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The brain and illusions
What can illusions teach us about the brain?
Curated by Gerald Carey
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The science behind gambling superstitions: It's all about the illusion of control

The science behind gambling superstitions: It's all about the illusion of control | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
If the average gambler had one wish, odds are he’d want one of two things: an endless supply of cash to gamble or an endless supply of luck to win. Unfortunately, such wishes don’t exist. But many gamblers make do with superstition.
Gerald Carey's insight:

Although this is from a Casino site, it is an interesting set of examples of superstitions amongst gamblers.  Certainly the range of methods that punters use to increase their luck is intriguing.

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Satta Matka Mumbai's comment, October 9, 2014 5:37 AM
Yes it is there. When it comes to guessing anu number or anything for Gambling Game. Here we can see, if we guess number for Satta Matka that is also the same thing what you are sharing.
tom familetti's curator insight, November 5, 2014 4:20 PM

This article is interesting to me because many people are superstitious about various different things, but nothing epitomizes superstition like gambling superstitions!  Whenever anyone goes gambling all they want is some luck. In reality, all that luck you think you are getting from some object or ritual is really your brain trying to fill in the gaps to make it seem like you have control.  This article does a good job of explaining that and giving good examples of gambling superstitions.  In poker luck is less relevant then other games, such as blackjack or roulette, because there is more strategy involved, but everyone still wants Lady Luck on their side!

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Why businessmen around the world are so superstitious - Economic Times

Why businessmen around the world are so superstitious - Economic Times | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
Why businessmen around the world are so superstitiousEconomic TimesPsychologists call this magical thinking, because this behaviour of the child does not arise from any comprehension of or concern about the link between the cause and the...
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Sporting superstitions: Why do we have them?

Sporting superstitions: Why do we have them? | The brain and illusions | Scoop.it
How psychology experiments on hungry pigeons can explain sports champions' (and our) curious habits and rituals.
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