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@The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Our Global Future in the 21st Century is based on "The Third Industrial Revolution" which finally connects our new ICT infrastructure with distributed energy sources that are both renewable and sustainable
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Gartner: Sony breach is a new breed of attack that needs new responses | Tim Greene | NetworkWorld.com

Gartner: Sony breach is a new breed of attack that needs new responses | Tim Greene | NetworkWorld.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The big lessons from the Sony breach are that businesses need better planning and to shift security investment away from trying to protect the network from attacks and toward quickly detecting and dealing with breaches, Gartner says.

That means hiring staff to deal specifically with that type of exploit, which Gartner gives a new name: aggressive cybersecurity business disruption attacks.

It also means training employees to use digital media safely, and may require investments in network architecture changes, encryption and tools such as endpoint threat detection and remediation platforms, Gartner says in a new report “Attack on Sony Pictures is a Digital Business Game Changer.”

The report says the Sony attack is a wake-up call. Because of the scope of damage this type of attack can wreak, businesses need to update their business continuity plans to pull in expertise beyond IT and security departments to include legal departments, human resources, corporate communications, and public relations. It should also include outside interests such as law enforcement and network service providers.


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Doing a little to curb fertilizer pollution could go a long way to breathing life back into the Gulf | Susan Cosier | onEarth.org

Doing a little to curb fertilizer pollution could go a long way to breathing life back into the Gulf | Susan Cosier | onEarth.org | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Every summer the fertilizer from corn and soybean farms along the Mississippi River drains from fields into rivers and streams. The nutrient-rich water flows south into the Gulf of Mexico and sits on top of the salty sea. There it feeds algae, which proliferate, die, and sink to the bottom. As the algae decompose, they use up much of the water’s oxygen, creating what we call a dead zone—where, as you might imagine, not much marine life (and the fishing industries that rely on them) can thrive.

Nitrogen alone accounts for 90 percent of the nutrients that leach into the Mississippi from the Corn Belt, a water-quality issue that has worsened as farmers use more commercial fertilizers and convert more land to crops. Despite efforts to cut back on how much fertilizer reaches the Gulf—mostly by limiting its use and planting cover crops like winter rye and clover to soak up nutrients—the 5,052-square-mile dead zone isn’t getting much smaller (it stubbornly remains the size of Connecticut).

According to research recently published in the Journal of the American Water Resources Association, however, that could change. If farmers take additional steps—like putting in wetlands, restoring the land around ditches and streams, and reconnecting rivers to floodplains—the researchers say they could reduce the amount of nitrogen washing into the Gulf and contract the dead zone to a fraction of what it is now.


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Telegram dimisses claim of a flaw in its secure messaging application | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

Telegram dimisses claim of a flaw in its secure messaging application | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Telegram, a messaging application that markets itself as a secure communication tool, doesn’t handle encrypted conversations securely, according to the founder of a mobile security company.

Zuk Avraham of Zimperium wrote in a blog post Monday that he found several weak points that allowed him to recover plain text messages.

Avraham didn’t try to directly crack messages encrypted by Telegram, which is backed by Pavel Durov, founder of the popular Russian social networking site Vkontakte. Instead, Avraham focused on an alternative attack using a kernel exploit to gain root access on an Android device and then looking at how Telegram handled messages in memory.

Telegram spokesman Markus Ra contends that Avraham’s attack is one that no application can defend against.

“If you assume that the attacker has root access—no app can be secure,” Ra said via email. “For example, in order to show anything on the screen, you need to put it [in] the device’s memory. An attacker with root access can simply read your device’s memory.”

System-level vulnerabilities such as the one used by Avraham for his research can only be fixed by an OS manufacturer, Ra said.

Attackers are more likely to try and find an OS-level flaw, which would then allow them to probe apps on the phone, Avraham argued in his post.


