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2015 FLUID Diversity Mentoring Programme launched

The Construction Industry Council (CIC) is
the representative forum for the
professional bodies, research
organisations and specialist business
associations in the construction industry.
Burutapen's insight:

Last Tuesday evening I was asked to speak to a room full of people about my experience as both mentor and mentee for the Fluid Programme. The response I received from standing up and sharing my journey was humbling and it made me realise how much need there is still for us to share our knowledge and experience within the industry I belong to.

 

It is a well known fact that the construction industry is not the most diverse one and it will therefore not come as a surprise if I say that the lack of representation of all types of minorities is a significant issue that is stopping us from keeping up with the world at the same rate as other industries are.

 

Year after year statistics support the public's perception, and year after year, young people choose other industries where they see themselves better represented. Studies show more people about to retire from than joining the industry and as a result, we (the society at large) are going to be facing serious difficulties. 

 

The truth is that, although there are still many areas for improvement, a lot has changed since I first joined it in 2000. Technology is in our side and all we need to do is make the most of it. 

 

We need to look at other industries and learn how they have dealt with this.

 

We need to make ourselves available for young people to see themselves represented and to have someone to ask their questions to.

 

We need to be honest and share the full length of the journey, not only our achievements, for that hard work is part of life.

 

And most importantly, we need to remember that we were "them", once upon a time and we would have liked to have "us" as companions of that journey.

 

From here, I'd like to say that if you can, you should consider mentoring.

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Actualidad - ¿Nos falta ambición a las mujeres?

Actualidad - ¿Nos falta ambición a las mujeres? | on business | Scoop.it
¿Somos menos ambiciosas las mujeres que los hombres? ¿Es un problema de ambición o tiene que ver con otro tipo de factores? -
Burutapen's insight:

 

Como  menciona el articulo, la definion de la palabra es la raiz del problema. En nuestra cultura, la ambicion no han sido un rasgo personal tradicionalmente positivo.

 

En ingles, la ambicion es el deseo de alcanzar algun tipo de logro o distincion. Es sinonimo de aspiracion, otra palabra complicada en el vocabulario castellano.

 

Bajo mi punto de vista, querer ser la mejor version de uno mismo  es logico, y sin embargo, perdemos demasiado tiempo proyectando nuestras propias inseguridades en los demas y compitiendo sin apreciar las cualidades que nos diferencian del resto.

 

En relacion a como afecta esto a ambos generos, estudios han demostrado que las mujeres tienden a ser demasiado exigentes consigo mismas.

 

Frente a una oportunidad de advance profesional, a la que la mayoria de los hombres se presentarian (aun faltandoles determinada experiencia), las mujeres somos nuestras peores criticas y ponemos un enfasis desproporcionado en los criterios que no cumplimos.

 

Es por ello que no creo que sea cuestion de falta de ambicion sino un caso de expectaciones desproporcionadas y vocablos desafinados.

 

Finalmente , en relacion a la pregunta: por que los hombres no renuncian a su Carrera?…  La verdad es que mientras los padres no tengan los mismos derechos que las madres, las mujeres seguiran sintiendo que tienen que elegir. 

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piles of bicycles

piles of bicycles | on business | Scoop.it

The Danish capital is one of the best places in the world to be a cyclist but there is a downside - thousands of parked bicycles.

Burutapen's insight:

I always find fascinating how the press can create news out of nothing or focused on negatives in order to dissuade public opinion from something with implications that are seeing as costly. 

 

Cycling is good : It gets us moving by building exercise in our day without the need for a gym, makes us embrace the cities we live in by truly experiencing them from the ground and make irresponsible drivers think twice when considering to take the centre of town as though they were in the M25. (Worth noting that this is also beneficial to pedestrians and other drivers) 

 

Then of course there are even more obvious benefits: it does not pollute , it is a rather affordable / democratic method to achieve mobility and it is quicker than dealing with traffic in the main roads. When it comes to bike parking though, we have a problem. 

 

The problem being that , in most cities, mass cycling is a relatively new phenomenon and there are no strategies in place to address it. 

 

But is this a problem, or an opportunity? I do think that the current misalignment between offer and demand is caused by a simple misunderstanding of the perceived lack of economical benefit that facilitating spaces brings to the provider ... That and the perceived (small) pool of customers (cyclists) which one would be catering for. 

