The Aesthetic Ground
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The Aesthetic Ground
Exploring the 'Middle' in a Soft Matter through Artistic Manifestations
Curated by Xaos
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Jessica Drenk

Jessica Drenk | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
G.U.M+D Galleri Urbane Marfa + Dallas                                  
Xaos's insight:
Jessica Drenk was raised in Montana, where she developed an appreciation for the natural world that remains an important inspiration to her artwork today.  Tactile and textural, her sculptures highlight the chaos and beauty that can be found in simple materials. Drenk's work is also influenced by systems of information and the impulse to develop an encyclopedic understanding of the world. In 2006, Drenk was awarded the  International Sculpture Center's Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.  Her work has been pictured in Sculpture Magazine and seen in shows at the International Grounds for Sculpture in New Jersey, the Albuquerque Museum, the Tucson Museum of Art, the International Book Fair of Contemporary Creative Books in Marseilles, France, as well as galleries across the United States. In 2009, Drenk received an Artist Project Grant from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, funding the installation of Archaeologica: A Museum of the Disposable at the Mesa Arts Center in Mesa, Arizona.  In 2010 her work was featured in shows at Conrad Wilde Gallery in Tucson, Catherine Person Gallery in Seattle, and Aqua Art Miami contemporary art fair in Miami Beach. In 2011 Drenk is also exhibiting at Cain Schulte Gallery in San Francisco. Drenk has an MFA from the University of Arizona, graduated Cum Laude from Pomona College, and is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa academic honor society.
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Banks Violette: Vinyl Aesthetics

Banks Violette talks about his new show at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac in Paris, for Nowness.com
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In his recent show at Maureen Paley in London, 34-year-old artist Banks Violette projected the image of the white, galloping horse from the opening of TriStar Pictures movies on water vapor being blown by a fan. In many ways, Violette was referencing a work by one of his heroes, Jack Goldstein, who looped the roaring MGM lion in a 1975 video piece. Violette's TriStar horse keeps running, and the everlasting lifespan of the hackneyed image is very much a part of the New York artist's experiments. Specifically, Violette focuses on youth and subcultures (black is his frequent working color), simultaneously celebrating their revolt and revealing the queasy way they recycle images and slogans to keep themselves alive.

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Eva Hesse

Eva Hesse (1936-1970), was a German-born American sculptor, known for her pioneering work in materials such as latex, fiberglass, and plastics. After graduat...
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Eva Hesse (1936-1970), was a German-born American sculptor, known for her pioneering work in materials such as latex, fiberglass, and plastics.
After graduating from New York's School of Industrial Art in 1952, Hesse studied at New York's Pratt Institute (1952--1953) and Cooper Union (1954--1957), then at the Yale School of Art and Architecture (1957--1959), where she studied under Josef Albers and received a B.F.A. Upon returning to New York she made friends with many young artists. In 1961, she met and married sculptor Tom Doyle. In August 1962 Eva Hesse and Tom Doyle participated in an Allan Kaprow Happening at the Art Students League of New York in Woodstock, New York. There Hesse made her first three dimensional piece: a costume for the Happening. In 1963 Eva Hesse had a one-person show of works on paper at the Allan Stone Gallery on New York's Upper East Side.
The couple lived and worked in an abandoned textile mill in the Ruhr region of Germany for about a year during 1964-1965. Hesse was not happy to be back in Germany, but began sculpting with materials that had been left behind in the abandoned factory: first relief sculptures made of cloth-covered cord, electrical wire, and masonite, with playful titles like Eighter from Decatur and Oomamaboomba. Returning to New York City in 1965 she began working in the materials that would become characteristic of her work: latex, fiberglass, and plastics. Eva Hesse had also an interest in drawing as evinced by her numerous workbooks.
She was associated with the mid-1960s postminimal anti-form trend in sculpture, participating in New York exhibits such as "Eccentric Abstraction" and "Abstract Inflationism and Stuffed Expressionism" (both 1966). In September 1968 Eva Hesse began teaching at the School of Visual Arts. Her only one-person show of sculpture in her lifetime was "Chain Polymers" at the Fischbach Gallery on W. 57th Street in New York in November 1968; her large piece Expanded Expansion showed at the Whitney Museum in the 1969 exhibit "Anti-Illusion: Process/Materials". There have been dozens of major posthumous exhibitions in the United States and Europe, including at The Guggenheim Museum (1972), the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2002), The Drawing Center in New York (2006) and the Jewish Museum of New York (2006).