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UK: How a university's data center overhaul makes a green impact | Sharon Florentine | NetworkWorld.com

UK: How a university's data center overhaul makes a green impact | Sharon Florentine | NetworkWorld.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

To say that University of Cambridge deployed disparate and diverse data storage and data center infrastructure would be a vast understatement. In a 2013 IT review, data center manager Ian Tasker and his team discovered almost 200 servers across the University's 120 departments. These installations ranged from single servers housed in closets to larger rooms containing 20 to 30 servers, but all contributing to a major drain on power and cooling resources, as well as creating one heck of a management headache.

"Our IT review is a periodic way for us to look at how we're carrying out the responsibilities of IT, and how to best align IT with the work of the university. What we found was everything was fragmented and each department was doing their own thing when it came to provisioning, storage and management. Where we had a small number of racks, they weren't powered or cooled efficiently, and that was our other mission: to reduce our carbon footprint as a university by about 34 percent by the year 2020," Tasker says.

A £20 million (more than $30 million) data center overhaul and consolidation project was approved to address both of these challenges; standardizing and easing provisioning, storage and information management and increasing power and cooling efficiency, says Tasker.


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Catherine Devin's curator insight, February 25, 2:18 AM

Cambridge, référence mondiale et séculaire du monde universitaire, se montre aussi exemplaire dans la refonte radicale du système de stockage des données avec un investissement  de 27 M€ performant sur tous les volets, y compris le volet environnemental. 

A la clef, l'objectif de réduire l'empreinte carbone de l'université de 34% d'ici à 2020.

 

On l'a déjà évoqué et on a  vu des exemples. Il est naturel et essentiel que les universités et leurs étudiants s'inscrivent dans des démarches de développement durable -  tant pour expérimenter que pour contribuer à construire le monde dans lequel ceux-ci s'apprêtent à vivre.

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Apple plans two European data centers running on renewable energy Peter Sayer | NetworkWorld.com

Apple plans two European data centers running on renewable energy Peter Sayer | NetworkWorld.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Apple plans to open two European data centers running on renewable energy in 2017, following similar moves by Google and Facebook in the region.

The new data centers will host a number of Apple services for European customers, including the iTunes Store, App Store, iMessage text messaging service, Apple Maps and Siri, its voice-controlled personal assistant. By hosting the data within the European Union, Apple could avoid the need to export EU users’ data to the U.S. or other data protection regimes, a sensitive issue as EU legislators discuss renewing the bloc’s data protection regime.

Apple plans to spend a total of €1.7 billion (US$1.9 billion) on the two data centers, which will each cover around 166,000 square meters.

The company’s plans to use green power—in line with its policy in the U.S., where it has built photovoltaic plants alongside new data centers—will win it local allies, although other U.S. technology giants, including Facebook and Google, have already opened data centers on the continent with strong green credentials.


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UK: Foster + Partners' 250 City Road designed to get Londoners on their bikes | Stu Robarts | GizMag.com

UK: Foster + Partners' 250 City Road designed to get Londoners on their bikes | Stu Robarts | GizMag.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Gizmag covers lots of blue-sky building concepts for the cities of the future, but forward-thinking architecture is often just a matter of simple practicality. London's 250 City Road will enable its occupants to be more active, sustainable and frugal. The building is designed for cyclists.

Project architects Foster + Partners explains that the aim for 250 City Road is to turn what was a 1980s business park into a "high-density, low energy residential community." The development comprises two towers, seven blocks and one four-star hotel, all of which will be built over three phases.

The site is located in a busy central area of London, not far from the trendy areas of Old Street, Shoreditch and Hoxton. Given its location, the eventual occupants of 250 City Road will be able to reach much of central London by bike. Good transport links, meanwhile, ensure that occupants are well connected to other areas in the city and beyond, with it then being possible to make additional onward travel also by bike.


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Catherine Devin's curator insight, February 24, 3:32 AM

A la clef, la conversion d'un parc d'affaires construit dans les années  1980.

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Lenovo hit with lawsuit over Superfish snafu | Agam Shah | CSO Online

Lenovo hit with lawsuit over Superfish snafu | Agam Shah | CSO Online | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Lenovo admitted to pre-loading the Superfish adware on some consumer PCs, and unhappy customers are now dragging the company to court on the matter.