 

As an architect , looking at how people live and thinking of improvements is what I do. As a cyclist in London, the practicalities of not finding a place to park my bike are not the best part of my days and therefore other countries' approaches always interest me. 

 

So far, the best solution that I have seen is in Tokyo where many people cycle. 

 

Tokyo is made out of a super dense centre where people (mostly men) go to work every day, and a network of stations in the satellite towns where they live. Those towns are extensive and it could take you quite a while to go from the station to your home after a long day at work. Hence, many people cycle. 

 

Outside stations, the railway companies (JR or others) provide parking areas for their customers (the commuters are indeed their customers) to continue to choose them. In some towns ,where the station is large enough, the parking area could even be located at the station itself. 

 

Another type of cyclist are the moms and housewives who work at home taking care of their family , take kids to school and who shop fresh produce every day. Bikes provide them with independence and transport. Shopping centres , department stores and even mini markets generally offer an area for customers to park their bikes as way to encourage footfall. 

 

It is generally in the basement of the building and has a variety of forms... from a low key room like arrangement to a more sophisticated double stack. This is a practical solution that not only helps the stored but the high street through the ripple effect. 

 

As the impact of our sedentary lives becomes evident and our online shopping habits have driven us away from the high street, convenience could be the tool to both increase footfall and solve the bike parking problem.

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Sitting around the table

Sitting around the table | on business | Scoop.it
People do business with people, not with technology. Whether you are a person or a brand, to truly build long-lasting personal relationship with another person or a brand advocate you need way more than just a couple of tweets and a LinkedIn connection request, you need face-to-face time.
Burutapen's insight:

I have always found fascinating how very often as humans we go around in circles to the start of our journeys.

 

Anthropologically seems justified as , after all, we are the animal with the ability to make the same mistake twice (... or is it? I had a dog, and they too are pretty good at it too... ) but even so, it has always puzzled me how we tend to over engineer solutions to then return back to the simpler arrangement and make it appear to be great discovery.

 

The case described here is interesting though.

 

Despite the fact that I too agree that face to face time is important (the penny just dropped re. the name choice of FaceTime) , I'd even say key, many relationships would be lost if that was all we had, and we should acknowledge the positive contribution that technology has brought to us for that matter.

 

People travel or relocate (I have) , and face to face goes out of the window and the good old letter or phone call had many limitations which I am happy to share with you (below).

 

How would you be able to keep in touch with former colleagues you may want to collaborate with in the future, or clients who may have wanted to give you work? It is not realistic to think otherwise. You cannot physically meet everyone face to face as there are not enough hours in the day.

 

It is the same "you"; behind the lines of communication that technology offers, and now you can participate , help and contribute in ways that were never available to us in the past.

 

I guess what I am trying to say is that I don't see why the table can't be virtual if you are authentic and the lines of communication are real and honest.

 

Technology ,used correctly, can allow you to keep closer to people in order to make the time spent apart to feel less relevant, less like a full stop, more like a coma.

 .............................................................................................................................

Ok, so as promised... here are my thoughts on pre technology

 

1. Lack of spontaneity

I was an avid writer as a child. I used to go to summer camps ,scouts, chess tournaments, and english courses and come back with a hand full of friends who I would regularly write to for a few months, and who would (in 99% of the cases) stop writing at some point.

 

All those trips were, to me, a great opportunity to find like minded people who my day to day would not allow me to get to know. People I could share ideas and simple events with because we had an understanding.

 

The letter though felt to be a static way to communicate as you were writing about things that had happened without a chance to share the building up to those or even the aftermath... And then of course, by the time they reached the other person, they were no longer relevant.

 

2. Time

Only serious deeper topics could be discussed in letters and as such, writing them they required a lot of time and concentration. And both of those can be costly currencies when you are a child.

 

Then of course your letter could arrive or not, and the other person had to find time to write back to you , post the letter and there we go again, wait for your response.

 

Never was this more obvious than with my father who played postal chess, which is exactly what it sounds like. He had a book (and a massive brain, I may add) where he kept track of all the games he was playing at once. It would take years and cost a fortune to complete a single game with someone in South America for example.

 

3. Expense

And of course the costs of communication. International calls were prohibitive and the stamps? Holy Moly ! They were dear indeed.

 

You had to arrange in advance with the other person when you would need to phone them in order to catch up.

