@The Convergence ...
Follow
Find
37.4K views | +33 today
 
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
onto @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

New TeleGeography map shows how the Internet will travel underwater in 2013 | Ars Technica

New TeleGeography map shows how the Internet will travel underwater in 2013 | Ars Technica | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

TeleGeography released a 2013 version of its Submarine Cable Map on Thursday showing the 232 cables that ferry telecommunications under water between countries. The mapmakers note that the number of cables do not denote capacity, but present an interesting visual of otherwise unseen connections around the world.

 

In addition to mapping the locations of the cables, the map shows a chart detailing the names and connectivity of all the cables installed between 1997 and 2012. For instance, the Challenger-Bermuda 1, built by Alcatel-Lucent in 2008, connects the US to Bermuda and had an initial capacity of 20 Gigabits per second, scalable to 320 Gigabits per second. The Unity/EAC-Pacific cable, lit in 2010 and funded in part by Google, connects the US and Japan (and cost around $300 million to build, according to Wired).

 

Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
@The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Our Global Future in the 21st Century is based on "The Third Industrial Revolution" which finally connects our new ICT infrastructure with distributed energy sources that are both renewable and sustainable
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Inside the weird, wonderful and award-winning Melbourne School of Design | Nick Lavars | GizMag.com

Inside the weird, wonderful and award-winning Melbourne School of Design | Nick Lavars | GizMag.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

There was more than a touch of irony about the University of Melbourne's old architecture building. As the breeding ground for generations of Australia's designers and builders, the plain brick building had come to be known as one of the campuses most drab and uninspiring structures. But a simmering discontent boiled over in 2009, when the university announced plans to knock it down and start again. Now standing in its place is a multi award-winning building that's as visually arresting as it is environmentally-friendly. The Melbourne School of Design places a premium on sustainability and collaborative education, and through an inventive architectural approach it has married the two to produce a truly unique learning environment.

"We wanted to grow and we needed a new facility and new labs," Alan Pert, Director of the Melbourne School of Design, tells Gizmag. "When looking for somewhere to study, architecture students these days are looking for infrastructure as much as anything. We knew that the best schools have the best technology and so eventually we got the university behind it."

The university held an international design competition in 2009 and attracted entrants from all over the globe. But it would be Melbourne-based John Wardle Architects and Boston firm NADAAA who would win out, forming a cross-continental collaboration to design the university's newest learning hub.

The key demands outlined in the brief were that the building was to act as an ongoing research project for the future of academic environments and the future of design studio learning, it was to emphasize sustainability and perhaps most audaciously, to bring contemporary lessons in architecture to life.


Click headline to read more and view pix gallery--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New class of "non-Joulian magnets" have potential to revolutionize electronics | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com

New class of "non-Joulian magnets" have potential to revolutionize electronics | Colin Jeffrey | GizMag.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Magnets are at the heart of much of our technology, and their properties are exploited in a myriad ways across a vast range of devices, from simple relays to enormously complex particle accelerators. A new class of magnets discovered by scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD) and Temple University may lead to other types of magnets that expand in different ways, with multiple, cellular magnetic fields, and possibly give rise to a host of new devices. The team also believes that these new magnets could replace expensive, rare-earth magnets with ones made of abundant metal alloys.

About 175 years ago, physicist James Prescott Joule (the same person after which the unit of work energy, the joule, is named) discovered magnetostriction, where iron-based magnetic materials minutely distort in shape, but not in volume, when placed in a magnetic field. Since then, it has been pretty much accepted that this was the way all magnetic materials behaved.

The work conducted on iron alloys (including iron-gallium, iron-germanium, and iron-aluminum) by researchers at UMD and Temple, however, has resulted in the observation of a property never before encountered in magnetic materials: a change in volume whilst in the process of magnetization. As this was fundamentally different to the phenomenon discovered by Joule, the new magnets are called "non-Joulian magnets."


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Parched: A New Dust Bowl Forms in the US Heartland | Laura Parker | National Geographic Food

Parched: A New Dust Bowl Forms in the US Heartland | Laura Parker | National Geographic Food | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

In Boise City, Oklahoma, over the catfish special at the Rockin' A Café, the old-timers in this tiny prairie town grouse about billowing dust clouds so thick they forced traffic off the highways and laid down a suffocating layer of topsoil over fields once green with young wheat.