A proposed class-action suit was filed late last week against Lenovo and Superfish, which charges both companies with "fraudulent" business practices and of making Lenovo PCs vulnerable to malware and malicious attacks by pre-loading the adware.

Plaintiff Jessica Bennett said her laptop was damaged as a result of Superfish, which was called "spyware" in court documents. She also accused Lenovo and Superfish of invading her privacy and making money by studying her Internet browsing habits.

The lawsuit was filed after Lenovo admitted to pre-loading Superfish on some consumer PCs. The laptops affected by Superfish include non-ThinkPad models such as G Series, U Series, Y Series, Z Series, S Series, Flex, Miix, Yoga and E Series.

Lenovo has since issued fixes to remove Superfish applications and certificates from PCs. Microsoft's Windows Defender and McAfee's security applications also remove Superfish since Friday.


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French Minister Thinks Netflix Needs To Pay ISPs A 'Bandwidth Tax' To 'Level The Playing Field' | Karl Bode | Techdirt

French Minister Thinks Netflix Needs To Pay ISPs A 'Bandwidth Tax' To 'Level The Playing Field' | Karl Bode | Techdirt | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

If you've followed the net neutrality discussion here in the U.S. since the beginning, you'll recall the debate began in earnest back in 2005 when then AT&T CEO Ed Whitacre declared that Google should pay an extra, arbitrary toll simply for using the AT&T network. By Whitacre's government-pampered, duopolist logic, any content company that so much as touches an ISP's network should pay a levy to offset infrastructure costs -- well -- just because. Soon, a seemingly endless array of hired telco flacks started telling anybody who'd listen that content companies were getting a "free ride" and really needed to start paying their "fair share."

As we've repeatedly explained (perhaps unnecessarily if you have anything resembling critical thinking skills), this reasoning is incoherent and stupid, since customers and content companies alike already pay plenty for bandwidth and infrastructure. Still, somehow Whitacre's absurd attempt to try and offload network operation costs to others went viral globally, and we've repeatedly seen overseas telcos trying to argue the same point ever since. Of course, whereas Google used to be the global telco whipping boy, we're increasingly seeing Netflix playing that role given its more vocal support of net neutrality.

It's the painfully dumb idea that just won't die. French Minister of Culture and Communication Fleur Pellerin has spent the last few years with an incumbent telco bug in her ear, demanding that she force Google, Netflix and other content companies to pay some kind of a "bandwidth tax." As we've seen here in the States, Google appeared willing to (at least temporarily) go mute on net neutrality, and as Glyn has noted previously, Google France appeared willing to trample neutrality principles, allowing some degree of ISP double dipping to protect mobile handset market share.


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Australia: NBN: The good, the bad and the downright unfair | Mark Gregory | Biz Spectator

At the end of last year the fanfare surrounding the signing of the revised Definitive Agreements between NBN Co and Telstra overshadowed the release of NBN Co’s Fibre to the Basement (FTTB) product technical specification.

The FTTB product technical specification gives us a first look at what the Coalition’s Multi-Technology Mix (MTM) National Broadband Network (NBN) will actually provide to customers.

NBN Co’s FTTB product utilises VDSL which is one step up the evolutionary ladder from the existing ADSL that most Australians have enjoyed (or not) for the past decade. VDSL, which is to be used in NBN Co’s Fibre to the Node (FTTN) roll out, does not provide the capacity, flexibility, quality of service and capability mix available when fibre is used.

However, it does offer a range of improvements over what is possible with ADSL.

To get a better understanding of what we will receive by spending a large part of $43 billion on what's ultimately a minor upgrade to existing infrastructure, we need to investigate NBN Co’s product technical specifications.


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All 6,000 Mosques in Jordan to Run on Solar Energy | Mihai Andrei | ZME Science

All 6,000 Mosques in Jordan to Run on Solar Energy | Mihai Andrei | ZME Science | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

As global oil prices continue to drastically fluctuate up and down over the years, the Kingdom of Jordan has announced that all of their mosques will soon run on solar energy, in an attempt to save money and promote sustainable development.