 

In a world without mobiles , Skype or FaceTime, you would need to accept that relationships would be lost with time, and why should you?

 

My house was like a call centre each christmas when everyone called to wish each other the best. (When i say everyone... everyone who managed to get through before the lines collapsed. And they always did)

 

4. The day to day realities

Finally, regarding meeting up for coffee (which I love)...

 

I would never hear from my friends, colleagues or family if this was all that is available to me. I live in a very large city, in a different country to many of them.

 

The time I have when i travel back has to be shared amongst all of them, which generally means that i see very few... would I want to never hear from the rest? Why should I?

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Why Words Matter As Much As Numbers In Business

Why Words Matter As Much As Numbers In Business | on business | Scoop.it
This article is by L. J. Rittenhouse, president and chief executive of Rittenhouse Rankings and author of Investing Between the Lines: How to Make Smarter Decisions by Decoding CEO Communications. Bezos: A CEO who gets it about words.
Burutapen's insight:

In reading this article at Forbes, I cannot but agree with the spirit of it as it does clearly reinforce something I have felt for a very long time. 

 

With the advances in technology, and specially assisted by the Power of Pointing, I often fear that (just as it has happened to photography) a comfortable layer of mediocrity, hidden behind a fair amount of "bells and whistles" (as Brits so eloquently describe it)  has found a way in to the heart of business and, somehow, communication.

 

There is a very concerning tendency to speak (and write) words of no meaning that nobody fully understands yet people repeat endlessly. Why, I wonder, not construct a sentence suited to what you want to say rather than repeat a pre-formed one? For instance.

 

In my experience, people should speak the language of their audience, stripped down to basics, to make sure that everyone understands. As a very clever person once said: “If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough” (Albert Einstein)

 

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Rajoy Punishes Exporters Sustaining Spain’s Economy: Euro Credit

Rajoy Punishes Exporters Sustaining Spain’s Economy: Euro Credit | on business | Scoop.it

Aliberico SL survived Spain’s economic crisis by expanding sales of aluminum panels in the U.S., Brazil and Morocco. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy’s plan to raise corporate taxes may undermine the company’s efforts.

Burutapen's insight:

One from the heart today! 

 

Every time I read news such as these my blood boils : Firstly because the current situation has been contributed not only by the Spaniards, but also a global speculation (despite no one talking about this) and secondly because those in charge never help or empower the average citizen. They only depend on and take from them. 

 

Spain is a country with many capable people who deserve an opportunity to take care of themselves, yet the government and the systems in place make it almost impossible for anyone to do so, whilst clearly those in Europe do not even realise. 

 

Ok, an example: In the UK, where I currently reside, you have a chance to get out and find some way to make a living. There are resources to assist you setting up a company, loans, start-up initiatives and street markets, where you can sell what you make including food! In Spain though, it is... complicated. 

 

You need to fit in a box and there are, I am told, a very limited amount of boxes to fit in! If you are living in 2013 (not just passing by) you will be aware that the world is more complex than a category based box ticking exercise, and I do believe that the systems should keep up with the times if there is any hope to survive! Here is my thinking... 

 

I will "put it out there" in the hope that someone grabs it, 

 

1. In Spain, most people know how to make a tortilla (Spanish omelettes) 

 

2. Many of those who can make tortilla are unemployed. 

 

3. The people who are working are trying to explore ways to stretch their euros but often don’t have time to make their own pack lunches. 

 

4. If the people, who can make tortilla, were able to sell the tortilla to those needing to buy an affordable lunch to take to work, they could be making money and take care of their families. 

 

Could they not? NOT in Spain. Because selling food in the street is illegal! So instead, those people who have a skill that could provide a useful service and help taking care of their own family cannot utilise it. 

 

The way I see it, call me subversive (a friend of mine already did), by not allowing those mothers/ fathers to make a living and feed their children, the system is taking away their basic human rights! 

 

So, here is my proposal: I call it the #tortillarevolution o #revoluciondelatortilla . What could the system do if people made tortillas and sold them in the street? Tortillas made with the same love and care that is used when prepared for the family. 

 

Spanish traditional tortillas! 

 

The one dish that unites the country. 

 

Could they stop everyone? 

 

Could they?

