The Cellist of Sarajevo
62 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

Sarajevo Bosnia Herzegovina - Cosmopolitan Dynamo Of A City | GITravel

Sarajevo Bosnia Herzegovina - Cosmopolitan Dynamo Of A City | GITravel | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
Sarajevo Bosnia Herzegovina is a cosmopolitan dynamo of a city. It has renewed itself on the principle of 'what doesn't kill you makes you stronger'...
Lauren Duffy's insight:

This article proves how Sarajevo overcame all the destruction from the war. They rebuilt the city on the moto, "What doesn't kill you, makes you stronger". Now, the city actively uses all their churches, cathedrals, and mosques as a place of worship, rather than just tourist attraction. The streets are filled with families, markets, and vendors. Everyone is pleased with everyday life instead of living in constant fear, as they did during the war.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

The Disappeared

The Disappeared | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
This story of passionate love between a Canadian and her Cambodian lover evokes their tumultuous relationship in a world of colliding values.
more...
Lauren Duffy's comment, December 17, 2012 10:31 AM
The Disappeared is a story of two lovers; the male leaves the destructive city and Anne heads out in search of him. When they return, the city is destroyed and they work hard to re-build their lives together.
Lauren Duffy's comment, December 17, 2012 10:47 AM
I chose this book because the story of the two characters lives were very similar to how the citizens of Sarajevo were living. They all had the feeling of constant fear in common. The destruction of the cities was a powerful influence on how they lived their lives, and I would like to read about how they overcame it.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

Sarajevo War Tunnel. Bosnia and Herzegovina. Let's go!

Ruben Alonso makes an emotional trip to the Sarajevo Tunnel. Beginning in January 1993, the Sarajevo Tunnel was dug by Bosnian volunteers working in 8-hour s...
Lauren Duffy's insight:

The Sarajevo war tunnel was the only consistent supply of resources to the city. The Serbians expected the siege to only last a couple weeks; however, it lasted much longer. Their new tactic included cutting off all the supply of food, water, and electricity. In 1992, the citizens of Sarajevo built a tunnel underground from the occupied area to the free area. It took 4 months to build and was 800 meters long. The tunnel was built in a woman named Sida's house. She supplied the soldiers and citizens with the necessary equipment and resources in order to continue to resist the Serbians. The resistance and perseverance of Sarajevo allowed them to last years rather than weeks. The Serbians did not know how this was happening. Eventually, they came to the conclusion that there was a tunnel but they could not figure out where it was, and they never did. The Humanitarian Tunnel was shown in the video and it was a narrow, short passageway with a rail in the middle for carts full of supplies to pass through. The carts carried: food, medicine, weapons, electrical supplies, and clothing. Without this tunnel and the aid of Sida, the city of Sarajevo would have collapsed long before they actually did.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

Catholic Relief Services | Bosnia Herzegovina

Catholic Relief Services | Bosnia Herzegovina | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
CRS has been working in Bosnia and Herzegovina since 1993 and supports programs in disaster response, education, peace and civil society development.
Lauren Duffy's insight:

The Catholic Relief Services have been aiding Bosnia-Herzegovina since the war started in 1992.The city suffered displacement of more than half of the population of 4.4 million people by either death or disabilities. The town had extremely high unemployment and over 46,000 families broken apart. They provided water, medicine, food, and any other life essential necessities to the people trapped in a Sarajevo. After the war, the CRS provided schooling, education on human trafficking awareness, and housing and economic solutions for displaced families. They partnered with The Association for Parent School Cooperation in 2005 and have provided over 170 councils to citizens willing to take part in the education reform. In all, the Catholic Relief Services have assisted over 29,000 people.       