Jordan is a country almost devoid of natural resources – most of their land is completely barren. The Jordanian economy is beset by insufficient supplies of water, oil and other resources, and to make things even worse, they import 96% of the energy they use. Given their rough circumstances, I feel that this is definitely a good approach.

Ahmad Abu Saa, of the Renewable Energy Department at the ministry stated “that photovoltaic solar systems for power generation will be installed at the Kingdom’s mosques under a project to be implemented in the course of this year.” The project will start by covering 120 mosques and tenders will be soon floated to install such systems at other mosques across the country, he added. It may not seem like much, but mosques actually use a lot of energy.


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Stop the Keystone XL Pipeline Project | NRDC

Stop the Keystone XL Pipeline Project | NRDC | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

One of the world's richest forests stretches across northern Alberta, making the Canadian province home to a vast array of migrating birds, diverse wildlife, and the First Nations people who once thrived on the region’s natural bounty. But in recent decades, mining companies have torn up the land and polluted its waters in a quest to extract tar sands, which yield a heavy crude oil trapped in a mixture of sand and clay.

The fuel is dirty; the extraction and refining process is even dirtier. It's so energy-intensive, in fact, that tar sands oil is barely economical to bring to market.

That's why the industry is so desperate to build Keystone XL. The proposed $7 billion tar sands oil pipeline would run 2,000 miles across the American heartland, crossing the country's largest freshwater aquifer to reach the Texas Gulf Coast. There, refineries would process a projected 830,000 barrels of dirty crude daily, most of them bound for overseas markets, with negligible impact on U.S. energy independence or gas prices.

The new pipeline would be harmful for people, water, wildlife, and climate. Here are five reasons why Keystone XL is a bad idea and tar sands oil should stay in the ground.


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Bosnia & Herzegovina: BH Telecom expanding fibre infrastructure in six locations | TeleGeography.com

Bosnian operator BH Telecom has reportedly unveiled plans for the expansion of its fibre-optic network in six cities, according to Telecompaper.


With the infrastructure expected to be enhanced in Mostar, Konjic, Jablanica, Stolac, Capljina and Neum, as part of the telco’s next investment cycle, it has been claimed that BH Telecom has already started building the second part of the optical connection system in Stolac.


Specifically it has been claimed that around 15km of new fibre will be deployed to the centre of Stolac, allowing for future expansion of the network.

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Virgin Media Business and Arqiva partnership aims to boost UK’s 4G connectivity | TeleGeography.com

UK-based Virgin Media Business and infrastructure and broadcast transmission facilities provider Arqiva have announced a partnership under which they aim to ‘enable seamless 4G connectivity to city centres up and down the country’.


Under the partnership, the companies have said that some of the UK’s largest cities, including London, Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Bradford and Southampton, will soon benefit from improved 4G access as they jointly work to make it simpler and faster to deploy small cells that will improve connectivity for people on the go.

With the companies noting that they are able to provide mobile network operators access to over 400,000 street assets, including lampposts and CCTV cameras, they said that combined with Virgin Media Business’s high capacity fibre network and Arqiva’s expertise in wireless transmission, this will provide an end-to-end solution for small cell deployment.


British cellcos will reportedly then be able to use this service to extend the reach and depth of their networks, ensuring more people benefit from a high speed 4G experience.


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Head Of UK Parliamentary Committee Overseeing Intelligence Agencies Resigns After Being Caught In Sting | Glyn Moody | Techdirt

Head Of UK Parliamentary Committee Overseeing Intelligence Agencies Resigns After Being Caught In Sting | Glyn Moody | Techdirt | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The UK government's response to Snowden's leaks has been twofold: that everything is legal, and that everything is subject to rigorous scrutiny. We now know that the first of these is not true, and the second is hardly credible either, given that the UK's main intelligence watchdog has only one full-time member. There's one other main oversight body, the UK's Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament (ISC), which is tasked with examining:

the policy, administration and expenditure of the Security Service, Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), and the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).