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Artissima 2013 - From Philospher's stone to tomato crops - we make money not art

Artissima 2013 - From Philospher's stone to tomato crops - we make money not art | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

An art fair is not the best place to discover works related to science, technology or politics. And when there are indeed such works on offer, they are not easy to spot. Galleries exhibiting at art fairs don't usually accompany the artwork with a text explaining what the piece is about. In fact, several galleries don't even write down the name of the artists they exhibit. You have to go and ask them. Which i do when i'm desperate but most of the time, i just want to keep on walking from gallery to gallery (there were 172 of them this year at Artissima) and see the rest of the show before my head explodes.

I did however, spot a few gems at the latest edition of Artissima.

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Sculpture: Berlinde De Bruyckere Interview at ACCA, We are all Flesh 2012

Berlinde De Bruyckere in conversation at her exhibition 'We are all Flesh' at The Australian Centre for Contemporary Art. Berlinde explains her use of the AC...
Xaos's insight:

Berlinde De Bruyckere uses wax, wood, wool, horse skin and hair to make haunting sculptures of humans, animals and trees in metamorphosis.

We are all Flesh will include the rarely seen and iconic work 019 and two new commissions created specially for this exhibition.

Based in her home town of Ghent, Berlinde De Bruyckere's studio is an old neo-Gothic Catholic school house. From here she creates her incredible sculptures - torsos morph into branches, trees are captured and displayed inside old museum cabinets and cast horses are crucified upside down in works that have been described as brutal, challenging, inspiring and both frightening and comforting.

Heavily influenced by the old masters, De Bruyckere's early years at boarding school were spent hiding in the library, pouring over books on the history of catholic art. She went on to study at the Saint-Lucas Visual Arts School in Ghent, and was known in the early stages of her career for using old woolen blankets in her works, sometimes simply stacked on tables of beds, a response to news footage she had seen of blanket-swathed refugees in Rwanda.

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Damián Ortega Artists | White Cube

Damián Ortega Artists | White Cube | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Damián Ortega was born in 1967 in Mexico City and currently lives and works in Berlin, Germany.
Xaos's insight:

Damián Ortega’s work explores specific economic, aesthetic and cultural situations and in particular how regional culture affects commodity consumption.

He began his career as a political cartoonist and his art has the intellectual rigour and sense of playfulness often associated with his previous occupation. He creates sculptures, installations, videos and actions inspired by a wide range of mundane objects, from golf balls and pick-axes to bricks, rubbish bins and even tortillas, all subjected to what has been described as Ortega’s characteristically “mischievous process of transformation and dysfunction”. In Cosmic Thing (2002), one of his most celebrated works, Ortega disassembled a Volkswagen Beetle car and re-composed it piece by piece, suspended from wire in mid-air, in the manner of a mechanic’s instruction manual. The result was both a diagram and a fragmented object that offered a new way of seeing the “people’s car” first developed in Nazi Germany but now produced en masse in his native Mexico. In Spirit (2005), Ortega constructed a series of architectural spaces using recycled materials which, when viewed from above, spelt out the letters of the work’s title, playing with the idea of optical and physical illusion.

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If We Had To Ask For Permission, We Wouldn’t Exist: A Brief History of UbuWeb 1996 -The Present

If We Had To Ask For Permission, We Wouldn’t Exist: A Brief History of UbuWeb 1996 -The Present | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Join us for an evening with Kenneth Goldsmith as he performs his poetry and looks back on the history of UbuWeb, offering us a glimpse of its treasures.
Xaos's insight:

At the dawn of the Internet age (1996), conceptual poet and performer Kenneth Goldsmith created UbuWeb, an online archive that has become, as he writes, the “definitive source for all things avant-garde on the internet.” An initial interest in visual and concrete poetry expanded to include sound and music, film, and literature. Archival formats changed as technology evolved from early scans to audio streaming to a current repository of over 2,500 full length films and videos with over 7,000 artists represented. On today’s UbuWeb, editors oversee collections from specific disciplines, universities donate bandwidth, and Goldsmith and his allies continue to fend off accusations of copyright infringement. Fifteen years later, UbuWeb maintains its fiercely independent, generous, yet precarious spirit. Join us for an evening with Kenneth Goldsmith as he performs his poetry and looks back on the history of UbuWeb, offering us a glimpse of its treasures.

