong Island itself is the most expensive part of town, while the Kowloon Peninsula across the harbour and the adjoining New Territories are gentler on the wallet.

 

The home to dim sum, brisket noodles, huge fluffy pork buns and other delights, Hong Kong abounds in budget eats. Wherever you go, the city has hole-in-the-wall restaurants with lines snaking out the door.

Unlike many Asian cities, Hong Kong does not have a huge street food presence these days. But just because you can’t see it doesn’t mean it’s not there – former street vendors now hawk their bowls of noodles, dumplings and braised chicken feet inside public ‘cooked food centres’. The unadorned concrete-and-tile design of these buildings can look a little forbidding, but they generally have produce, meat and fish markets on their bottom floors, and cooked food on the top.

 

When it comes to free things, you can’t beat nature. Those who haven’t visited Hong Kong before are often shocked by how green the city is. Sure, downtown and Kowloon are snarled masses of concrete and glass high-rises. But some 60% of the city is preserved green space, and you don’t have to go far to find it. The city is famed for its hiking, with hundreds of kilometres of well-marked trails. The Dragon’s Back Trail, one of Hong Kong’s most glorious hikes, traverses Hong Kong Island, following the ridgeline south, offering panoramic sea views. It ends in the village of Shek-O, where tired ramblers can chow down on cheap noodles and watch the waves slap the rocks.

 

On Wednesdays, many of the city’s museums are free. The Hong Kong Museum of Art is one of the best, with a comprehensive collection of Chinese pottery, calligraphy scrolls and paintings. From the museum’s Kowloon location, take advantage of another one of Hong Kong’s best freebies – the ‘Avenue of the Stars’, a seaside promenade which offers cheesy tributes to local film heroes, but whose real star quality is its gleaming view of the Hong Kong Island skyline. Every night at 8pm, crowds gather here for the (free) ‘Symphony of Lights’, a music-and-light show illuminating the skyscrapers across the water. It’s silly and slightly bizarre, but good fun.


Come bedtime, budget backpackers worth their salt should brave the infamous Chungking Mansions. This 17-story behemoth on Kowloon Peninsula’s teeming Tsim Sha Tsui district attracts people of such varied ethnicities, languages and clothing styles it’s earned comparisons to Star Wars’ riotous Mos Eisley cantina. On the ground floor, African and South Asian vendors hawk samosas and grey-market cell phones, while the higher floors are a concrete warren of restaurants, apartments, beauty parlours and budget guesthouses. Chungking House (www.chungkinghouse.com) is a longstanding favourite, with double rooms going for about HK$275.

 

Reasonably-priced guesthouses abound in the Yau Ma Tei and Mong Kong districts of Kowloon. Try Booth Lodge (www.salvationarmy.org.hk) a simple-but-clean spot run by the Salvation Army. A double will run you HK$1200.

 

If you’re yearning for some souvenirs, Hong Kong’s kitschy-cool street markets are chockablock with lucky cat statues, fake jade jewelry, vintage reproduction cigarette ads, fake designer handbags and more.

 

The Temple Street Night Market and the Ladies Market in Kowloon are perennial favorites, as is Cat Street on Hong Kong Island. Bargaining is both acceptable and expected. If you’re not happy with the price, try saying this: tai gwai la (Cantonese for 'it’s too expensive!').

 

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