The ISC was criticized as part of a larger condemnation of intelligence oversight by another UK Parliament committee. The head of the ISC, Sir Malcolm Rifkind, was reported by the Guardian as dismissing those criticisms as "old hat," as if that somehow made them acceptable. Rifkind has now been caught up in a rather more serious row, which involves reporters from the UK's Channel 4 and The Telegraph newspaper posing as representatives of a Chinese company:


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Many attackers lurk undetected for months, then pounce, study finds | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com

Many attackers lurk undetected for months, then pounce, study finds | Jeremy Kirk | NetworkWorld.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Attackers who penetrate company networks often pose as legitimate users for long periods of time, causing lengthy delays before victims figure out they’ve been hacked.

FireEye’s Mandiant forensics service found that it took a median of 205 days for an organization to detect a compromise, down slightly from 229 days in 2013, according to its 2015 Threat Report.

The drop is nearly insignificant. “I don’t think it’s enough to make a claim that people are getting better at this,” said Matt Hastings, a senior consultant with Mandiant who works on incident response.

One of the main problems is that attackers are moving away from using malware that can be quickly detected. Instead, they’re stealing authentication credentials and using them to log into systems remotely. In that way, they look like legitimate users logging into systems, which becomes difficult to detect.


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Mobile networks limber up for the Internet of Things | Stephen Lawson | NetworkWorld.com

Mobile networks limber up for the Internet of Things | Stephen Lawson | NetworkWorld.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Changes starting to take place behind the scenes in mobile networks may eventually pay dividends to anyone with a smartphone, a connected refrigerator or an IT department.

Carriers have done things pretty much the same way for years, with cellular base stations at the edge of their networks feeding into a series of specialized appliances at central facilities. Now they’re virtualizing those networks in several ways, seeking the same rewards that enterprises have reaped by virtualizing data centers: efficiency and flexibility. The trend will be in full swing at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona next month.

It’s good news for mobile users that they may not hear much about. A more efficient network leaves more free capacity for the video or application you want to run, and a more flexible carrier could quickly launch services in the future that you don’t even know you’ll need yet. The new architectures may even change how some businesses pay for mobile services.


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Here's where ocean acidification will hit U.S. coastal communities the hardest | Brian Palmer | onEarth.org

Here's where ocean acidification will hit U.S. coastal communities the hardest | Brian Palmer | onEarth.org | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The economy of New Bedford, Massachusetts, ground to a halt in the 1980s after a fleet of high-tech boats fished the region’s once-plentiful cod to exhaustion. Thirty years later, the city is experiencing a renaissance. Scallops have replaced cod, business is booming, and the local economy is riding the wave. Statewide, the value of the scallop catch has risen more than sixfold since 1993—part of the $1 billion-a-year U.S. shellfish industry.

“I would never have dreamed that things would be as good as they are,” a New Bedford scallop captain told The Boston Globe in 2013. “Ten years ago even, I would have never believed we’d be in this condition.”

What could possibly go wrong now? Plenty. A new study suggests that New Bedford is one of many U.S. coastal towns on the precipice of economic collapse—even if they don’t know it yet. The reason: ocean acidification.

Acidifying oceans are a result of carbon pollution. As carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere increase, more of that carbon dioxide dissolves in seawater. The dissolved gas increases the acidity of ocean. Approximately a quarter of the CO2 emitted by humans ends up in the sea, and scientists estimate that the pollution is causing oceans to acidify faster than they have in 300 million years.


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Thought Komodia/Superfish Bug Was Really, Really Bad? It's Much, Much Worse! | Mike Masnick | Techdirt

Thought Komodia/Superfish Bug Was Really, Really Bad? It's Much, Much Worse! | Mike Masnick | Techdirt | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

With each passing day, it appears that new revelations come out, detailing how the Komodia/Superfish malware is even worse than originally expected. If you don't recall, last week it came out that Lenovo was installing a bit of software called "Superfish" as a default bloatware on a bunch of its "consumer" laptops. The software tried to pop up useful alternative shopping results for images.


But in order to work on HTTPS-encrypted sites, Superfish made use of a nasty (and horribly implemented) "SSL hijacker" from Komodia, which installed a self-signed root certificate that basically allowed anyone to issue totally fake security certificates for any encrypted connection, enabling very easy man-in-the-middle attacks.


