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Keeping brain sharp may ward off Alzheimer's protein

Keeping brain sharp may ward off Alzheimer's protein | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
CHICAGO (Reuters) - People who challenge their brains throughout their lifetimes -- through reading, writing and playing games -- are less likely to develop protein deposits in the brain linked with Alzheimer's,...
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The Brain Might Learn that Way
Understanding how the brain changes and develops
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Frontiers for Young Minds

Frontiers for Young Minds | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Frontiers for Young Minds is a scientific open access journal edited by and for kids.
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Sleep's Link To Learning And Memory Traced To Brain Chemistry

Sleep's Link To Learning And Memory Traced To Brain Chemistry | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
During sleep, the brain locks in existing memories and can even form new ones. Scientists say they are starting to understand how that happens. A midnight snack may interfere.
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Why People Text And Drive, Even When They Know Better

Why People Text And Drive, Even When They Know Better | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
It should come as no surprise that our near-constant use of technology has an impact on the functioning of the brain. And that has a major effect on our behavior.

For example, digital devices "hijack" the prefrontal cortex of the brain,...
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Neuroscience Improves Early Childhood Education Quality

Neuroscience Improves Early Childhood Education Quality | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Who doesn't want the education and care for young children to be high quality? Parents look for it, advocates fight for it, policy makers debate it. But just what is it?...
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Social brain is duped by fake personal interactions —

Social brain is duped by fake personal interactions — | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
RT @autismcrisis: Theory of mind at its finest: nonautistics are totally fooled by fake social interaction http://t.co/yCEN8iVade @SFARIaut…
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From my good friend and collaborator, Elizabeth Redcay's lab...

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First peek at how neurons multitask

First peek at how neurons multitask | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Researchers have shown how a single neuron can perform multiple functions in a model organism, illuminating for the first time this fundamental biological mechanism and shedding light on the human brain.
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The Brain-Games Conundrum: Does Cognitive Training Really Sharpen the Mind?

The Brain-Games Conundrum: Does Cognitive Training Really Sharpen the Mind? | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Donald J Bolger's insight:

Another addition to the brain training debate.

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Less reward, more aversion when learning tricky tasks

Less reward, more aversion when learning tricky tasks | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
We can easily learn by seeking reward or avoiding punishment. But either way, we'd rather have any task be easy. A new study finds a direct behavioral and physiological linkage between those inclinations: When even subtle conflict made an experimental task harder, it affected the perception of reward and punishment, skewing how subjects learned the task.
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Links between grammar, rhythm explored by researchers

Links between grammar, rhythm explored by researchers | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
A child's ability to distinguish musical rhythm is related to his or her capacity for understanding grammar, according to a recent study. The study is the first of its kind to show an association between musical rhythm and grammar.
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Frontiers | Meeting the brain on its own terms | Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

In contemporary human brain mapping, it is commonly assumed that the “mind is what the brain does“. Based on that assumption, task-based imaging studies of the last three decades measured differences in brain activity that are thought to reflect the exercise of human mental capacities (e.g., perception, attention, memory). With the advancement of resting state studies, tractography and graph theory in the last decade, however, it became possible to study human brain connectivity without relying on cognitive tasks or constructs. It therefore is currently an open question whether the assumption that “the mind is what the brain does” is an indispensable working hypothesis in human brain mapping. This paper argues that the hypothesis is, in fact, dispensable. If it is dropped, researchers can “meet the brain on its own terms” by searching for new, more adequate concepts to describe human brain organization. Neuroscientists can establish such concepts by conducting exploratory experiments that do not test particular cognitive hypotheses. The paper provides a systematic account of exploratory neuroscientific research that would allow researchers to form new concepts and formulate general principles of brain connectivity, and to combine connectivity studies with manipulation methods to identify neural entities in the brain. These research strategies would be most fruitful if applied to the mesoscopic scale of neuronal assemblies, since the organizational principles at this scale are currently largely unknown. This could help researchers to link microscopic and macroscopic evidence to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human brain. The paper concludes by comparing this account of exploratory neuroscientific experiments to recent proposals for large-scale, discovery-based studies of human brain connectivity.
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Frontiers | The tale of the neuroscientists and the computer: why mechanistic theory matters | Brain Imaging Methods

The tale of the neuroscientists and the computer: why mechanistic theory matters
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Frontiers | Metacognition and action: a new pathway to understanding social and cognitive aspects of expertise in sport | Cognition

