The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs
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Afghan police: Man kills wife for giving birth to daughter instead of son

Afghan police: Man kills wife for giving birth to daughter instead of son | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
Police in the northern Afghanistan province of Kunduz are looking for a man they say strangled his wife after she bore him a third child that was not a son.
Courtney Davis's insight:

This article is basically summarizing about a man and his mother that kills his wife because she hasn't given him a son after he's impregnated her 3 times and he doesn't like that all she's given him is girls. With the help of his mother, he killed his wife by beating her then finally strangling her to death. He then fled the scene because he didn't want the entire country knowing he killed someone, so he fled and finally the police caught the mother, but she came up with a totally different story so they would stop looking for her son which in my opinion whether they get 3 different stories or just 1 story, they should still look for him because he needs to be punished for such a horrible crime he committed of manslaughter. The numbers of violence of women in Afghanistan are just through the roof year by year. This story was posted in 2012 but  in 2011 their were 1,026 reported cases according to CNN, also in 2010  there were 2,700 cases reported of violence according to CNN. A quote that  really popped out to me was "And there is a heavy cultural pressure to bear sons, who are viewed as the breadwinners, she said, with the birth of a daughter seen as a burden rather than something to celebrate." (CNN) This popped out to me because its saying that if a girl is born, then they are just nothing, but if a boy is born then he is praised like god and is the one and only and is the best out of the children. I know that boys are important in Afghanistan because they are the future soliders but lets not treat the girls as though they are nothing, they provide meals, take care of families while the men are out working, so technically the girls aren't just there, they have a purpose in life.

  

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Interview with author and journalist Asne Seierstad - The National

Interview with author and journalist Asne Seierstad - The National | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
Ahead of the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair, Seierstad talks about the fine line between journalism and fiction
Courtney Davis's insight:

After reading this interview and seeing how Asne lived in Kabul for 3 months after the fall of the Taliban, it really struck me that she said she was there during the uprising of it all. Asne really got to see what life was like for 3 months in Kabul, and what it was like to wear a burqa, and what it's like to hide for 3 months from the world. She is a brave women for having the courage to leave her family for 3 months to follow a real bookseller in Kabul and to follow what life is really like for all the people that reside out there.

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Women for Afghan Women

Women for Afghan Women | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
Women for Afghan Women
Courtney Davis's insight:

WAW also known as Women for Afghan Women is an advocacy group that is out to help insure rights to women in Afghanistan. They are out to secure the women and make sure they know they're rights and what they are entitled too. The main page of the site caught my eye because its shows the women who are need, and I wish I could help them because not knowing your rights as a women and knowing they're being pushed around like they're nothing, sickens me. This is why women's rights should stand out more and be equal to men's rights throughout the different countries of Afghanistan.

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Protecting Afghan Women From Abuse - NYTimes.com

Protecting Afghan Women From Abuse - NYTimes.com | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
A new Constitution and the work of a community of women’s advocates are creating a more egalitarian notion of women’s rights in Afghanistan.
Courtney Davis's insight:

This article is talking about how Afghan women are slowly regaining their rights and freedom in life. Women are slowly regaining their rights and freedom because of on-e woman who showed everyone who was boss. According to The New York Times the name of the miraculous women is Mariam and her story says that her parents married off for not love but to cover their debt that the father made by doing drugs. Mariam was treated like all the other women in Afghanistan by being married off and if she did anything wrong she was beaten. As it states in the article, it says that since Mariam couldn't give her husband a child she was beaten by her husband and by his mother. Women being beaten in Afghanistan is a normal thing, but to us in America its not even near normal. If a women is beaten in America, it's the total opposite of Afghanistan because in the America the man is accused and is given the punishment if he beats the women, when in Afghanistan if the man beats the women it's the women's fault she is getting beaten, the man thinks he has many excuses for beating his wife.  
    

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The Bookseller of Kabul

The Bookseller of Kabul | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
Primary Source-- By Asne Seierstad
Courtney Davis's insight:

The Bookseller of Kabul is mainly about a bookseller named Sultan Khan, and he allows a journalist (the author) to move into his home and experience what life is like after the fall of the Taliban, and experience family life as a women in Kabul.The author got to see many different sides to all the characters of the book because she see's that marrying another women without getting a divorce is normal, and making the wives live together is nothing new in the home of the bookseller. She also experienced what it's like to live with all the family members of cousins, aunts, and uncles all under one roof. As a reader I embarked on many parts of the story, from the marriages that took place, and how a bride is chosen by the other family, how Sultan's son, Mansur, embarks on a journey on his own to find his religion, and to see the youngest daughter Leila seek a job out of the family business instead of marrying someone that was chosen for her by her family. Reading this book made me realize the difference of lifestyles we experience in America  to how they live in Kabul, and the marriages, and business are way different. They are different because if Sultan bought any new books and the city found out, he would be arrested, and taken to jail for the evening, that just makes no sense whatsoever. 
   

