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Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog

Smart Teaching: Understanding What the Brain Can’t Ignore | 252 Blog | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Do you know why infographics that combine compelling graphics, charts, lists and texts are so popular and spread so quickly? Our brain processes visual information 60,000 times faster than printed ...

Via Tom Perran
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Great infographic for teachers to think about!

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The Brain and Learning
Using research to help teachers find best practices for learning
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Learn that failure is good

Learn that failure is good | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Children need to be taught that failure is frequent and normal - only by learning to lose can we achieve success.

Via Will Gourley
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Will Gourley's curator insight, April 20, 3:33 PM

Frequent

Attempts

In

Learning

We must be utterly unafraid of failing. In fact it is essential that we do so in order to allow our learners to see how we deal with missing the mark. We must be model effort, reflection, recuperation and redress.

 

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10 Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science | The Unbounded Spirit

10 Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science | The Unbounded Spirit | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
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The Scientific Reasons Why Students Need to Read Fiction

The Scientific Reasons Why Students Need to Read Fiction | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it

Via Anne Leong
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 7, 9:58 AM

It is interesting to read good scholarly work, because they include references to fiction and poetry. It creates a new creative space for humans when we explore fiction.

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20 Study Hacks to Improve Your Memory

20 Study Hacks to Improve Your Memory | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
We’ve scoured our brains and the internet for the best study hacks to help your brain remember information quicker and easier and ultimately help you do better in your exams. 1.

Via Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, April 1, 3:20 AM

Hi-tech, lo-tech and no-tech ways to improve your memory and your performance on exams.

ExamTime's comment, April 1, 3:27 AM
Thanks for sharing Tom and love your comment.
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Daniel Goleman - Common Misconceptions About Focus

Daniel Goleman - Common Misconceptions About Focus | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Daniel Goleman, author of Focus, debunks common myths circulating about how we concentrate.

Via Anne Leong
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6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
6 Targets To Teach The Way The Brain Learns

Via Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 18, 5:15 AM

Use research-based principles of neuroscience  to organize and present materials to maximize student learning.

Sharrock's curator insight, March 18, 6:10 AM

I get excited with research and the implications of research. I value evidence and application over theory and anecdotal information. Validity. The problem will always be in how the research is interpreted and translated/fitted from one setting (the lab) to the classroom (practical use). Neuroscience is relatively new. There is nothing wrong with testing these ideas for use in the classroom though. However, the "Usable classroom translations" are sometimes close in "proximity" to what we educators already believe (indicating perhaps a confirmation bias), or the translations are huge leaps from the research takeaway (the conclusion?). For example, the author references this: "Brain Target 4: Teaching for Mastery
Neuroscience behind it: In order for information to be retained it must make its way from short-term to long-term memory.
Usable classroom translation: Use the arts as a tool to enhance and reinforce learning goals (Rinne, Gregory, Yarmolinskaya, and Hardiman, 2011)".  This doesn't fit with my understanding of evidence. I need a few more connections between the "dots" of research conclusion with the implicated classroom practice.

sarah's curator insight, March 19, 1:45 AM

utile pour nos programmes et pour mieux connaître nos élèves.

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Smarten Up! Three Facts About the Learning Brain | Brain Awareness Week

Smarten Up! Three Facts About the Learning Brain | Brain Awareness Week | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Share these facts with students to spread the word about why good nutrition, sleep, and learning habits matter.
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Five-Minute Film Festival: Learning and the Brain

Five-Minute Film Festival: Learning and the Brain | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Is there anything as mysterious and intriguing as the human brain? It's at the center of everything we do and everything we've created, and yet we're just beginning to understand how it works. Brain A
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35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning

35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it

"Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more? If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment. Here are 35 critical thinking strategies, straight from the mind of Sigmund Freud." | by Sara Briggs


Via Todd Reimer, Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 4, 7:25 PM
Good strategies to incorporate when planning instruction. (some we already use!)
Audrey's curator insight, March 9, 4:10 AM

Some of these are excellent memory methods, which people learn automatically from a very young age. One way to help older learners is to try to get them back to that exciting trial and error style that they had as young children.  

