The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions
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The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions
Tells about the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.
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Vocabulary

1. Harlem Renaissance- was a cultural movement that spanned the 1920s and 1930s. At the time, was known as the “New Negro Movement.
*The Harlem Renaissance was a good time period for the African American community.
2. Renaissance- the culture and style of art and architecture developed during this era.
*It threatens to undermine the renaissance now being experienced in some of our urban centers.
3. Literature- written works, esp. those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit.
*Langston Hughes' poems were a great work of literature
4. Ballad- a poem or song narrating a story in short stanzas.
*Langston Hughes Ballad of Booker T. received a lot of good credit.
5. Accommodations- the process of adapting or adjusting to someone or something.
*Accommodation to a separate political entity was not possible
6. Compartment- a separate section or part of something, in particular. *There's some ice cream in the freezer compartment.
7. Exposition- a comprehensive description and explanation of an idea or theory.
*The exposition and defense of his ethics
8. Evolving- to develop gradually, esp. from a simple to a more complex form.
*The company has evolved into a major chemical manufacturer
9. Melody- a sequence of single notes that is musically satisfying.
*He picked out an intricate melody on his guitar
10. Era- a long and distinct period of history with a particular feature or characteristic.
*There was a lot of new music in the new era.
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News Website Today 1: The Harlem Renaissance’s Effect on Modern Culture | Teen Essay

News Website Today 1: The Harlem Renaissance’s Effect on Modern Culture | Teen Essay | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This website is an essay by a teen. The teen talks about the impact that the Harlem Renaissance has had on the communties today.

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Historical Website 2: Harlem Renaissance 1920s

Historical Website 2: Harlem Renaissance 1920s | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This webiste gave information about the new music, literature, and art that was evolving from the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem had a lot of new arts, music and poetry that people from around the country wanted to come see.

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Primary Document 3: The Ballad of Booker T.

Primary Document 3: The Ballad of Booker T. | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

Langston Hughes wrote this poem honoring Booker T. Washington in 1941. The lines "Let down your bucket / Where you are" come from Washington's famous 1895 speech in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Cotton States and International Exposition. Born a slave in Virginia in 1856, Washington was the founder of the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama in 1881. Under his leadership the institute became the largest and most famous school for African Americans in the South, and he became the best-known African American leader in the nation. This is why he was a good example of African American leadership during the Harlem Renaissance.

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Primary Document 1: Supreme Court Ruling

Primary Document 1: Supreme Court Ruling | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This document is about the decision of the ruling of the Supreme Court that upheld the Louisiana state law that allowed for the equal but separate accommodations for the and colored races. Homer Plessy walked on to the East Louisiana Railroad train. He took a seat in the white compartment. He was then arrested and charged for breaking the law. This was one of the African Americans way of trying to move foward, by trying new things. 

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The Roaring 20s: Harlem Renaissance

After WWI, all of the soldiers returned home. When they came home, women and African Americans had their jobs and they wanted them back. The African Americans didn’t want to give up the jobs, so a lot of hate crimes started in the south. This led to the Great Migration. African Americans fled to the north for more job opportunities and better social lives. One of places that a lot of African Americans migrated to was Harlem, New York. With so many African Americans living in Harlem, this started the Harlem Renaissance. African Americans novelists, poets, dancer, singers and musicians began to express themselves freely. Authors wrote of the joys and pains of being African American Singers and musicians combined Swing with blues and created a new genre of music called Jazz. New artist started to create new arts that were more bold, stylized, and filled with lots of imagery.With all these new things being created, more and more people from all over were becoming more interested.

The Harlem Renaissance had a huge impact on dance, music, and art.
Jazz became a major thing that all kinds of people liked, no matter what race you were. With more races opening up to Jazz, African Americans were starting to perform for white audiences, breaking the performance race barrier. Jazz was played on radio across the US. Flappers were creating new dances to the New Jazz Music. With the new music and dances, women had broken barriers too. They were not acting like the average American women/ housewife/ mother; they were having fun being different. They created new hairstyles and new fashion in the 1920s for women. New art like Art deco came about. During the Harlem Renaissance, artist started to paint different pictures and this became a new big thing. No one wanted to paint a boring orange; they were combining traditional motifs with machine age imagery and materials. The Harlem Renaissance gave not only the African Americans the freedom of expression, but gave America a new view on thing. But as the 1920s came to an end so did the Harlem Renaissance, and African Americans went back to the underground.
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News Website Today 2: Famous Places of the Harlem Renaissance

News Website Today 2: Famous Places of the Harlem Renaissance | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This website talks about all of the famous places that are famous today that were key factors on the Harlem Renaissance.

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Historical Website 3: Harlem Renaissance — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts

Historical Website 3: Harlem Renaissance — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This website gives ALL of the information that you would want, or need, to know. It has information about the music, dances, arts and literature, background information, politcal and basic leaders. This website tells all.

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Historical Website 1: Harlem Renaissance: 1920s' African-American Cultural Revolution

Historical Website 1: Harlem Renaissance: 1920s' African-American Cultural Revolution | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This website basically explains the basics about my topic. It tells about the beginning of the Harlem renaissance, where it began, who was involved, and why it started. Gives some background information about the whole era.

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Primary Document 2: Apollo Invitation

Primary Document 2: Apollo Invitation | The Harlem Renaissance: 1920s Evolutions | Scoop.it

This document is a newsletter talking about the apollo. It was telling about a concert for the Sunset Royal Band. This was one of the new music groups during the Harlem Renaissance. Music played a big part in the Harlem Renaissance. All kinds of people were interested in the new music that was coming from the Harlem Renaissance.

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