They talk not of the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, but of the duster that rolled through here on April 27, clocked at 62.3 miles per hour.

It was the tenth time this year that Boise City, at the western end of the Oklahoma panhandle, has endured a dust storm with gusts more than 50 miles per hour, part of a breezier weather trend in a region already known for high winds.

"When people ask me if we'll have a Dust Bowl again, I tell them we're having one now," says Millard Fowler, age 101, who lunches most days at the Rockin' A with his 72-year-old son, Gary. Back in 1935, Fowler was a newly married farmer when a blizzard of dirt, known as Black Sunday, swept the High Plains and turned day to night. Some 300,000 tons of dirt blew east on April 14, falling on Chicago, New York, Washington, D.C., and, according to writer Timothy Egan in his book The Worst Hard Time, onto ships at sea in the Atlantic.

"It is just as dry now as it was then, maybe even drier," Fowler says. "There are going to be a lot of people out here going broke."

The climatologists who monitor the prairie states say he is right. Four years into a mean, hot drought that shows no sign of relenting, a new Dust Bowl is indeed engulfing the same region that was the geographic heart of the original. The undulating frontier where Kansas, Colorado, and the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma converge is as dry as toast. The National Weather Service, measuring rain over 42 months, reports that parts of all five states have had less rain than what fell during a similar period in the 1930s.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Germany: M-net fibre subscribers reach 100,000 | TeleGeography.com

German regional telecoms operator M-net has revealed that it has signed up its 100,000th fibre customer.


The company, which primarily operates in the federal states of Bavaria and Hesse, is aiming to increase the number of households covered by its fibre-optic network to 600,000 by the end of the year.


Stadtwerke Munchen holds a 60% stake in M-net, while other shareholders include energy companies Stadtwerke Augsburg Energie, Allgau Uberlandwerk, N-ERGY, infra furth and Erlanger Stadtwerke.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Netherlands: KPN expands LTE-A coverage to seven cities | TeleGeography.com

Dutch telecoms giant KPN has expanded its LTE-Advanced (LTE-A) network to cover seven major cities, according to reports from technology website Tweakers, citing a statement from the operator.


Users in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht, The Hague, Groningen, Eindhoven and Tilburg can now access theoretical speeds up to 225Mbps, via compatible devices. The faster speeds are a result of KPN’s use of carrier aggregation (CA) technology, which combines frequencies in the 800MHz and 1800MHz bands.

As previously reported by TeleGeography’s CommsUpdate, in March this year KPN announced that it had trialled the Netherlands’ first tri-band CA solution, utilising frequencies in the 800MHz, 1800MHz and 2600MHz bands and allowing the telco to achieve peak download speeds of 297Mbps. Going forward, KPN plans to roll out tri-band CA in areas where high levels of data traffic has a negative effect on its download speeds.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Oil rig fire causes 'rainbow sheen' in the Gulf of Mexico | Brian Ries | Mashable.com

Oil rig fire causes 'rainbow sheen' in the Gulf of Mexico | Brian Ries | Mashable.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

An oil rig fire in the Gulf of Mexico early Friday morning has caused "rainbow sheen" more than a mile long, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The Coast Guard said it received a report at 2:50 a.m. from an offshore supply vessel that reported a fire on board an oil production platform.


The ship evacuated the crew of 28 workers on board who were taken ashore. No one was hurt in the incident.


The oil well was "shut in and production has ceased," the Coast Guard said, which noted that the platform had an estimated 4,000 barrels of crude oil on board in storage tanks.


But David Margulies, a spokesman for Texas Petroleum Investment Co, which owns the rig, told The Times-Picayune there were actually only 100 barrels — about 5,040 gallons — on board the platform.


"The production platform where the fire occurred gathers oil and then pumps it through a pipeline so there is little oil stored on site and all wells feeding the platform have been shut down," he said.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New Browser Extension Decides How Trustworthy You Are | Jason Tanz | WIRED

New Browser Extension Decides How Trustworthy You Are | Jason Tanz | WIRED | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Three years ago, in a TEDGlobal talk, sharing-economy guru Rachel Botsman shared her vision of a “reputation dashboard”—a kind of credit report that tracks your online behavior across services like Airbnb, TaskRabbit, and Dogvacay and compiles it into a portable measurement of your trustworthiness. Amassing that data, Botsman proposed, would make reputation into a kind of currency. “In the 21st century,” she predicted, “new trust networks, and the reputation capital they generate, will reinvent the way we think about wealth, markets, power and personal identity, in ways we can’t yet even imagine.”