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Frieze Magazine | Archive | Le Goût des Autres

Frieze Magazine | Archive | Le Goût des Autres | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

Le Goût des Autres

The ‘man of taste’ is an invention of the 17th century. His quest, so the earliest theorists seem to agree, is for an aesthetic mean: a fine line between nature and artifice. Jean de La Bruyère, in his Characters (1688), writes that ‘there is in art a point of perfection, as there is in Nature one of goodness and completeness. Anyone who feels this and loves it possesses a perfect taste; but he who is not sensible of it, and loves what is short of that point or beyond it, is wanting in taste.’ The Earl of Shaftesbury, in 1712, refines the point: taste subsists between crudeness and pedantry, naivety and self-consciousness. Our untutored affects must be worked up into mature judgements: ‘the great business in this is to correct our taste. For whither will not taste lead us?’ But excessive learning is perhaps the true enemy of good taste: an ‘artificial, witty, far-fetched, refined, hypercritical taste […] is the worst in the world’.

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VIDEO: Chinese Artist Cui Fei Traces Her Philosophical Sand-Paintings at MAD | Artinfo

VIDEO: Chinese Artist Cui Fei Traces Her Philosophical Sand-Paintings at MAD  | Artinfo | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
ARTINFO talks with the artist and curator David McFadden about "Tracing the Origins 8," a calligraphic meditation on humanity and nature.
Xaos's insight:

Beauty often goes hand-in-hand with impermanence. New York-based Chinese artist Cui Fei takes this to an extreme with her current project for the Museum of Arts and Design’s exhibition “Swept Away: Dust, Ashes, and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design.” For the show, which explores the artistic possibilities of the titular materials, Cui has created "Tracing the Origins VIII," a series of sand paintings using a technique familiar from Tibetan colored sand mandalas. The artist uses black sand to draw out a series of abstracted shapes that reference graceful calligraphy and the splintering, organic forms of tree branches in equal measure. Cui uses Chinese characters "as a way to explore the relationship between human beings and nature," she explains.

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Yin Xiuzhen - Groninger Museum

Yin Xiuzhen - Groninger Museum | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
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Yin Xiuzhen (1963) is one of the most prominent artists of her generation. Especially for this exhibition, Yin made a cityscape of Groningen, called "Portable City", which is composed of clothes worn by citizens of Groningen.

In addition to recent work, the presentation also contains key works such as Collective Subconscious (2007), Thought (2009) and Waves (2009-2010). The Weapon installation (2003-2007) will also be on display. This consists of twenty horizontally suspended spear-shaped objects that seem to fly as darts toward their target. This installation was purchased in 2008 and was exhibited during the Biennial in Venice in 2007.

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#A.I.L / artists in laboratories, episode 15: Ollie Palmer - we make money not art

#A.I.L / artists in laboratories, episode 15: Ollie Palmer - we make money not art | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

This week i'm talking with Ollie Palmer is a designer, artist, a tutor at Bartlett but he is also the guy who's so interested in dancing insects that he's embarked on a 6 year project to choreograph and stage an Ant Ballet.

Developed with the support of scientists from University College London and the Institute of Zoology in London, the work uses a robotic arm which sprays synthesized pheromone in artificial trails that the ants will follow in preference to their own natural foraging behaviour. The project will grow over several phases and one of them involves the creation of intercontinental ant telecommunication devices.

During the interview, Ollie talks ants and more precisely Argentine ants, a particularly invasive species that the UK wants nowhere near its shores. We also learn about the best way to collect ants, to synthesize pheromones and end the show with a few words about the Godot Machine, a device built for the sole purpose of preventing a single ant to move around.

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TateShots: Do Ho Suh -- Staircase-III

A gauzy red staircase floats high up in a gallery at Tate Modern, in this installation by artist Do Ho Suh. Watching as the team pinned the fabric in place, ...
Xaos's insight:

Do-Ho Suh was born in Seoul, Korea, in 1962. After earning his BFA and MFA in Oriental Painting from Seoul National University, and fulfilling his term of mandatory service in the South Korean military, Suh relocated to the United States to continue his studies at the Rhode Island School of Design and Yale University. Best known for his intricate sculptures that defy conventional notions of scale and site-specificity, Suh draws attention to the ways viewers occupy and inhabit public space...

