The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights
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The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights
This page is all about the Jewish people and what had happened to them during World War II and the Holocaust.
Curated by Abigail Starus
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Jewish Badge

Jewish Badge | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
In the article Badge, Jewish from Learning About the Holocaust, it goes over the horrid badge the Jews were forced to wear during the Holocaust. During World War II, all of the Jewish people under German rule had to wear a white band with the blue star of David on it, to distinguish them from the “pure” race. This article covers the meaning behind the badge to the reactions from the Jewish people who were forced to wear it. It’s truly amazing how a simple badge could have such a horrible meaning and consequences behind it.
Abigail Starus's insight:

Whether it was a white band with a blue star, or the plain yellow star Lisa’s parents and countless other Jews had to wear, the effects were the same. It made people think less of themselves, some resulting in suicides. While we don’t truly know what happened to Lisa’s parents I can only hope that they did not die horribly like most of the Jewish race. In the story Lisa first finds out about the yellow star from her friend Gina, “Gina spoke about the letters from her parents and how they had been forced to wear yellow stars and carry identification cards with the large letter J. Lisa was aghast.” (82) Even though the letters weren’t from Lisa’s parents we can assume that they had to go through the same thing. It’s simply horrifying that they degraded the Jewish people to bad; it’s a miracle that Lisa was able to escape most of it.

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Mad Joy

Mad Joy | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
A small girl runs into a wood and two years later walks out of it and into the nearest house. Gracie, the childless spinster who finds her curled up on her armchair, takes her on as her own, seeing her as a feral gift of fate.
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Heres a book recommedation for the girls! This is a love story about a once "feral child" who falls in love with a World War II pilot! It looks really good.

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Arthur Rubinstein - Chopin - Polonaise No. 6 "Heroic"

Full movie available at:http://www.medici.tv/#!/artur-rubinstein-beethoven-piano-concerto-no4-chopinExcerpt from an archive footage recorded in 1967 at the Royal Festival Hall - London, Great Britain.Arthur Rubinstein, pianoFrédéric ChopinPolonaise...
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This is the peice that Lisa played in the end of her big concert at Wigmore Hall. Its very powerful and moving.

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About the Jewish Religion

About the Jewish Religion | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
This website gives all the juicy details about the Jewish religion and customs!
Abigail Starus's insight:

On the website Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs, there is an article all about the Jewish religion. It basically covers anything and everything about the customs and ways of the Jewish people. Two of the most important pieces of information are the paragraphs on Religious Life, and the paragraphs on Festivals and Days of Remembrance. In the section on Religious Life it goes through their prayer routines and the synagogue. While Festivals and Days of Remembrance go over the important holidays they celebrate and what they do on those days of celebration. And these are just two small sections in this lengthy article.

 

 

                Religion is a huge topic in this book. Lisa relies on prayer to get through some troubling times while she is in London. And even though there is no Synagogue- the Jewish place of prayer and study- in London, Lisa finds herself praying in her room, on a train, at work, and even at the piano bench. She never lets go of her belief. At the very beginning of this book Lisa’s mother states, “If we keep believing in God, He will protect us.” (20) They truly believed that no matter what God will protect them, all they had to do was believe in Him. While most of her prayer was for her family, Lisa did sometimes pray for strength for her fingers. So she would play the piano beautifully, “Then out of the gravity of this all to prayer came the energy and bustle of the con brio.” (208) She had prayed right before going on stage that she would perform wonderfully- she did. Prayer played a large part in this story, it showed how not only the piano was Lisa’s way of getting through this war.

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A German Plane Bombing London

A German Plane Bombing London | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
The Germans began bombing London in September 7th, 1940
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Even though Lisa was safe from Hitlers concentration camps, she wasnt safe from Hitlers air raids. Countless times the children where cramed into bomb shelters for hours at a time. Each time emerging from the shelter to see reckage.

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The Children of Willesden Lane Book!

The Children of Willesden Lane Book! | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
This story follows a young Jewish girl named Lisa. All Lisa
has ever known is her family and her beautiful music. She is a piano
prodigy, where people stop in the street awed by her music. But soon Hitler
and his army take over her precious Vienna, and her parents choose Lisa to
escape to London. Her mother gives her one piece of parting advice, hold on
to her music and makes something of herself. Lisa is thrown into a sea of
Jewish refugee children and sorted into a home to serve as a maid. She
yearns to play the piano again and runs away to try and make something of
herself, when she ends up in a hostel on Willesden Lane. There Lisa makes
many lifelong friends, and battles Hitler’s bombs with her powerful music;
there she can finally make something of herself.