Among the many, many, many stupid things about the way Komodia worked, was that it used the same certificate on each installation of Superfish, and it had an easily cracked password: "komodia" which was true on apparently every product that used Komodia.


And researchers have discovered that a whole bunch of products use Komodia, putting a ton of people at risk. People have discovered at least 12 products that make use of Komodia.

But it gets worse. Filippo Valsorda has shown that you didn't even need to crack Komodia's weak-ass password to launch a man-in-the-middle attack, but its SSL validation is broken, such that even if Komodia's proxy client sees an invalid certificate, it just makes it valid. Seriously.


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Wind power overtakes hydro for first time in Australia | Giles Parkinson | REVE

Wind power overtakes hydro for first time in Australia | Giles Parkinson | REVE | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The Australian wind energy industry achieved a milestone in January, with wind generation exceeding hydro generation for the first time.

According to data compiled by Green Energy Markets, the wind industry boosted production to its highest level in six months -thanks to good wind speeds – while hydro generation fell sharply from previous years, mostly as a result of the carbon price repeal, which has removed much of the incentive for the hydro generators to increase production.


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Is this the fuel cell that will crack the code to the data center? | Katie Fehrenbacher | GigaOM Clean Tech News

Is this the fuel cell that will crack the code to the data center? | Katie Fehrenbacher | GigaOM Clean Tech News | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The controversial idea of using fuel cells to power data centers has been under discussion for the past couple of years. Probably the most famous project out there is Apple’s 10 MW fuel cell farm, which uses 50 fuel cells from Silicon Valley startup Bloom Energy installed next to its east coast data center in North Carolina.


But Microsoft is just starting to kick off a pretty unusual and innovative project using fuel cells and data centers that could some day draw a lot of interest. Microsoft is working with young startup Redox Power Systems and using a grant from the Department of Energy’s ARPA-E program, to test out Redox’s fuel cells to power individual server racks within a data center.


For a refresher, fuel cells are devices that take a fuel (usually natural gas or biogas) and oxygen and run these substances through a chemical reaction (using a catalyst and stacks of materials) to create electricity. It’s set up like a battery (with an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte) but it generates energy, instead of storing energy like a battery does.

Microsoft’s idea for its new fuel cell project is unusual because most of the limited number of fuel cells that are being used for data centers today — like the ones at Apple’s facility — have been installed in clusters outside of the data center, or in a separate area of the data center, away from the servers. This set up requires conversion infrastructure to convert the DC power from the fuel cell farm into AC power to be pumped into or around the data center, and then converted back into DC power to be used by the servers.

Microsoft’s plan is to essentially distribute lots of small fuel cell stacks down at the individual server level, delivering onsite energy, cutting out the conversion infrastructure and eliminating those costs. Without the infrastructure costs, Microsoft could in theory afford to potentially pay higher prices for fuel cells, which despite the best efforts of a handful of companies have long been pretty expensive compared to grid power.


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GuerillaStockTrading.com's curator insight, February 24, 10:19 AM

Demand for fuel cell technology growing. Since we can't invest in Redox Power, I like Ballard Power (BLDP) in this space and did a report here goo.gl/8C0cTz

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Mother Earth weeps as Arctic Circle ice cap slides into the sea. | DailyKos.com

Mother Earth weeps as Arctic Circle ice cap slides into the sea. | DailyKos.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The Austfonna ice cap is located in northeastern Svalbard within the arctic circle north of Scandinavia. "Roughly 28% of the ice cap bed lies below sea level and over 200 km of its southern and eastern margin terminates in the ocean [Dowdeswell, 1986; Dowdeswell et al., 2008], with parts resting on a retrograde slope."

Like most glaciers that terminate at the sea, warm water from the Atlantic is making its way north to the Arctic ocean (including Berants sea) where the warmth helps to melt the underside of the glacier which in turn causes thinning resulting in rapid retreat. This process is also exacerbated by melt water and bedrock warming. This is changing the flow dynamics of the glacier.