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Anti-Utopias | Lorenzo Oggiano – Polimorphic Systems Studies

Anti-Utopias | Lorenzo Oggiano – Polimorphic Systems Studies | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

“Polymorphism is the state of being made of many different elements, forms, kinds or individuals. In biology it refers to the occurrence of different forms, stages or types in individual organisms or in organisms of the same species.” (Michael Hensel)

Polymorphic Systems Studies is a series of 12 photo-realistic 3d studies that aims to explore and visualize polymorphic synth-organisms / bio-tools / bio-machines. The project expands and enhances an image series produced by the artist for Viewpoint magazine (Metropolitan Publishing BV / Amsterdam, Bianca Wendt Studio / London).

The edition is of 3+1 A.P. (2 38×57 cm – 1 56×84 cm). All the artworks are printed using pigment-based inks on archival paper.

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Return to the Limitless

Documentaire sur l'artiste Sud Coréenne Cha Jong-Rye, 2011. Documentary about South Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye, 2011.
Xaos's insight:

Cha Jongrye was born in Daejeon, Korea, a historic province now known as the silicon valley of Korea, but whose name translates to “large field,” harkening back to its simple, organic roots. Those roots in the simplicity of nature are the basis for Jongrye’s monumental works which seem to defy the confines of space and the natural world.

Cha Jongrye works with wood, but not in the way we’re used to. She challenges the material to do more than replicate the frozen recollection of a person, place or thing. Making wood fluid, she reminds the observer of its moment of creation, the organic process before the wood was firmed and placed in the world.

Cha’s works has an earthy sensuality that only hints at the possibly deeper meaning. The surface is a technically masterful manipulation of material; layering delicate wood pieces and sanding them by hand, fusing and grinding wooden slivers, Cha meticulously fits together topographical contours that have no beginning or end.

Cha calls on the ideas of creation, infinity and eternity. The cone shape that is prevalent in her work references birth in nature where a pointed tip bursts through the earth’s surface and continues to reach upward as it grows. It is also a metaphor for the human egoic experience of continually reaching to create more and more, greater and greater as we cement our place in the universe.

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Eva Hesse Biography, Art, and Analysis of Works | The Art Story

Eva Hesse Biography, Art, and Analysis of Works | The Art Story | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Artworks and analysis: Eva Hesse worked with simple materials to suggest a wide range of organic associations, psychological moods, and sexual themes.
Xaos's insight:

Eva Hesse is one of the most renowned American artists to come of age in the immediate aftermath of The Abstract Expressionists. Having fled her native Germany during the rise of Nazism, Hesse was originally schooled in American abstract painting and commercial design practices. She originally pursued a career in commercial textile design in New York City, but Hesse's practice as an expressionist painter led her to increasingly experiment with industrial and every-day, or "found" materials, such as rope, string, wire, rubber, and fiberglass. Reducing her means in the spirit of Minimalism, Hesse explored by way of the simplest materials how to suggest a wide range of organic associations, psychological moods, and what might be called proto-feminist, sexual innuendo. She also experimented with expressing semi-whimsical states of mind rarely explored in the modern era until her all-too-brief debut. Thus Hesse arrived quickly at a new kind of abstract painting, as well as a kind of so-called "eccentric," freestanding sculpture.

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Flavorpill’s 10 Most Anticipated Art Exhibits of 2013

Flavorpill’s 10 Most Anticipated Art Exhibits of 2013 | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Are you ready for a year of new art exhibitions? Whether you’re itching to revisit old favorites or ready to embrace brave new frontiers, we’ve got a selection of exciting art shows tha...
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e you ready for a year of new art exhibitions? Whether you’re itching to revisit old favorites or ready to embrace brave new frontiers, we’ve got a selection of exciting art shows that love to break the rules. From cutting-edge new media exhibits to shows celebrating an avant-garde departure from mainstream culture in a decade past, get ready to be inspired. Is the New Aesthetic the new Surrealism? Take a peek at 2013 and mark your calendars!

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The Commons as a Model for Art

The Commons as a Model for Art | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

Open Field offers us an unusual opportunity?—?to throw light on, and perhaps even to resolve for a time?—?the contentious and vexing relationship between what we think of as “art” and what we call “craft,” “social practice,” “maker culture” and yes, “political activity.”

As civic actors, artists have been notoriously unsuccessful at causing social change on a macro level. While we’ve collectively helped to construct one of the most culturally exciting periods in recent history, we’ve had no success halting militarism, reversing accelerating economic inequalities, or grafting our values and ideas onto a working political framework. I believe we’ve experienced these chronic failures traumatically, and we’ve adapted by reconfiguring our senses of ourselves and our work to focus on smaller, more autonomous, and more achievable outcomes.

