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A $1,500 DIY Robotic Book Scanner - By Roy Tennant / The Digital Shift

A $1,500 DIY Robotic Book Scanner - By Roy Tennant / The Digital Shift | The Browse | Scoop.it
RT @sml8data: A $1,500 DIY Robotic Book Scanner - The Digital Shift http://t.co/CaFdzlJX #open...

Via Karen du Toit
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Karen du Toit's curator insight, December 4, 2012 4:21 AM

"Recently a Google engineer unveiled a do-it-yourself (DIY) robotic book scanner. As reported by The Verge, Dany Qumsiyeh and a team of colleagues constructed it out of sheet metal, scanner parts, and an ordinary vacuum cleaner to build a page-turning scanner that only requires human intervention to put a book on the device. Scans are automatically sent to a connected laptop. “After a quick 40-second setup,” states the article, “it can digitize a 1000-page book in a little over 90 minutes.”

But perhaps even more amazing is that they have open sourced the plans and patents, thereby providing anyone the ability to do the same thing. Clearly, putting this together takes skills that many of us don’t have, but what it likely means is that some enterprising business will start making the robotic book scanner to capture a market heretofore not well served by scanners that cost tens of thousands of dollars."

 

Open source plans and patents: http://code.google.com/p/linear-book-scanner/

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How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media?

How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media? | The Browse | Scoop.it

C. Shoemaker, H. Martin, B. Joseph (2010) How Using Social Media Forced a Library to Work on the Edge in Their Efforts to Move Youth From “Hanging Out” to “Messing Around, Journal of Media Literacy Education 2:2 (2010) 181 – 184

 

Full Text Research Paper.

 http://altechconsultants.netfirms.com/jmle1/index.php/JMLE/article/view/123/78

 

 

"In 2009, Mimi Ito released Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out: Living and Learning with New Media, a book composed of 23 related studies. These ethnographic studies interrogated how learning is being experienced by teens via informal uses of digital media. The title refers to the framework around how youth learn through digital media and networked spaces, a kind of learning that is quite often invisible to adults who often confuse it with playing, wasting time or, at worst, as undermining youth’s ethical values and social competencies. This collection of studies, however, finds that these three different modes of participation with digital media, in fact, support the development of a wide range of new media literacies. This is the challenge offered by Ito and the one recently taken up by the New York Public Library. This worked example is not designed to report the successes or failure of this pilot project. Rather, it is intended to explore and take a critical look at the obstacles encountered along the way and discuss how they were negotiated. Finally, it will leverage Ito’s framework to provide context to understand what it means to use digital media for learning and how to apply these lessons learned, both for this organization and others."


Via Dennis T OConnor, Karen du Toit
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Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out - Smithsonian (blog), by @Film_Legacy

Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out - Smithsonian (blog), by @Film_Legacy | The Browse | Scoop.it

Smithsonian (blog): Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out

[...] 

"Skip Elsheimer, a media archeologist with A/V Geeks, believes that access to materials is key. “Access is the first step toward preservation,” he said. “When films are online, people can access them and identify areas for research. You can say, ‘You know what? That title’s important because it was made by a special company, or it’s the first time a musician scored something, or it’s an early appearance by an actor.’”

Digital answers some of these access issues, but also raises other questions. “Videotape is going away,” Elsheimer pointed out. “The crushing blow was the tsunamis in Japan last year that hit the Sony tape manufacturing plants. A lot of people changed over to file-based formats at that point.”

But what format do you use? “When YouTube came out, it was a pretty big deal,” Elsheimer said. “We’re still talking to archives who want a YouTube channel, so that’s what the bar is. And that bar’s not very high. But a lot of people just want to see something, even if they’re seeing it in the worst possible quality.”

Elsheimer believes how we watch movies determines the delivery format. “With High Definition, video has gotten bigger, but people are watching it smaller—on iPhones and iPads,” he said. “What’s changing now is the software for reading video files. Final Cut was a big thing for a while, but we’re shifting to another format. Are QuickTime files going to be valuable anymore? Probably not.”


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A free, digital public library is coming - talk by Robert Darnton | Melville House Books

A free, digital public library is coming - talk by Robert Darnton | Melville House Books | The Browse | Scoop.it

Nick Davies:

"At a talk at Columbia Law School on April 2, Harvard University librarian Robert Darnton promised that the Digital Public Library of America, a nonprofit effort to offer free access to millions of digitized books, would become a reality by this time next year.

 

Darnton, a cultural historian and author of The Great Cat Massacre, as well as several notable books about publishing history such as Revolution in Print: the Press in France 1775-1800, was giving a talk titled “Digitize, Democratize: Libraries and the Future of Books” as the featured speaker at the 25th Annual Horace S. Manges Lecture."

 


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