The Earth Story describes the dynamic change as follows:


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Arid areas of US face prospect of 'megadroughts' | Tim Radford | Climate News Network

Arid areas of US face prospect of 'megadroughts' | Tim Radford | Climate News Network | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The Central Plains and Southwest region of the US face “unprecedented” droughts later this century, according to new research.

While Midwest states have experienced ever more flooding over the last 50 years, the regions already suffering from extremes of aridity are being warned to expect megadroughts worse than any conditions in the last 1,000 years.

Climate scientist Benjamin Cook, of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, and colleagues report in a new journal, Science Advances, that they looked at historical evidence, climate projections and ways of calculating soil moisture.

They found that the drought conditions of the future American west will be more severe than the hottest, most arid extended droughts of the 12th and 13th centuries, which are thought to have played a role in ending the once-flourishing Pueblo culture of the American Southwest.


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U.K. Approves World’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm, Farthest Ever From The Coast | Ari Phillips | Think Progress

U.K. Approves World’s Largest Offshore Wind Farm, Farthest Ever From The Coast | Ari Phillips | Think Progress | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The United Kingdom has approved what will become the world’s biggest offshore wind farm, and one of the U.K.’s biggest power stations of any sort. When completed, the Dogger Bank Creyke Beck project will have a total generating capacity of 2.4 gigawatts, enough to power about 2.5 percent of the country’s electricity needs. Made of up two separate 1.2-gigawatt farms of up to 200 turbines each, the project will be located about 80 miles off the coast and occupy up to 430 square miles.

While final investment decisions are still being made, which will likely include backing by the U.K.’s renewable energy subsidy, Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey’s approval of the record-setting project is a major step forward, bringing the wind farm into the pre-construction phase.

“This development has the potential to support hundreds of green jobs and power up to two million homes,” said Davey. “Making the most of Britain’s home grown energy is creating jobs and businesses in the UK, getting the best deal for consumers and reducing our reliance on foreign imports. Wind power is vital to this plan.”

If and when it’s built, the project would far exceed the 175-turbine capacity of the London Array, currently the world’s largest operating offshore wind farm at 630 megawatts.


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Sweden: PTS finalises decisions easing broadband regulation | TeleGeography.com

Sweden’s Post and Telecom Agency (PTS) yesterday issued twin final decisions which ease regulation in wholesale broadband access markets, driven by positive competition developments as well as recent European Union (EU) recommendations.


In the market for ‘central access’ (market ‘3b’, including bitstream access) the existing regulatory obligations have been repealed altogether, whilst in the market for ‘local access’ (market ‘3a’, including local loop unbundling [LLU]) price regulation has been eased on fibre-based connections.

In the market for local access (3a) the PTS has enhanced the ‘obligation of non-discrimination’ (or EoI – Equivalence of Input). This means that the incumbent PSTN operator, TeliaSonera, will provide the same services and information externally and internally and on the same terms, within the same time frame and with the same systems and processes.


Under the new rules, on 1 December 2016 TeliaSonera will have implemented an ‘enhanced obligation of non-discrimination’ alongside the easing of price regulation for fibre access. Price regulation will subsequently be replaced by an obligation on economic replicability, meaning that TeliaSonera must not price discriminate on the wholesale market or unfairly squeeze retail market prices; other players may then compete on commercially reasonable terms.


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Russia: MTS extends 1800MHz LTE network to St Petersburg | TeleGeography.com

Mobile TeleSystems (MTS) has announced that it has switched on its new 1800MHz Long Term Evolution (LTE) network in St Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast, augmenting the coverage currently offered by its 800MHz and 2600MHz 4G platforms.


Around 10% of the cellco’s LTE base stations in the aforementioned areas have been reconfigured to support the new frequency band.

Previously, MTS launched LTE-1800 networks in Moscow and Moscow Region as well as Ufa.


Going forward, MTS plans to extend the 1800MHz service to other regions in the North-Western Federal District over the course of 2015.


As at 31 December 2014, MTS operated LTE networks in 76 of Russia’s 85 regions.

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