It’s a compelling vision, but so far it hasn’t been realized. That’s because, as I noted last year, the companies that have amassed the most reputation data aren’t eager to share it. “We’re in an early and competitive stage,” Monroe Labouisse, Airbnb’s director of customer service, told me at the time. “That asset—the trust, the data, the reputations that people are building—is hugely valuable. So I’m not sure why a company would give that up.”

A new company is trying to do an end-run around that intransigence by scraping publicly available information from various sharing-economy services and compiling it into a trust score between 0 and 100. Called Karma, it works as a browser extension—any time you pull up a supported site (which currently includes Airbnb, Craigslist, Dogvacay, Ebay, Etsy, RelayRides, and Vayable) a pop-up window will ask if you want to link your account to your Karma score. That score is calculated by looking at the reviews you’ve received—both the quantitative ratings (the number of stars, for instance) as well as a textual analysis of written comments.


Different services are weighted differently; intimate interactions like those powered by Airbnb and Dogvacay are deemed more relevant than relatively anonymous eBay sales, and more recent reviews also are weighted more heavily. The more services you link, the higher your potential score. (Of course, if you’ve misbehaved on one service, your score could fall—but then, you would probably choose not to link it in the first place.) When you peruse a supported service, you’ll see every user’s Karma score superimposed over their listings. It’s a little bit like the sharing-economy’s answer to Klout, that notorious Q rating for social media.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

EU dropped pesticide laws due to US pressure over TTIP, documents reveal | Arthur Neslen | The Guardian

EU dropped pesticide laws due to US pressure over TTIP, documents reveal | Arthur Neslen | The Guardian | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

EU moves to regulate hormone-damaging chemicals linked to cancer and male infertility were shelved following pressure from US trade officials over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) free trade deal, newly released documents show.

Draft EU criteria could have banned 31 pesticides containing endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). But these were dumped amid fears of a trade backlash stoked by an aggressive US lobby push, access to information documents obtained by Pesticides Action Network (PAN) Europe show.

On the morning of 2 July 2013, a high-level delegation from the US Mission to Europe and the American Chambers of Commerce (AmCham) visited EU trade officials to insist that the bloc drop its planned criteria for identifying EDCs in favour of a new impact study. By the end of the day, the EU had done so.

Minutes of the meeting show commission officials pleading that “although they want the TTIP to be successful, they would not like to be seen as lowering the EU standards”.

The TTIP is a trade deal being agreed by the EU and US to remove barriers to commerce and promote free trade.

Responding to the EU officials, AmCham representatives “complained about the uselessness of creating categories and thus, lists” of prohibited substances, the minutes show.

The US trade representatives insisted that a risk-based approach be taken to regulation, and “emphasised the need for an impact assessment” instead.

Later that day, the secretary-general of the commission, Catherine Day, sent a letter to the environment department’s director Karl Falkenberg, telling him to stand down the draft criteria.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
Jan Vajda's curator insight, Today, 2:13 PM

Přidejte svůj pohled ...

Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

MA: Phragmites in Ponds, Friend or Foe? | Alex Elvin | Vineyard Gazatte

MA: Phragmites in Ponds, Friend or Foe? | Alex Elvin | Vineyard Gazatte | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

With Island ponds suffering from the effects of development, the Martha’s Vineyard Shellfish Group is looking at an old foe in a new light. Over the past two years, the shellfish group has been studying the invasive wetland grass phragmites as a possible means for removing nitrogen from coastal pond ecosystems.

Phragmites first arrived on the Vineyard with the early settlers, who used the tall, sturdy reed to thatch their roofs. The plant is now widespread throughout the country, growing in monocultures and often taking a toll on plant biodiversity. Managing it is a challenge, since it reproduces through both seeds and rhizomes. Controversial herbicides are still considered the only effective means of eradication.

At the same time, Island ponds are experiencing varying levels of impairment as a result of nutrient overload, mostly in the form of nitrogen from septic tanks. Towns are exploring a wide array of solutions to the nitrogen problem, including expanded sewer systems. But alternative solutions, including oysters, which absorb nitrogen from the water, and denitrifying septic systems, are also part of the mix.

