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The Boyle-ing Point
“We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and to know the place for the first time.” – T.S. Eliot
Curated by Emma Boyle
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When The West Had An ISIS

When The West Had An ISIS | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Michael Brendan Dougherty remembers when the English state and its religious manifestation, the Church of England, behaved like ISIS toward the Irish: Convert,
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What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak

What You Need to Know About the Ebola Outbreak | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Questions and answers on the scale of the outbreak and the science of the Ebola virus.

Via Seth Dixon
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Raven Blair's curator insight, August 21, 10:10 AM

I believe that the reason the Ebola outbreak was so bad in West Africa was because of the overpopulation and lack of medical resources. Attempts of containing the virus are being made by asking for the travel history of anyone that comes into the US with a fever. If they had been to West Africa, then they are screened and tested. Alarms have been raised in New York City at 3 hospitals, but no Ebola cases have turned up.

 

~Raven Blair

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, August 21, 10:16 AM

The Ebola virus is a very frightening virus. The fact that there is a chance it could spread to the United States is also scary. Hopefully there will be a cure found for this virus. The side effects of Ebola could be fatal, until there is a cure we should prevent to many trips to areas near West Africa.

Alex Lewis's curator insight, August 27, 9:53 AM

More than 2,600 people in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone have become infected with the Ebola virus since March. The Ebola Virus is spreading rapidly between not only African and less developed countries, but also being transported to some more developed countries, such as the United States. There are so many different things we have to bring attention to, this included. The people in Africa are transferring the disease more rapidly, in my opinion, due to the lack of medical attention and the lack of space and resources.

                                     Alex Lewis

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The Irish Abbey that Refused to Die - Aleteia

The Irish Abbey that Refused to Die - Aleteia | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Mass has been celebrated at Ballintubber Abbey every day for 800 years.
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Rio favela continues to reap fruits from World Youth Day

Rio favela continues to reap fruits from World Youth Day | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
After nearly two years of preparation, Father José Almy Gomes, 40, almost wasn’t ready for Pope Francis’ World Youth Day pilgrimage to Rio de Janeiro.
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The Middle East Friendship Chart

The Middle East Friendship Chart | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
With overlapping civil wars in Syria and Iraq, a new flare-up of violence between Israel and the Palestinians, and tense nuclear talks with Iran, Middle Eastern politics are more volatile than ever and longtime alliances are shifting. Here's a guide to who's on whose side in the escalating chaos. Click...
Emma Boyle's insight:

An interactive chart attempting to explain the geopolitical situation of Southwest Asia and North Africa

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Is History Really Over? - Aleteia

Is History Really Over? - Aleteia | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
With authoritarian regimes resurgent in many parts of the world, the triumph of liberal democracy is not inevitable.
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Look Homeward, LeBron - NYTimes.com

Look Homeward, LeBron - NYTimes.com | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Emma Boyle's insight:

Literally every topic is human geography.

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World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."


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Pierre Mongin 's curator insight, July 20, 3:54 PM

Un exemple sur la manière dont les cartes peuvent changer votre vision du monde, le " mapping" a ce pouvoir là. 

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.
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Virginia Today! - Imgur

Virginia Today! - Imgur | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
A map of what Virginia is really like.
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Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine

Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
World War II-era maps conjure a period in history when titanic forces were on the move, or were stuck in brutal stalemate, all over the globe.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lee Hall's curator insight, May 30, 9:42 AM

You can also find film footage of Capa's picture of the man in the surf of Normandy that was later published in Life magazine.

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A Tale of Two Catholic Churches

A Tale of Two Catholic Churches | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
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What U.S. History Would Have Been Like With Hashtags

What U.S. History Would Have Been Like With Hashtags | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 14, 3:41 PM

This collection isn't meant to be serious, but these images would get students to think about how historical events were played out and see the internal social and political dynamics in ways that they can relate to. 

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Michelangelo, Renaissance man, 450 years after his death

Michelangelo, Renaissance man, 450 years after his death | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
August 26, 2014. Exhibit in Rome shows the artists least known work.
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Here's a mesmerizing map of Twitter activity from Ferguson

Here's a mesmerizing map of Twitter activity from Ferguson | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Twitter has become the undisputed champion of breaking news — a title is has successfully defended over the past two weeks in Ferguson, Missouri.
Emma Boyle's insight:

Tracking Twitter activity between August 11 - August 18.