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Connect, Then Lead

Connect, Then Lead | on business | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
Burutapen's insight:

I cannot begin to tell you how many times I have attended a networking event where there was someone passing cards without any other interaction... worryingly, I have also wintnessed this in business through my career.

 

Personally, I chose not to conduct myself in this manner because I find it uncomfortable and because I am fully aware of the key role that any of the teams I have ever lead have played in the success of each one of the projects, and I know that connectig at a personal level is vital.

 

Over the years I have learnt a lot from some of the people I have worked with. Sometimes positively, sometimes not so, however, it is thanks to both that I am the person I am and it is because of this that I am grateful.

 

Here are the best tricks I have learnt to keep a strong team spirit:

 

1. Always take responsibility and lead by example, never asking from others more than you ask from yourself.

 

2. Nobody is prefect, not even you. Acknowledge it and take responsibility. 

 

3. Mistakes are allowed so long as you learn from them and correct them, as a team, as soon as possible. The team's mistakes are also yours. 

 

4. Discussion is encouraged, blaming culture is not. 

 

5. Alway find a link between you and the other person. Something that you have in common and you can escape to when the going gets tough.

 

6. Be open. The more a team knows about the project and where to access information from, the safer the project will be. 

 

7. Be available, even when you are busy. A minute discussion can safe hours of frustration. 

 

8. Understand that your role in the team is a role, not a position of power. 

 

10. Everybody can have a bad day. Respect each other's space.

 

11. Do not tell people how long something wil take, ask.

 

12. Provide a sense of ownership. People thrive when they are allowed to. 

 

13. There is not such a thing as a stupid question, only stupid answers.

 

If everything else fails... the biscuit tin and a coffee break are a good reminder that you are only human.

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6 Ways Companies Drive Out Their Best People

6 Ways Companies Drive Out Their Best People | on business | Scoop.it

In some companies, people stay only until they can figure out how to leave. The sad thing is - it doesn't have to be like that.

Burutapen's insight:

In almost fifteen years as an active employee I have not stopped being amused each time of of these manifest in front of my eyes.

 

Even as a student when I worked at various restaurants and shops the same topics were part of people's discussions. Why? Because despite the relative comfort of our lives, it is our natural instinct to want to better ourselves .

 

Anthropologically, it probably comes from the acknowledgement of the need to "keep up" / "win" in order to provide for us and or our families, though this is logical thinking rather than knowledge from an architect rather than anthropologist ...

 

To have your wings cut off is common practice in many offices as a way to control their workforce and prevent their departure; but in truth, all this does is retain a bunch of demotivated broken souls that begin to simply comply with the minimum standard rather than bring added value.

 

Personally, I have constantly made mental notes of things I'd do so differently . I even made a point to never let me forget that I was , at least, affected by them in order to break the cycle. Nobody is perfect but given that each day is a new opportunity to better yourself... Why would anyone let this go? Specially businesses looking to succeed.

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How Kindness Makes Or Breaks Careers

How Kindness Makes Or Breaks Careers | on business | Scoop.it
You don't break in you're let in as the career trajectory of Etsy design lead Cap Watkins illustrates. Now go return the favor.
Burutapen's insight:

I count myself lucky for having met a lot of generous people throughout my life. People who have shared their knowledge, experience and time with me just as I have, and continue o do, with others. 

 

In life you never know where opportunities are going to come from and every person you encounter has the potential to affect the course of your life. 

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Cumple tus compromisos

Cumple tus compromisos | on business | Scoop.it
En los negocios la fiabilidad será siempre tu mejor tarjeta de presentación.
Burutapen's insight:

Debo decir que , para mi, la maxima es "no prometas , si no estas al 100% seguro de que vas a poder cumplir". Como bien dice el articulo, si dependes de otros, es dificil estar seguro al 100% y la unica manera es crear procesos para optimizar el resultado. 


En mi experiencia, en el mundo de la construccion, suele ayudar tanto crear procesos y conexiones multiples como buscar maneras de resolver los problemas "outside the box" para evitar las penalizaciones economicas que se recibirian en caso de retraso. Al final, como en todo, es cuestion de conocer tus limitaciones y trabajar con ellas.


Otro punto que se debe mencionar es que tampoco podemos generalizar. Soy de Donostia/ San Sebastian pero vivo en Londres y aqui tambien los hay quienes van a meetings y prometen cosas que no pueden cumplir. 