In 2013 the shellfish group received a grant from the Edey Foundation to begin studying the potential benefits of phragmites. Special projects coordinator Emma Green-Beach has been collecting samples from around the Lagoon Pond on the Vineyard Haven side, and has determined that an acre of phragmites contains about 200 kilograms of nitrogen, or the equivalent of half a million cultured oysters.

“We could remove more nitrogen with phragmites than we can with an oyster farm,” Ms. Green-Beach said this week at the shellfish group’s hatchery, situated on a bank overlooking the Lagoon on the Vineyard Haven side. Every year, the shellfish group raises tens of millions of oysters, clams and scallops, which are distributed among the Island towns. Most of the phragmites sampling so far has been done around the Lagoon, but Ms. Green-Beach plans to expand to Chilmark Pond, where phragmites is also abundant and shellfish can’t be eaten due to high bacterial counts. Last year, most of the sampling was done in the summer, when the plant flowers. But Ms. Green-Beach hopes to start sampling much earlier this year, to see how much nitrogen the younger plants take up.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

UK ISP Hyperoptic Touts Hyperfast 1Gbps Fibre-to-the-Boat Broadband | Mark Jackson | ISPreview UK

UK ISP Hyperoptic Touts Hyperfast 1Gbps Fibre-to-the-Boat Broadband | Mark Jackson | ISPreview UK | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Pure fibre optic ISP Hyperoptic has announced that their 1000Mbps capable Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP/B) network has just reached residential boats in London’s South Dock marina (including South Dock and Greenland Dock), which we guess makes it a “Fibre-to-the-Boat” service. Ho ho.

Apparently there are 150 berths in the South Dock, with 50 berths in the Greenland Dock, and so far over 50% of residents have already ordered the service. Well you can hardly blame them because prior to today they had to rely on basic 3G based Mobile Broadband connections.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Verizon FiOS launches global triple-play bundle | Sean Buckley | Fierce Telecom

Verizon FiOS launches global triple-play bundle | Sean Buckley | Fierce Telecom | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Verizon has launched a new global FiOS triple-play bundle as a way to appeal to customers that want custom international programming.

With the ability to customize their international TV programming, customers can choose from seven different languages: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Mandarin, Cantonese, Hindi or Punjabi Programming.

In addition to the programming, customers can get 300 minutes of international calling per month from their home to landline and wireless phones in more than 100 countries worldwide at no additional cost.

For customers that are willing to sign up for a two-year agreement for a new FiOS triple-play bundle that includes Internet, TV (including Custom TV, Extreme HD and other bundles) and telephony, the offer includes either a $300 Visa gift card, 24 months of the Spanish Language TV Package, or both the World Plan 300 international calling plan for 12 months and one of the TV programing packages free of charge for 12 or six months depending on the package selected.


Click headline to read more and access hot link--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NASA's SMAP mission begins science operations | Chris Wood | GizMag.com

NASA's SMAP mission begins science operations | Chris Wood | GizMag.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Less than four months after lift-off, testing on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory is complete, and science operations have begun. The data recorded by the mission, which will give rise to more accurate weather forecasting, will now be subject to a year of validation against existing measurements.

The goal of the SMAP mission is to provide up-to-date global soil moisture maps, measuring a 620-mile-wide (1,000-km) swathe of the ground below as it flies at an altitude of 426 miles (685 km) from pole to pole. It's designed to detect whether soil is frozen or thawed, and will help researchers to better understand the planet's water, carbon and energy cycles. In the long run, it should lead to improved weather predictions and monitoring of hazards such as flooding.

The mission launched on January 31, and the satellite's 20-ft (6-m) antenna was unfurled back in February. The team then worked to spin-up the antenna to its full 14.6 revolutions per minute, before powering on the radio and radiometer instruments at the end of March, and testing their performance and accuracy.


Click headline to read more and view map--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Slovenia: Tusmobil begins LTE rollout | TeleGeography.com

Slovenian cable TV and broadband operator Telemach has announced that the mobile network of its newly acquired mobile unit Tusmobil will be expanded and upgraded with Long Term Evolution (LTE) technology this year.


The firm plans to deploy 4G equipment to cover 75% of the population by end-December, with equipment partner Huawei having already begun work on the upgrade in the country’s coastal region.