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

GIC | Article

Lauren Duffy's insight:

 The marketplaces were the only means of food and essentials for the citizens of Sarajevo; however, even this necessity came consequences. Inflation rates went through the roof and therefore, goods were affordable to most of the town. Even if you could afford the products, the trip to the marketplace was dangerous in itself. These places became common gets for the Serbians; they killed up to fifty people in one day at one location. Not only was food scarce, but the aid and supplies coming into the town was minimal also. In a good week, 300 aid lifts should land in the airport; however one week, only 75 aid lifts and 5 convoys got by Serb lines. The black market shows the struggles and risks of everyday life in Sarajevo. No body should be afraid to go buy food to support their families. In most cases, the women were the ones making these trips because their husbands were on the front lines. Because of the probable outcome of the mothers not making it home, children were left in the streets as orphans. No innocent person should be forced to live a life like this. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

Last Stop in the Balkans: Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Last Stop in the Balkans: Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
The last stop on my tour of ex-Yugoslavia/the Balkans was Bosnia and Herzegovina.  Unfortunately after almost 24 hours in this beautiful country I had to head back to Ankara for class. The differen...
Lauren Duffy's insight:

This site is a blog of a woman and her travels through Bosnia and Sarajevo. She explains the culture, geographical "must-sees", and pictures of Sarajevo. One of the major places to visit is the bridge at Mostar. This bridge was built in the 1500s by the Ottomans and is still there today. She illustrates many important aspects of the city in her blog, and gives readers very interesting information about the background of Sarajevo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

UN Court Convicts Bosnian Serb of Genocide

UN Court Convicts Bosnian Serb of Genocide | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
UN war crimes tribunal convicts Bosnian Serb officer of genocide in Srebrenica massacre
Lauren Duffy's insight:

The article explains the current status of the people involved in the war crimes. The men were convicted of genocide and have to serve a lifetime in prison. I believe that they deserve every consequence that they are getting because of the mass destruction that they caused for the people in Sarajevo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

The Cellist of Sarajevo

The Cellist of Sarajevo | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
Lauren Duffy's insight:

 The Cellist of Sarajevo is a story set in Sarajevo during a very cruel war. The book is told from three different point of views: Kenan, Arrow, and Dragan. Kenan is a father who is trying to provide water, an essential source for life, for his family. Arrow is a young woman, in her twenties, who works independently for the army as a sniper. Dragan is an older man who has lost his family and is merely trying to get to the bakery for some bread without getting killed crossing the street. Each character faces the same struggle- to make it one more day without getting shot by the men on the hills. The war has caused plenty of anxiety and fear in the civilians of Sarajevo. The book illustrates how the men on the hills are constantly watching and torturing the people in the village. The cellist, however, is fearless from the beginning. He plays his cello out in the open for everyone to hear and enjoy for 22 days- one day for each person murdered at the bakery. He sacrifices himself everyday to show that the men on the hills cannot force him to stop doing what he wants to do. With this simple action, he unites the city and calms people in a time of chaos. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

Sarajevo

Sarajevo | The Cellist of Sarajevo | Scoop.it
In this map it shows many aspects of the war that were present in the book. The tunnel leads from the occupied side to the free side of the city. Spiper alley was a main road that was a common target for the "men on the hills". The market 'massacres' were also a heavy target for shellings because it was the citizens life source. The area in red is what was occupied by the Serbians and the dashed line was the frontline that many men were forced to fight on.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Duffy
Scoop.it!

GIC | Article

Lauren Duffy's insight:

 The Bosnian war is described in this article as "being waged by a kaleidoscope of militias, armies and freelance groups". There is not one group against another; there are loyalties overlapping, countries fighting against themselves, and freelance soldiers scattered all over. The Serbian Republic has 50,000 soldiers and is the strongest, most organized group on the Serbian side. The Bosnian Serb police forces also switched loyalties to the Serbian Republic once the Serbian's strength became evident. Counteracting these forces are the Muslim Bosnian groups; the most dominant of these groups is the Bosnian Territorial Defense Force. All together, the Territorials have 120,000 soldiers and 70,000 police officers working together. Other groups from Croatia have also split to combine with either the Serbians or the Territorials. The war is a mixture of countries, ideals, and war ethics and is causing much more destruction than      usefulness. 

more...
No comment yet.