 

Watch babies aged a year plus and see how they are fascinated by simple activities such as picking up a pencil and walking backwards and forwards to drop it at a certain spot, then walking around a table and carrying out the same action again and again. But watch carefully, the spot the pencil has been placed is usually near something else, sometimes a larger object.  

 

One of the things we stop doing as we get older is to enjoy repeating things from different perspectives:  that is learning with stress.  If students looked at what they were learning as something that enhanced their understanding rather than just for passing exams, learning would be memorable and more enjoyable.  You do not need a teacher to' teach' you this.  Most of the psychology-based strategies are inherent.


So parents start children as soon as they start crawling;  leave books, small toys and a variety of different toys around and watch how they learn. NOT EVERYTHING GOES INTO THEIR MOUTHS!!

audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk


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Myth of Creative Inspiration: Great Artists Don't Wait for Motivation

Myth of Creative Inspiration: Great Artists Don't Wait for Motivation | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Becoming creative and doing better work has little to do with feeling inspired or motivated. Read this article to learn how top creatives make their work.

Via Anne Leong
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 28, 10:31 AM

We cannot force creativity, but we can create the circumstances and environment which nurtures it. This might have some application to education.

jewell Moss's curator insight, February 28, 11:31 AM

"Becoming creative and doing better work has little to do with feeling inspired or motivated. Read this article to learn how top creatives make their work."

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How The Memory Works In Learning

How The Memory Works In Learning | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
How The Memory Works In Learning: neuroscience, memory, cognition, judy willis
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Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design

Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it

“ Understanding the basics of the Cognitive Load Theory and applying them to your instructional design is an absolute must, particularly if you want your learners to get the most out of the eLearning course you are creating. This guide will offer you a detailed look at Cognitive Load Theory, including how it can be applied in learning settings. Check the Cognitive Load Theory and Instructional Design article and presentation to find more.”


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Tom Perran's curator insight, February 14, 8:02 AM
Important information for maximizing student achievement
Rescooped by Sally DeCost from Psyche & Neuroscience
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5 Common Mistakes Your Brain Makes Every Day

5 Common Mistakes Your Brain Makes Every Day | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Our brains are pretty amazing, but they can make a lot of mistakes that we are not even aware of. Sometimes these may have negative long-term consequences, but often they just mean a moment of misu...

Via Anne Leong
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David McGavock's curator insight, February 7, 7:23 AM

Some basic ways we misjudge situations and people. Good to remember as we go through day-day.

Karen Bowden's curator insight, February 10, 7:23 AM

1. We trust our memories, even though they are often wrong.

2. We let our expectations decide what we're experiencing.

3. We feel losses more strongly than gains - which can lead to poor decision making.

4. We are highly prone to stereotyping people, even when we consciously try not to.

5. We are not great at predicting odds and probabilities, but we don't realize it.

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The truth about memory

The truth about memory | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Ever walked into a room and forgotten why? You are not alone. Many middle-aged people are convinced they are showing signs of early dementia when in fact they are just showing signs of, well, middle age.
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Why You Forget: 5 Strange Facts About Memory

Why You Forget: 5 Strange Facts About Memory | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Although forgetting is normal and vital to how the brain works, it sometimes happens in strange or unexplained ways.

Via Anne Leong
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The Science of Memory (and 4 Uncommon Ways to Enhance It)

The Science of Memory (and 4 Uncommon Ways to Enhance It) | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Here's a look into the basics of memory: how it works, what types of memory there are and why our memories aren’t as reliable as we think.

Via Dr Mark Weyers
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Parent Cortical Mass's curator insight, April 5, 7:05 AM

Here's an easy to understand explanation of working memory.