Meanwhile, Tusmobil’s 3G network is to be expanded to offer 99% population coverage under a EUR50 million (USD55 million) rollout project. Telemach paid EUR110 million to acquire Tusmobil, Slovenia’s third-placed wireless operator, in a deal which completed last month.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Cutting warming to 1.5°C could put food supply at risk | Alex Kirby | Climate News Network

Cutting warming to 1.5°C could put food supply at risk | Alex Kirby | Climate News Network | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

As world leaders try to agree how to prevent global warming from heating the planet by more than 2°C above pre-industrial levels, scientists have tackled an altogether thornier question: can we keep the rise below 1.5°C?

The lower target − demanded by more than 100 countries as a safer goal − is attainable, they say. But there will be little room for error, and getting there will mean not only cutting greenhouse gas emissions, but actually removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

That is not possible with the technology now available. And even if it could one day be done, it would probably have forbiddingly harmful consequences for world food supplies.

However, limiting temperature rise by 2100 to less than 1.5°C is still feasible, say the researchers from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria, the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Germany, and colleagues. They report their findings in the journal Nature Climate Change.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

At trade talks, U.S., E.U. ready for fight on genetically modified crops | Michael Birnbaum | WashPost.com

At trade talks, U.S., E.U. ready for fight on genetically modified crops | Michael Birnbaum | WashPost.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Many Europeans see American farming and its reliance on genetically modified crops as more Frankenstein than Farmer in the Dell.

Now, the opposition here to U.S. agricultural practices is threatening to become a major battle in discussions starting next month that could sweep away trade barriers between the United States and Europe.

Many here worry that a trade pact would ease regulations that have made it difficult for genetically modified crops and products to reach European shores. Genetically modified crops are broadly unpopular in Europe, and farmers and environmentalists fear that if trade restrictions are lowered, both genetically modified seeds and U.S.-grown genetically modified products would quickly take over European farmland and grocery stores.

Some farmers are hoping to stop the talks if rules that govern their work are thrown into the mix, and they are determined to keep U.S. industrial farming an ocean’s-length away.

U.S. crops inspire fear among everyone from French wine producers to German corn growers. Many European farmers say that plants that are carefully engineered to do everything from boosting production to repelling pests have uncertain environmental consequences and, once growing, spread uncontrollably via pollen that can float for miles on the wind.

But in the United States, many farmers wring extra profit out of each acre they plant with the new seeds, and the technology has quickly cornered the U.S. market despite lingering concerns from environmentalists and consumers. In the United States last year, genetically modified crops comprised 88 percent of all corn, 94 percent of cotton and 93 percent of soybeans, according to Agriculture Department figures. In the European Union, they covered less than 1 percent of farmland, mostly in Spain, according to the European Commission.

“We will fight this until we cannot fight any more” if it appears that restrictions on growing genetically modified crops are about to be loosened, said Reinhard Jung, the head of the Brandenburg Farmers’ Federation. Jung’s 25 spotted brown cows grazed calmly one recent afternoon on a field behind his squat, red-brick farmhouse. “We don’t want to make the same mistakes with our agriculture that the Americans made with theirs,” he said, adding that American farms have become industrial in scale, unlike the postage-stamp plots in Germany.

With talks expected to begin within weeks, Europeans and Americans are still finalizing the topics where they will try to find an agreement, but officials on both sides say that genetically modified crops are almost certain to be part of a broader discussion about easing restrictions on the flow of agricultural products in both directions.

Few involved in the discussions expect European concerns over genetically modified products to endanger the entire trade pact, but analysts say the brouhaha could limit the extent to which agriculture is part of the final agreement.

Just two genetically modified crop types are approved for planting in the European Union, out of a far wider range of species used elsewhere. But one of the two, a BASF potato, is no longer marketed; the other, a Monsanto corn breed, is banned for growing in France, Germany and elsewhere, despite findings from both U.S. and E.U. food regulators that the produce is safe.

The foot-dragging on further approvals has long infuriated U.S. officials and businesses who say that Europeans are ignoring science in favor of superstition.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Indonesia: Telkom to launch Indihome 4K TV service | TeleGeography.com

PT Telkom Indonesia (Telkom) is beefing up its Indihome Fiber-branded, triple-play broadband service with the imminent launch of a very high resolution 4K television (4K TV) service for residential customers.


Earlier this week, Telkom’s director of consumer services, Dian Rachmawan, confirmed the plan saying: ‘Customers of Indihome Fiber in Indonesia will soon be able to enjoy 4K TV service. This is a trend that is currently one of the most talked about in the technology world, and Telkom will bring it to customers’ homes’.