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Cut from Different Cloth • Burqas and Beliefs

In 2005, documentary filmmakers Clif Orloff and Olga Shalygin returned to Afghanistan’s northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif.
Courtney Davis's insight:

  "Cut from Different Cloth" could mean many different things depending on who you say it to. In this documentary it is stating that your burqa is your lifeline to leave your house when your husband says you can. It lets you have basically no freedom when your out in public because your entire body is covered, even your eyes. Cliff and Olga have been married for a while and they go on what they call "adventures around the world" and they came back to Northern Afghanistan bringing along Olga's stepdaughter Serena. Serena is a unique girl because she is a dancer, so when she came to Mazari with her stepmother and father, she had to follow all the guidelines that the women in Afghanistan follow on a day to day basis. She went to town to buy a burqa because she didn't own one and everybody looked down on her when she arrived because she didn't even have a head scarf on to wrap her head. Throughout the documentary we follow many different girls and women because the way they are cut from different cloth is how their beliefs are stated. A particular girl that stood out to me was the 13 year old girl, and according to the documentary her parents married her off at the age of 7 to a man who was 70 years, 10 times her age. In my eyes I see that marrying off your children to older men is just cruel, and according to the interview they had with the annonomyous girl (she wanted to keep her name private) she was sold so that her family could flee Afghanistan and feed themselves. They sold her off and the man abused her and slept with her, and now that she is wanting a divorce at the age of 13, the man said she must pay back the funds that the man paid to buy her, and if she doesn't, she doesn't get the divorce, and could possibly be killed by all the abuse he puts her through. The girl is no longer worth as much money as she was before because she's no longer a virgin according to the documentary. This is my opinion on being "Cut from Different Cloth" and why womens rights are just as important as men's rights.       
    

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Afghan Women Suffering from Forced Marriage, In-Laws Violence

Afghan Women Suffering from Forced Marriage, In-Laws Violence | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
How women really suffer.
Courtney Davis's insight:

In this news article its referring to families of girls and women that are handing off them off to men, sometimes complete strangers that are half of their age. In Afghanistan it's believed that the mother and father are to give the daughter off to marry, the daughter cannot marry to someone she wants,  the mother and father decide for her. In this article it's talking about how in 2007 after the post-Taliban that women are still suffering from forced marriage, and the worst is violence in the home of the in-laws. 
    
    
    
    
    
   

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The Storyteller's Daughter

The Storyteller's Daughter | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
The vivid, often startling memoir of a young woman shaped by two dramatically disparate worlds.
Courtney Davis's insight:

As I was scrolling through recommendations that were related to the book I read, I found this book, and it stood out to me because it says it's about one women's return to her lost homeland to find who she really is. As she goes to her lost homeland she experiences dramatic events and entraps her self in a burqa, and learns what life is reallly like behind the veil. I would most likely read this book because it sounds interesting to what life is like when you experience what life is like behind the veil and when you learn what your real family traditions are what meeting your extended family is really like.

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A Bed of Red Flowers

A Bed of Red Flowers | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
As a young girl growing up in 1970s Afghanistan, Nelofer Pazira seems destined for a bright future. The daughter of liberal-minded professionals, she enjoys a safe, loving and privileged life.
Courtney Davis's insight:

After reading The Bookseller of Kabul, and getting other insight on books that are similar, I would intend to read A Bed of Red Flowers because it's similar to the book I read, and even though The Bookseller of Kabul was very confusing, this book seems to make more sense. This books seems interesting because it's set in Afghanistan, and is about a young girl who is close to my age trying to find her place in life. Finding her place in life is a lot harder then it really sounds because she has so many rules to follow while being apart of the Afghanistan culture, and having to follow so many rules to follow.

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Burqa's

Burqa's | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
Courtney Davis's insight:

The Burqa is an important factor in the women's lives that life in Afghanistan because it's the only thing that lets them leave their house on a daily basis, or when needed to go out in front of other men that are not their husband or family members. The burqa is a very thin fabric either silk, or a lightweight cotton. To women these burqas are huge inconveniences because every time a women wants to go out she has to collect her belongings, a boy/man that will walk with her because she can't go out alone, and her huge burqa that fits over her head. The burqa fits over the head with a head cover that's like a wig cap, but not as thin, and once its over the head, the women puts the rest of the fabric around her body to cover her front and behind area. According to the Afghanistan laws all women are required to wear a burqa in public, because only family members and their husbands are allowed to see what they look like from the head down. People in the town if they go out are to not see anything, and if they burqa is taken off then they are in a huge violation with the law and with their husbands. The punishment of taking off their burqa can lead to a simple hit from the husband or they can be beaten and starved for a couple of days if they take it off. 
  

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Setting: Kabul, Afghanistan

Setting: Kabul, Afghanistan | The Bookseller of Kabul: Burqa's and Beliefs | Scoop.it
Courtney Davis's insight:

Kabul, Afghanistan is the largest city in Afghanistan, it's also the capital of Afghanistan. Kabul has one of the only universities in the entire country of Afghanistan, it's called Kabul University, and it was established in 1932 and also stated as one of the most important universities in the country. Population of Kabul is the same as if your living in one of the 50 states of the United States, the poplulation is about one million people living there to this day. This is Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan.

 

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