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The science of older and wiser

The science of older and wiser | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Since ancient times, the elusive concept of wisdom has figured prominently in philosophical and religious texts. The question remains compelling: What is wisdom, and how does it play out in individual lives? Most psychologists agree that if you...

Via Anne Leong
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How does memory work? | The Edynco blog

How does memory work? | The Edynco blog | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it

Via Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 23, 6:32 AM

Interactive learning map that shows how we get and keep new information

David Baker's curator insight, March 24, 12:20 PM

Memory and the interactive modeling of both how it works and how to support memory are topics of interest for teachers.

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 12, 8:54 PM

If we want to help our students to learn efficiently, we should know something about functioning of our memory.

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Move Your Body, Grow Your Brain

Move Your Body, Grow Your Brain | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have
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Rescooped by Sally DeCost from Cognitive Neuroscience
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The Brain Science Behind Gut Decisions

The Brain Science Behind Gut Decisions | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
What parts of the brain are activated when we make a gut decision?Dr. Dan Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, explained the complex process of how our minds and

Via Sandeep Gautam
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35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning

35 Psychology-Based Learning Strategies For Deeper Learning | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it

"Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentations during your lectures? Urged your students to memorize more in order to remember more? If the answer is no, you may want to rethink your notions of psychology and its place in the learning environment. Here are 35 critical thinking strategies, straight from the mind of Sigmund Freud." | by Sara Briggs


Via Todd Reimer, Tom Perran
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 4, 7:25 PM
Good strategies to incorporate when planning instruction. (some we already use!)
Audrey's curator insight, March 9, 4:10 AM

Some of these are excellent memory methods, which people learn automatically from a very young age. One way to help older learners is to try to get them back to that exciting trial and error style that they had as young children.  

 

Watch babies aged a year plus and see how they are fascinated by simple activities such as picking up a pencil and walking backwards and forwards to drop it at a certain spot, then walking around a table and carrying out the same action again and again. But watch carefully, the spot the pencil has been placed is usually near something else, sometimes a larger object.  

 

One of the things we stop doing as we get older is to enjoy repeating things from different perspectives:  that is learning with stress.  If students looked at what they were learning as something that enhanced their understanding rather than just for passing exams, learning would be memorable and more enjoyable.  You do not need a teacher to' teach' you this.  Most of the psychology-based strategies are inherent.


So parents start children as soon as they start crawling;  leave books, small toys and a variety of different toys around and watch how they learn. NOT EVERYTHING GOES INTO THEIR MOUTHS!!

audrey curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk


Rescooped by Sally DeCost from Psyche & Neuroscience
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Train Your Brain To Let Go Of Habits – 10 Methods For Creating New Neural Pathways

Train Your Brain To Let Go Of Habits – 10 Methods For Creating New Neural Pathways | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Source: www.marilyngordon.com | Original Post Date: April 16, 2011 - When you understand how neural pathways are created in the brain, you get a front row seat for truly comprehending how to let go of habits. Neural ...

Via Anne Leong
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Science Shows Making Lessons Relevant Really Matters

Science Shows Making Lessons Relevant Really Matters | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Credit: iStockphoto




Good news for good teachers: It turns out, the old drill-and-kill method is not only boring, but -- neurologically speaking -- pretty useless. Relevant, meaningful activ
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Why The Brain Benefits From Reflection In Learning

Why The Brain Benefits From Reflection In Learning | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Why The Brain Benefits From Reflection In Learning
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Want To Be More Productive? Buy Some Desk Plants

Want To Be More Productive? Buy Some Desk Plants | The Brain and Learning | Scoop.it
Seriously like yesterday. Office vegetation offers micro-restoration--the chance for our brains to recharge throughout the day.

Via The BioSync Team
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The BioSync Team's curator insight, November 19, 2013 9:07 AM


Never go to a doctor whose office plants have died.
—Erma Bombeck


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