Telkom is working with set-top-box (STB) supplier and content provider to deliver high quality television services to Indihome Fiber 4K customers and intends to integrate the new services with its existing IPTV platform in Indonesia, as well as developing hybrid platforms to work with Android-based systems.


4K TV requires a minimum 50Mbps connection to deliver the service and Telkom says it is testing it on the live Indihome Fiber network, ahead of a full launch.


Currently Indihome Fiber service coverage has reached 160 cities across Indonesia, with service coverage being built upon in each of these cities as Telkom looks to sign up a total of three million subscribers by the end of 2015.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

UK: BT to expand G.Fast trials to Swansea | TeleGeography.com

British fixed line incumbent BT is to test G.Fast technology in the Welsh city of Swansea, according to Tech Week Europe. With the telco set to provide around 100 premises in Swansea with broadband connectivity capable of providing downlink speeds of up to 500Mbps, these trials will follow on from previously announced large scale pilots which are to be carried out in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire and Gosforth, Newcastle later this summer.


It is understood that in the trials BT is specifically seeking to examine how G.Fast can serve multi-dwelling units such as apartment blocks and business premises, while also looking at the economic impact of such services on small and medium businesses.


In addition, the report notes that BT is also planning to establish a new test lab at the BT Tower in Swansea, providing academics, start-ups and other communications providers a place to trial G.Fast-based applications and technology.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Small Texas Town Don't Need No Stinkin' CenturyLink | community broadband networks

Small Texas Town Don't Need No Stinkin' CenturyLink | community broadband networks | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

The people in Kemp,TX, population 1,100, have officially said "adios" to CenturyLink and now give their business to a local wireless provider, reports Government Technology. According to the article, the community grew tired of slipshod service and repeated service interruptions:

At one point, the city lost its Internet connection for five days. “That was the last straw because that was detrimental to us, because we depend on the Internet so much more, especially with our phone system," said [City Administrator Regina] Kiser. "We had just gone with the voice over IP [Internet protocol] when our system went down for five days, so you try to call city hall about various things, including the police department, and there was no phone. So, that was horrible.”

After a year of requests from the municipality for better service went unheeded, government officials decided it was time to make some changes:


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Can Mozilla Halt Firefox’s Slide and Break Up the Mobile Internet Duopoly? | George Anders | MIT Technology Review

Can Mozilla Halt Firefox’s Slide and Break Up the Mobile Internet Duopoly? | George Anders | MIT Technology Review | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

In Silicon Valley, most pioneers pursue big ideas and giant personal fortunes with equal zeal. Then there’s Mozilla, an innovation dynamo that refuses to get rich.

More than 500 million people worldwide use Mozilla products. The company’s Firefox Internet browser is the top choice in countries ranging from Germany to Indonesia. But the company has no venture capital backing, no stock options, no publicly traded shares. It hardly ever patents its breakthroughs. Instead, Mozilla has a business model that’s as open and sprawling as the World Wide Web itself, where everything is free and in the public domain.

For a long time, it seemed as if Mozilla’s idealistic engineers understood the future better than anyone. By building the Firefox browser with open-source software, Mozilla made it easy for all kinds of people to cook up improvements that the whole world could use. Independent developers in dozens of countries pitched in, creating add-ons that speeded up downloads, blocked unwanted ads, and performed other useful services. Firefox rapidly became the browser in which state-of-the-art development took place–on shoestring budgets.

Suddenly, though, the Internet looks nightmarish to Mozilla. Most of the world now gets online on mobile devices, and about 96 percent of smartphones run on either the Apple iOS or Google Android operating systems. Both of these are tightly controlled worlds. Buy an iPhone, and you’ll almost certainly end up using Apple’s Web browser, Apple’s maps, and Apple’s speech recognition software. You will select your applications from an Apple-curated app store. Buy an Android phone, and you will be steered into a parallel world run by Team Google. The public-spirited, ad hoc approaches that defined Mozilla’s success in the Internet browser wars have now been marginalized. Developers don’t stay up late working on open-source platforms anymore; instead, they sweat over the details needed to win a spot in Apple’s and Google’s digital stores. Rival operating systems offered by BlackBerry and Microsoft Windows have largely fallen by the wayside as well.