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Test your geography knowledge with a fun quiz game - Komando

Test your geography knowledge with a fun quiz game - Komando | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Test your geography knowledge with a fun quiz game
Komando
It's hours of fun and a great way to brush up on your geography and history too. Enjoy! Note: Sometimes the map will zoom in on a region if it's a very specific answer.
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Cupcakes vs. Doughnuts: Tool Visualizes Yelp Trends Over Time

Cupcakes vs. Doughnuts: Tool Visualizes Yelp Trends Over Time | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Have cupcakes ever been less popular than doughnuts in D.C.?
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The World the Great War Swept Away by @peggynoonannyc

The World the Great War Swept Away by @peggynoonannyc | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
In 1914, Europe was prosperous and what followed was unimaginable, Peggy Noonan writes.
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This map shows the disease most likely to kill you

This map shows the disease most likely to kill you | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
A country-by-country comparison
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James Lileks - Death of Venice

James Lileks - Death of Venice | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Urbanists often use European cities as a model for everything that’s right and true and good about cities. American cities are spread out, so people have to drive along, instead of standing on a public transport next to a man who is muttering about chemtrails and has the personal funk of a Dumpster outside a urinalysis lab. European cities are compact, with everyone living on top of one another in picturesque piles with the square footage of the average American auto trunk. European cities are Walkable, which is the chief virtue nowadays. Well, ancient Rome was Walkable. A collection of Neolithic huts was Walkable. Apparently American cities are strewn with tacks and rattlesnakes and feature large open pits with spikes on the bottom. No one can walk there.

There’s one city no one seems to hold up as a model, and that’s Venice. I was just there for a while, and it’s an astonishing place — for reasons we can surely adapt here.

#ad#One. No cars. It is simple to ban cars from all streets with Venice-style zoning, which ensures that most streets are three feet wide. You couldn’t get Orson Welles down these passageways without greasing both sides and shooting him out of a cannon. There are streets in this town where two people who meet going the opposite way cannot pass, but local customs dictate that the person who is taller gets down on hands and knees and the other person climbs over him. No car can enter the streets of Venice unless you lower it into a plaza with a helicopter.

Two. It is quite walkable, and your journeys will give you that marvelous sense of discovery and surprise the urbanists seek. By which I mean, you will be lost. The maps are no help; you’re on a small street named Contradore Della Caravaggissimo Magiori di Luchese, and the map shows C. del Car.Ma.Lu, if you’re lucky. And it’s in the type that makes the bottom line of an eye chart look like a tabloid headline the day war is declared.

Three. It is better than walkable: it is swimmable, and thus provides an excellent form of exercise. Remarkably, the concept of swimming from your house to work never seems to have been popular, for the same reason most people don’t bike to work: You arrive at the office wet and smelly.

Four. It is dense, but with many open spaces where people can congregate and do public-type things, like have a gelato or hang a thief, depending on your era. These squares are called campi, from the old Latin word for “field.” In the early days of Venice, when each island was its own political unit, each campo had a palazzo for the local bossman, dwellings for the citizens, and a church from which the campo now takes its name. There is also a cistern that supplied water not completely contaminated with natural pathogens, and they’re usually decorated with allegorical carvings that depict cherubim holding forth goblets, worn by time into indistinct shapes that remind you half a millennium has passed since the artist put down his tools.

“Half a millennium,” in fact, seems the average unit of time that’s elapsed since anything was built. When we took a water taxi to the airport at six a.m., we stepped down stones that may have predated the first American colony, and looming above in the morning light was a baroque edifice of such ornate extravagance it brought to mind Goethe’s characterization of architecture: frozen music. If you walked 100 paces you’d find another, and another beyond that; if the door was open, the crepuscular interior had visual riches that stunned you to silence and reverence — if not for God, then for the mind of man who could conjure such froth and frosting out of stone, throw the ceiling high in the air, and decorate it with clouds and robed saints twisting up into the empyrean beyond. They are places of joy and wonder.

They are also deserted.

Not just because showtime comes later. In Europe you get the sense that religion is an outdated operating system that won’t load on modern terminals. There’s no way Venice, a city of 50,000 souls — roughly, Fargo, N.D., in 1976 — can support this many enormous churches. The weekly take on Sunday isn’t enough to cover the cost of floor wax, let alone patching a roof from the days of Christopher Columbus.

#page#Still, they’re impressive. Solid and eternal. Less so the housing: The ground floor of Venice is packed with restaurants and shops, but above are beaten shutters with peeling paint, flaked stucco, cracked walls; it has a ruined charm, the sense of a long decay that measures the tick of the second hand in decades. It’s only when you look down from the hotel roof at night that you realize the city is dark. As far as you can see, there’s nothing to see. The lights are off. No one’s home.