Throughout this
book there are many different references to culture, history and human
rights violations/issues. Lisa often turns to prayer when she is scared or
worried about her family. Her mother told her, “We must keep faith.
The Jews are a people chosen by God. If we keep believing in God, He will
protect us.” (Golabek 20) The Sabbath and Shabbes is also Jewish culture
that shows up in the book. For history and human rights, the holocaust and
World War II in general are excellent examples in this story. During World
War II, the Jewish people were forced to wear a yellow star to distinguish
them from the “better” people. This labeled them as unworthy of
riding busses or even walking the streets at night.

Overall I
really enjoyed this book! A couple times I even got all misty eyed! Like
when she said goodbye to her family, or when she finally was reunited with
her sisters. This story is very touching and powerful. It was a quick read
and I would recommend it to anyone and everyone!

Abigail Starus's insight:

This book was great! I feel like everyone should read this story to learn more about what happend to the Jewish refugees that ended up in Europe and how the holocaust had even reached them!

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Holocaust

Holocaust | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
In this article from the
Encyclopedia or Race and Racism, it focuses on the history of the Holocaust
and how it came to be the genocide that it was. It begins with how the
Nazi’s first appeared in Jewish lives, to the aftermath of the horrible
genocide. In between the article shares how at first the Germans wanted to
just move the Jews away, to a different land. Then the Nazi’s decided that
it would be easier to kill all the Jewish people, to create a pure Germany.
This article is very powerful in showing how race and racism was used
against the Jews, and how horrible the Nazis were to their own
neighbors.
Abigail Starus's insight:

This article does an excellent job of showing the history of the holocaust from the beginning to the end. It gives you a clear visual to what really happened to Lisa’s mother and father, or what could have happened to them. Lisa was never reunited with her family, as was a lot of other Jewish children that escaped to London during the beginning of this genocide. Luckily she was reunited with her sisters, but never heard about her parents. “She went every day to see if new lists had been compiled, going over and over the old ones with care. Seeing that there were no Juras on the list, Lisa looked for Leo’s name. There were dozens of Schwartzes, but no Leos and no Rosies.” (247) this quote shows how Lisa- and the other Jewish children- flocked around the survivors list hoping to see their families name on them. This shows how the      Holocaust really impacted these children in more ways than one.

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No Time to Wave Goodbye

No Time to Wave Goodbye | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
"War Stories of British children who were forced out of their homes to the homes of "Borrowed Parents"." The War between Britian and Germany was on and thousands of families were voluntarily split apart...never to be the same.
Abigail Starus's insight:

If think I would probably read this book. Just the cover makes my eyes water!! This stroy is placed during World War II, but its about British children. So a little different, but I'm sure that they suffered in similar ways.

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We'll Meet Again - Vera Lynn

Dame Vera Lynn's 1940s song We'll meet again with WW2 photos Please feel free to rate and subscribe In Memory of the 70th Anniversary of World War 2
Abigail Starus's insight:

This book focuses a lot on music. Lisa fought off bombings with her piano music! (in her mind of corse) Here is a song about not saying "goodbye" but "see you later".

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Jewish Badge

Jewish Badge | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
The Jews were forced to wear a yellow star to indicate that they were Jewish.
Abigail Starus's insight:

Lisa's parents where left behind in Austria and no doubt had to wear these stars. Unfortunatly we never find out what became of her parents.

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Map of Austria

Map of Austria | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
This is Lisa's home country! She grew up in Vienna, Austria. From there she escaped to London, England.
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Life After the Holocaust: Aron and Lisa Derman

Life After the Holocaust: Aron and Lisa Derman | The Children of Willesden Lane: Jewish Human Rights | Scoop.it
Life after the Holocaust: Aron and Lisa Derman, is an article about these two young Jewish people who lived throughout the holocaust. They tell their story here, on this website, about all the troubles and brushes with death they had encountered during the World War II. It begins when they met in a ghetto of Slonim in Poland, where the Germans had forced all the Jews to live. And from there they had to escape because the Nazis had begun to kill every Jew that lived in Poland. After they had escaped the ghetto their story continues to how they ended up fighting in the war in order to get revenge.
Abigail Starus's insight:

Aron and Lisa Derman’s story of taking revenge on the Nazis reminds me of how Lisa- in a way- fought back with her music. After the bombing on the children’s house, they moved her piano down to a cement basement, so that she could continue playing her music throughout the bombings. Lisa spoke of how riveting it felt to play through the bombings, as if she was fighting Adolf Hitler himself. “The relentless explosions worked their way inside her head, and soon, without even realizing it, Lisa imagined herself single-handedly fighting a war against the Führer.” (142) (Führer meaning German Leader or guide) Lisa’s love and passion for music caused her to stay strong and in a way fight against the Germans. And not only in her imagination, she became a pianist and played for military men and gave them hope.

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