"Many of the principles we associate with the Web–openness, decentralization and the ability of anyone to publish without asking permission from others–are at risk,” declared a lengthy blog post written in November 2014 by Mitchell Baker, chair of the Mozilla Foundation, the nonprofit vehicle that serves as the company’s ultimate owner.


No matter that users and software developers seem to be thriving in this more structured new milieu, with nearly one billion Apple iOS and Google Android smartphones being sold each year. From Baker’s perspective, “frankly, this direction for the Internet sucks.”


Baker’s antidote: Firefox OS, a totally different operating system for smartphones, built on the same collegial, open-source principles that make the Firefox browser such a success. Mozilla has entered this battle with financial resources less than one-hundredth those of Apple and Google. And the organization is even shorter on time: the incumbents have enjoyed nearly a decade’s head start in some crucial markets. Is it too late for a radical attempt to crack the mobile duopoly?


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

NY: Riverkeeper sues over oil train rules | Khurram Saeed | LoHud.com

NY: Riverkeeper sues over oil train rules | Khurram Saeed | LoHud.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Riverkeeper is suing the federal government, claiming new rules for oil trains leave the public and environment vulnerable to accidents or spills.

Critics say the U.S. Department of Transportation regulations for moving crude oil by rail are too weak, offer too much time for private industry to implement mandated tougher tank car safety standards like thicker shells and better brakes, and contain too many loopholes.

“It’s time to stop taking little toddler steps and take the sort of action that will truly protect New Yorkers and that’s why we’re going to court,” Riverkeeper President Paul Gallay said.

There have been six fiery derailments of trains hauling Bakken crude oil in the last six months, Gallay said.

Gallay said up to 25 percent of all crude shipments from in the Bakken shale oil formation in North Dakota and Montana passes through the metro New York/New Jersey area. In Rockland, as many as 30 oil trains a week, each carrying 3 million gallons of Bakken crude, travel the CSX River Line.

Riverkeeper’s challenge, filed in the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York City on May 15, follows another lawsuit filed by a coalition of environmental and citizen groups, including the New York-based Waterkeeper Alliance, in federal court in San Francisco.

A DOT spokesman said the agency does not comment on pending litigation.

Gallay said the biggest flaws in the new rules, announced May 1, permit trains to go too fast outside of “high threat urban areas,” allow outdated DOT-111 tank cars to remain in service for up to 10 years and keep localities in the dark about when explosive crude oil passes through their communities.

Ironically, the oil industry is also suing the USDOT, taking issue with the timetables for retrofitting rail cars and installing new brake systems.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Our Pipeline Safety System Is Broken | Anthony Swift for Natural Resources Defense Council | Medium.com

Our Pipeline Safety System Is Broken - Natural Resources Defense Council - Medium

Big Oil comes with big risks — and as oil and gas companies make major plans to extract and ship more of their polluting product around the country, those risks are only growing. The latest example of the destructive mix of industry danger and lax government oversight can be found this week on the soiled shores of Santa Barbara: A pipeline rupture has spilled as much as 105,000 gallons of oil, according to the latest estimates, and polluted more than 4 miles of coastline and marine waters.

The pipeline is owned by Plains All American, a name that should be familiar to Southern Californians. A year ago this month, the company spilled more than 10,000 gallons into the streets of Los Angeles. But Plains is hardly the only risky venture moving petroleum through highly populated and environmentally sensitive areas. Since 1995, more than 5,600 “significant” pipeline incidents have caused nearly 1,400 injuries, killed an average of 18 people each year, and cost almost $7 billion in damages in places from Kalamazoo, Michigan, to Mayflower, Arkansas.

What’s going on here? We’re fracking and mining more dirty fuel in remote places like North Dakota’s deep Bakken formation and the Canadian tar sands pits of northern Alberta. That oil and gas needs to go to refineries and be put on ships to be sold around the world, and that means transporting it long distances, often in close proximity to national treasures like the California coastline and major population centers like Los Angeles. Big Oil is putting more and more explosive and corrosive fuel in North America’s pipelines, on ships and barges, and in aging train cars.


Click headline to read more, access hot links and watch video clip--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Scottish fibre infrastructure still worries local businesses, poll finds | John Dunn | ComputerWorldUK

Scottish fibre infrastructure still worries local businesses, poll finds | John Dunn | ComputerWorldUK | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Scottish IT decision makers remain sceptical about the effectiveness of the country’s broadband infrastructure, according to a YouGov poll commissioned for fibre infrastructure provider CityFibre.