Cuando llegue, me imagine que todo iria al minuto y pronto me di cuenta de que no. Como dicen aqui (menos finamente) a veces, pasan cosas. La diferencia es como reaccionas ante las dificultades.
Si bien es cierto que lo de "manana manana" es una imagen estereotipo de los espanoles (en espanya) desde la lejania de Europa, en el contexto de trabajo, jamas he oido ese comentario .
En mi experiencia, dar mi palabra (y cumplir) me ha ganado la confianza de clientes que han seguido queriendo trabajar conmigo y me han recomendado a otros.

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Why Leaders Don’t Brag About Successfully Managing Stress

Why Leaders Don’t Brag About Successfully Managing Stress | on business | Scoop.it
Only 20% share what works.
Burutapen's insight:

In reading this article I cannot avoid but thinking about the many times that I have had to talk to my teams, at times of high pressure,  to help them channel their stress in a positive and productive way. 

 

My personal approach is simple: compartmentalization.

 

Meditation has been a key tool achieving this as its clear objective is to train your mind to block thoughts.

 

This is "the" most useful skill i learnt when i was studying architecture . (I realize that this is quite an statement but I cannot think of any other I have used in more occasions than that)

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6 million gallons of clean water WASTED

6 million gallons of clean water WASTED | on business | Scoop.it
No one would deny amount of positive awareness the viral "Ice Bucket Challenge" has raised for ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease, but some are criticizing it for wasting water, especially in drought-stricken areas like California. Jason Ruiz for the Long Beach Post drafted a quick breakdown...
Burutapen's insight:

I have , for weeks , seen how people endlessly post videos of themselves to the world (the original alternative to donating money as I understand) rather than supporting a cause with their hard earned cash .... privately. After all, why does the rest of the world need you to tell them what to do? And more importantly, is this about the cause or has this become the latest egomaniac exercise?

 

I find the whole thing disturbing in many ways.

 

On the one hand, t feels that just as it happens to articles that are forwarded through Twitter  without people actually reading them, this business of sharing videos of people taking on  the bucket challenge has taken central stage and is becoming the centre of discussion rather than the understanding of the physical implications of the illness itself and how as individuals we can make a difference to someone affected by it.

 

On the other, many people are doing actual real work on a variety of charitable organisations and making a difference by contributing to people's lives on a positive way, yet, those talking to the camera with a bucket of ice have (somehow) become the once who deserve the attention.

 

Finally, the issue of wasting water.... 6 million gallons to date? And you read comments like those on this article talking about water being recycled... Like a friend of mine would say: what a developed world viewpoint this is!

 

It does recycle, yes, but it is a precious resource that is at the heart of human survival and yet it is slowly but surely becoming a commodity for a large part of the world.

 

So please: STOP this nonsense.

 

If you want to make a difference, go to your local charity and give your time. Not even your money. Look around, see what you don't need and give it to someone who does. And if you want to contribute to research, do find a cause close to your heart and commit! Set up a regular contribution , organise a collection through a good bake off... something constructive and less wasteful.

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Housing standards review consultation - Consultations - GOV.UK

Housing standards review consultation - Consultations - GOV.UK | on business | Scoop.it
This consultation seeks views on the results of the recent review of building regulations and housing standards.
Burutapen's insight:

It is hard to be an architect in the UK ... especially because it is often difficult to convey to the general public the added value that we bring to the table. 

 

Many people tend to imagine that architects are a sort of glorified DIY planner whose’s job could easily be done by anybody. Unfortunately, the fact that in this country, there is no need for the architectural body to sign buildings off, would appear to support that argument.

 

However, thanks to the #RIBA team behind #HomeWise, with their Without Space + Light campaign, we might still have a chance for the average citizen to get a better understanding of the contribution that good quality space planning (dare I say architecture) can bring to the their day to day life.

 

After months of campaign by the Royal Institute of British Architects’ concerned citizens, the Government published this week their "Housing Standards Review: Consultation” Papers which recognise the need for minimum space standards across the board and open the debate to the public. This consultation will close on the 22nd of October so do have a look. 


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They Finally Tested The 'Prisoner's Dilemma' On Actual Prisoners — And The Results Were Not What You Would Expect

They Finally Tested The 'Prisoner's Dilemma' On Actual Prisoners — And The Results Were Not What You Would Expect | on business | Scoop.it

" Prisoners were more cooperative than students." The article says about a strange application of game theory

Burutapen's insight:

 

I find these results hardly surprising... 