For over a century, psychologists have investigated the mental processes of expert performers - people who display exceptional knowledge and/or skills in specific fields of human achievement. Since the 1960s, expertise researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie such exceptional performance. Whereas the first modern studies of expertise were conducted in relatively formal knowledge domains such as chess, more recent investigations have explored elite performance in dynamic perceptual-motor activities such as sport. Unfortunately, although these studies have led to the identification of certain domain-free generalizations about expert-novice differences, they shed little light on an important issue: namely, experts’ metacognitive activities or their insights into, and regulation of, their own mental processes. In an effort to rectify this oversight, the present paper argues that metacognitive processes and inferences play an important if neglected role in expertise. In particular, we suggest that metacognition (including such processes as ‘meta-attention’, ‘meta-imagery’ and ‘meta-memory’, as well as social aspects of this construct) provides a window on the genesis of expert performance. Following a critique of the standard empirical approach to expertise, we explore some research on ‘metacognition’ and ‘metacognitive inference’ among experts in sport. After that, we provide a brief evaluation of the relationship between psychological skills training and metacognition and comment on the measurement of metacognitive processes. Finally, we summarize our conclusions and outline some potentially new directions for research on metacognition in action.
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Strategic or Random? How the Brain Chooses | HHMI.org

Strategic or Random? How the Brain Chooses | HHMI.org | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Janelia scientists are learning how the brain switches between random and strategic modes.
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Dopamine helps with math rules as well as mood

Dopamine helps with math rules as well as mood | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
The chemical messenger dopamine – otherwise known as the happiness hormone – is important not only for motivation and motor skills. It seems it can also help neurons with difficult cognitive tasks. Torben Ott, Simon Jacob and Professor Andreas Nieder of Tübingen's Institute for Neurobiology have ...
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Study Reports Musicians Show Advantages in Long Term Memory

Study Reports Musicians Show Advantages in Long Term Memory | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Professional musicians might have the edge when it comes to long term memory, a new study reports.
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Finding 'Lost' Languages in the Brain

Finding 'Lost' Languages in the Brain | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
According to a new study, the unconscious brain retains neural patterns of an infant's first language, even if they stop using it.
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This is your brain trying to be funny

This is your brain trying to be funny | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
While comedians think up jokes, activity rises in brain areas involved in reward and making links between opposing ideas
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Experimental Videogame Consoles That Let You Make One Move a Day | WIRED

Experimental Videogame Consoles That Let You Make One Move a Day | WIRED | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Instead of focusing on skills like eye-hand coordination, these games challenge our memory and observation says the designer
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New knowledge about human brain's plasticity

New knowledge about human brain's plasticity | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
The brain's plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers have studied the human brain, and reached some new conclusions.
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Cool new findings on brain development!

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Neuroscience of choking under pressure: New insight

Neuroscience of choking under pressure: New insight | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Everyone knows the scene: a basketball player at the free throw line, bouncing the ball as he concentrates on the basket. It’s a tight game, and his team needs this point. He regularly makes baskets from much farther away while avoiding defenders, but now, when all is calm, he chokes and misses the basket, and his team loses. Recent research suggests that in situations like this, performance depends on two factors: the framing of the incentive in terms of a loss or a gain, and a person’s aversio
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Brain changes linked to prematurity may explain risk of neurodevelopmental disorders

Brain changes linked to prematurity may explain risk of neurodevelopmental disorders | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
The identification of neuroanatomical changes related to prematurity helps explain what brain structure and circuitry are affected, and may lead to designing effective prevention strategies and early interventional treatments for cognitive disabilities.
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The Role and Sources of Individual Differences in Critical-Analytic Thinking: a Capsule Overview - Online First - Springer

The Role and Sources of Individual Differences in Critical-Analytic Thinking: a Capsule Overview - Online First - Springer | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it

Critical-analytic thinking is typically conceived as a meta-construct that arises at the junction of a problem state (i.e., a situation that requires analysis that challenges previous assumptions) and an individual (i.e., an entity with the capacity to exercise critical-analytic thinking). With regard to the latter, there is a substantial body of research focusing on developmental and educational prerequisites for critical-analytic thinking. A less studied aspect of critical-analytic thinking pertains to individual differences, particularly in the set of foundational or componential cognitive skills that embody this construct. The bottom line here is whether, all else being equal (i.e., the same situation and the same developmental/educational stage), there is variation in whether, when, and how people think critically/analytically. We argue that there is unequivocal evidence for both the existence and importance of individual differences in critical-analytic thinking. This review focuses on theoretical and empirical evidence, identifying the cognitive processes that serve as the sources of these individual differences and capturing these processes’ differential contributions to both the critical and analytic components of this construct.

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Pleasure of learning new words

Pleasure of learning new words | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
From our very first years, we are intrinsically motivated to learn new words and their meanings. First language acquisition occurs within a permanent emotional interaction between parents and children. However, the exact mechanism behind the human drive to acquire communicative linguistic skills is yet to be established.
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Metacognition Is the Forgotten Secret to Success

Metacognition Is the Forgotten Secret to Success | The Brain Might Learn that Way | Scoop.it
Insight into our own thoughts, or metacognition, is key to high achievement in all domains
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