Forty percent of the 100 'decision makers' surveyed said that they had “regular concerns” about Internet infrastructure having some impact on their company while 42 percent believed it would affect their ability to grow.

Seven out of ten said it would affect customer service while nearly half thought that the state of Internet infrastructure would affect their decisions on technology business investment, for example in cloud services.

Six out of ten (61 percent) rated fast broadband as important for economic and business growth, ahead of factors such as reduced taxes (48 percent), and increased housing availability (23 percent). Surprisingly, it even beat improved national transport links (59 percent),

“Scotland is a vital part of the UK economy. Regions like Aberdeen, Edinburgh and others are powerhouses of important industries like oil and gas and financial services,” said CityFibre’s city development manager James McClafferty.

“Such areas are in desperate need of cutting edge technology in order to carry out their day-to-day business. More importantly they need the network infrastructure to support it.”

In March CityFibre and Scottish partner Commsworld announced plans to build a 150km fibre network in and around Edinburgh which the firm claims will rival urban networks anywhere in the world. Smaller fibre networks have already been built by the pair in Aberdeen, York, Peterborough, and Coventry.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Japan: NHK demos 8K to public | Chris Forrester | Advanced Television

Japanese public broadcaster NHK says that next week (May 28-31) during NHK’s Science & Technology Research Labs ‘open day’ in Tokyo that it will showcase its latest developments for 8K ‘Super Hi-Vision’ transmission.

NHK will transmit 8K material to the ‘Open Day’ using its BSAT-1 broadcast satellite on Channel 17. Highlights for the public will be the compression system used to reduce the huge 72 Gb/s image files to 85 Mb/s for broadcast.

NHK Labs says that it are using HEVC video encoding, and the MMT (MPEG Media Transport) standard for use in multiple transmission channels and MPEG-4 AAC for its 22.2 channel sound capability.

“By incorporating [these] technical elements for the realization of 8K broadcasting, this public demonstration will enable visitors to gain the advance experience of next year’s test 8K broadcasts,” said a NHK statement.

NHK will be showing an 8K recording (33-megapixels) in ultra-HDTV from NHK’s Symphony Orchestra of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6 (the Pathetique) conducted by Herbert Blomstedt, and captured last September.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

New record efficiency for black silicon solar cells | Dario Broghino | GizMag.com

New record efficiency for black silicon solar cells | Dario Broghino | GizMag.com | @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Aalto, Finland have broken the efficiency record for black silicon solar cells – a type of cell that can gather sunlight even from tight angles – by almost four percent.

Black silicon can be manufactured simply by adding a dense network of nanoscale needles on top of a standard piece of silicon. Modifying the material in this way makes it a lot less reflective, allowing solar cells that use it to trap light even when it's coming from very low angles. This could be a good way to increase the yield of solar cells throughout the day, particularly in countries at higher latitudes. On top of this, black silicon cells could also be cheaper, as they don't need the antireflection coatings used by many other types of solar cells.

The main issue that has stifled the progress of black silicon cells is something known as carrier recombination. When a photon hits a silicon atom inside a solar cell, the excess energy frees up an electron that is later used to generate electricity. Occasionally, though, the electron simply recombines with a silicon atom, effectively wasting the energy provided by the photon. Recombination is proportional to the surface area of the silicon, and the needles on the surface of dark silicon raise surface area so much that about half of the freed electrons are "lost" in this way.


Click headline to read more and access hot links--

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Scoop.it!

Singapore: Singtel to launch 10Gbps GPON pilot for residential customers | TeleGeography.com

Southeast Asia’s biggest telecoms company by subscribers, Singapore Telecommunications (Singtel), yesterday announced that it will soon begin rolling out next generation Gigabit Passive Optical Network (GPON) technology on its fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) network, offering fibre customers access to 10Gbps connections.


In the pilot phase, due to kick off in the third quarter, the telco says that the new service will be offered to a selected group of customers, ahead of a full-blown commercial launch in the latter part of the year.


Singtel says the GPON 10Gbps fibre broadband service will be useful for customers who run multiple 4K video sessions, noting that with the new network, a 50GB high-definition (HD) video can be downloaded within a minute using a 10Gbps line. The maximum bandwidth currently available to customers on a commercial basis is 1Gbps on Singtel’s Unlimited Fibre plan.


Click headline to read more--

more...
No comment yet.