Well, not entirely. The city has residents, but as the tour guide explained, they’re the uno per cento. The occupied palazzos and apartment buildings cost vast quantities of Euros. A fortune is required to rehab the ancient structures, and many end up as hotels. Tourists, you sense, are the real residents of Venice, a population that streams in from ships and planes, and mills around like interchangeable red-blood cells through the stone capillaries, replaced every day.

#ad#One night we came across a university graduation in San Marco. Hundreds of chairs, a big stage, banners congratulating the studenti. Afterward almost every campo and every street had a knot of grads carousing around, singing a ditty that began “Dottore, Dottore” — you sensed that if someone started singing it, everyone had to. (The lyrics are utterly obscene.) The highlight of their lives, perhaps — to be young and newly graduated in Venice on a warm summer night, the 19th-century lamps glowing above, the plosh of the gondolier’s oar in the water below the bridge, the narrow streets alive like no other city in the world, really. It puts to shame your own tenure at a flat Midwestern school, where the columned mall was an ersatz retread of this. Of Europe. Of the real thing.

Then again, you have a job, which is why you can afford to visit Venice. What’s ahead for the students? The next day we went to a small art museum on an island where they’ve put the modern art, as if to quarantine the stuff so it doesn’t infect the churches. The exhibition was dedicated to abstract glass. One room had four wavy mirrors the size of record albums, hung one per wall, as if they were Old Masters that needed proper space to breathe and reveal their mysteries. There were about ten staff members and four visitors. Five young women ran the front desk. Each gallery had a young fellow in a nice suit standing around waiting for someone to touch something. They looked horribly bored. You suspected that each had a college degree. Or two.

It’s always unwise to extrapolate anything about a place based on a fortnight of wandering and gawking, but you can’t help but think that Venice is southern Europe incarnate: lovely, old, its churches great sets for a play that closed years ago. It doesn’t make anything except dinner and good coffee. Maybe that’s enough. It had a good run. It would be rude to expect it to invent something or create a new industry. It’s just enough for it to (a) be Venice, and (b) not sink.

The last day we were there, San Marco plaza flooded. The water came up and the tourists splashed around and took pictures, like people at Disneyland playing in the fountains that spray water from jets in the pavement. A storm rose around six, and apocalyptic clouds rolled in and lanced the sea with lightning bolts. The downpour began; the street vendors put away their fake bags and started selling genuine umbrellas; people fled for cafés, and the city was empty.

I took shelter in a church by our hotel, expecting the usual astonishments, and was not disappointed. An altarpiece depicting the life of Moses rose above like stone smoke unraveling into the heavens. Heard some Latin; in the corner, a priest was finishing Mass for a half-dozen people. So it wasn’t over for them after all. There were still a few who came here for shelter. Afterward the priest and the congregants had a conversation, and I eavesdropped.

They were all Americans.

— James Lileks is a columnist for National Review Online.
Emma Boyle's insight:

A fun but poignant look at urban change in an iconic city.

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On Ill-Gotten Gains

On Ill-Gotten Gains | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Christine Niles visited La Musée d’Art Sacré in Dijon where the government of France, a nation once known as the “eldest daughter of the Church,” celebrates its anti-Catholic history.
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Why the Death of Western Catholicism is Great for the Church - Aleteia

Why the Death of Western Catholicism is Great for the Church - Aleteia | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Rapidly vanishing cultural Catholicism is bringing the Church back to what she was always meant to be.
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Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I

Europe’s Landscape Is Still Scarred by World War I | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Photographs of the abandoned battlefields reveal the trenches’ scars still run deep

Via Seth Dixon
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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 28, 7:52 PM
Humans change landscapes
Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 8:48 PM

"Lest we ever forget"... 

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, June 2, 7:47 PM

A geographical perspective of World War 1.

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Enuf or Enough? Why Is English Spelling So Random? | Dictionary.com Blog

Enuf or Enough? Why Is English Spelling So Random? | Dictionary.com Blog | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Have you had enough (or enuf) trouble spelling to make you want to scream (or skreem?) You are not alone. Since the 17th century, scholars have been protesting
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Partially Banning Cars for a Day in Paris Actually Worked

Partially Banning Cars for a Day in Paris Actually Worked | The Boyle-ing Point | Scoop.it
Road traffic dropped by 18 percent, and PM-10 pollution dropped by 6 percent.

Via geographil, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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