 

If you are in a situation with no way out, clearly your priorities are different. (Rule 1 for experimenting is to remember that the environment is likely to affect the results) Those incarcerated (as in the example) are going nowhere and it would therefore seem natural to build on popularity and likeability to strengthen their current position, even from the point of view of a criminal. Would it not? 

 

To me, what is surprising is to use cigarettes in order to test the "prisoners dilemma" within a prison, where the value is clearly different to the outside world. (Another golden rule, is that in order to compare you need equivalent comparables) One can only imagine that as the price increases in relevance, (i.e. value) freedom being the ultimate price, other factors may arise... In fact, time is also a factor to take into consideration. I.e One is likely to be more "selfish" if the price is high and the risk to be reminded of one's selfishness is low. (This is a cultural fact that we cannot shy away from) 

 

Finally, I do also think that the fact that the prison had female inmates may also have affected the outcome as studies show that female are more interested in achieving the "right outcome" than the one that benefit them most individually. Essentially, I wonder what the experiment sought out to proof...

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Why I won't speak at women-only events

Why I won't speak at women-only events | on business | Scoop.it
Belinda Parmar, chief executive of Lady Geek, explains why gender equality must be reframed as a problem for all of society
Burutapen's insight:
In reading this article two thoughts rushed to my mind. Firstly, that I am glad to know that "The daughter effect" is in fact a proven theory , and secondly that for women (the minority at the top of the workforce) to succeed in their attempt to deliver a plain field for the generations to come, men (the majority at the top of the workforce) need to be included in the debate. In regard to the first point, I have been convinced about it all my life. I'd say more and admit that I have, in fact, used the "if you had a daughter how would you feel" to illustrate innequality, sexism and discrimination in more times than one. Always remembering that old say "you will never understand another man until you walk a mile on their shoes". In regard to the second point, and coming from a male lead industry, I'd say that (as Warren Buffet clearly explained it on his Fortune Magazine interview) if we have gone this far drawing from 50% of the talent pool, imagine how far we could go if all 100% were given the opportunity to contribute. It is because of this that we cannot run the risk of creating yet another fragmented alternative world, and I honestly believe that female professional groups (at least those I have come across) understand this, as in fact, men are welcome! What it is worrying though, if you think about it is that, how ever many years go by, there is still a need for those groups to encourage new generations to think beyond the artificial barriers imposed upon minorities.
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The lamp of Thomas Edison

La Lampara De Tomas Edison : Dicen que si alguna vez en la historia existio un hombre que de verdad supo perdonar a alguien, ese fue Tomás Edison, el

Burutapen's insight:

I like this little story because now a days we don't seem to be aware of the simple fact that we cannot achieve our best work without a good team behind us.Modesty is something missing in the current business vocabulary and ,in fact , it is often confused by those in power as self doubt.

 

Companies let good people go , at every level , rather than giving the chance to stay, develop and grow the in-house skills.The idea of belonging and fidelity that my parents' generation experienced does not seem to exist in the west anymore . The turn-over is fast and for that, many companies struggle to position their employees in the right jobs as there seem to be little interest in getting to know employees who may only stay for a short time. As a consequence, it is often frustrating for teams to progress.

 

Personally, the more I learn, the clearer I see that there is a lot more that I don't know, and for that, I need to be surrounded by those who can help me find the answers: as a team. Sharing success, defeat, mistakes and lessons.

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Job Titles Aren't That Important

Job Titles Aren't That Important | on business | Scoop.it
When hiring, companies focus -- at their peril -- on this essentially arbitrary piece of information.
Burutapen's insight:

How many times I have thought about this! In talking to many of my dear friends who are all working in different industries, I have come to realize that box ticking is almost an epidemic. 

 

"I am not what I do", I read once, and this I feel to be true. Your experience is only limited to a set of circumstances you have lived in, and it does not necessarily reflect your ability, capacity or knowledge.

 

I am a true believer in uniqueness and in personal contribution to the work of the team and it often saddens me to look around and discover that those at the top are too used to filling theoretical gaps in the resources chart rather than finding either a perfect fit or an opportunity that will benefit both the candidate and the organization itself... outside the box.

 

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