On a micro level, we’ve been much more successful, and our victories come in many flavors. We’ve taken performance into public spaces, invented new objects, planted vegetables, floated conceptual projects, sketched out utopias, and called attention to conditions that must change. This and more constitute the labor of twenty-first-century artists. We work, however, in a staccato manner: we conceive projects, we fund (or don’t fund) them, perform them, evaluate them, possibly hand them over to the community, and then?—?we move on. Admittedly, there are exceptions, but most often we behave like serial monogamists, living as fully as we can within a moment until the next moment arrives. Our social practice is almost always short-term. We don’t run community organizations; we don’t build permanent workshops for makers; we do propose concepts, but we generally aren’t bound by the consequences of our propositions. None of this is necessarily bad; in fact, it’s quite traditional. While we work in constantly changing environments and newly emerging media forms, our social function remains much the same. And as long as these conditions prevail, Open Field will be a playground, a temporary (and not terribly autonomous) zone, incubating crops that die in the autumn and sprout again in spring.

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How Many Nude Bodies Can You Count?

How Many Nude Bodies Can You Count? | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
By David Rosenberg Photographer Shinichi Maruyama’s new work, NUDE, uses cutting-edge technology to create elaborate images from simple origins: the naked human body.
Xaos's insight:

Photographer Shinichi Maruyama’s new work, NUDE, uses cutting-edge technology to create elaborate images from simple origins: the naked human body.

Maruyama collaborated with choreographer Jessica Lang on the series, which involved testing several dancers doing specific routines before pairing up the dancers with picture-perfect movement.

In the past, Maruyama, who was introduced to photography by an elementary-school teacher, has done a lot of work capturing motion, mostly with water.

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Death: A Self-portrait - we make money not art

Death: A Self-portrait - we make money not art | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

Exhibitions at the Wellcome Collection are always eventful. I've seen sliced brain, freeze-dried brain, dessicated brain, two wax babies heads dissected, tin face masks for WWI soldiers disfigured by explosions and gunshot, i've learnt about the history of narcotics, read about a gentleman turned on by dirty maids, etc. Wellcome's exhibitions are dramatic and engaging but they are also impeccably researched and edifying. I can't remember having exited one of their shows without being fascinated by the amount of information their curators manage to pack in each room. Except this time.

The recently opened exhibition Death: A Self-portrait is entertaining, it contains some fantastic pieces and it definitely deserves a trip to the Euston Road museum but it is a bit light in reflection and cross-disciplinary references compared to what Wellcome has used me to. The show displays some 300 works -most of them being skulls- from Richard Harris's collection of cultural artefacts, artworks and scientific specimens devoted to the iconography of death and our complex and contradictory attitudes towards it.

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Download Hundreds of Free Art Catalogs from The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Download Hundreds of Free Art Catalogs from The Metropolitan Museum of Art | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, the Guggenheim Museum put online 65 modern art books, giving you free access to books introducing the work of Alexander Calder, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, Gustav Klimt & Egon Schiele, and Kandinsky. Now, just a few short months...
Xaos's insight:

Of the many resources you can explore, here’s one obvious highlight: MetPublications now makes available 370 out-of-print titles, including lots of informative and visually-packed art catalogs from the museum’s past exhibitions. You can read the books online or download them in PDF format (although I should warn you that the PDF downloads take some time, so be patient). When you rummage around, you’ll come across works like these and more:

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MoMA’s Show of Shows: “Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925”

MoMA’s Show of Shows: “Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925” | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Inventing Abstraction, 1910-1925, the new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, should be the kind of show that MoMA was made for, and it is.
Like last year’s de Kooning: A Retrospective (whic...
Xaos's insight:

the new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, should be the kind of show that MoMA was made for, and it is.

Like last year’s de Kooning: A Retrospective (which could have been subtitled Deconstructing Abstraction), the new show draws on the museum’s finest tradition of world-class scholarship presented in visually stunning terms.

Organized by Leah Dickerman, Curator, with Masha Chlenova, Curatorial Assistant, of the Department of Painting and Sculpture, the exhibition delves deeply into the historical period, bringing forth unknown, ravishing works while casting familiar ones in a startling new light.

To begin at the beginning: one of the show’s biggest surprises is the realization that, here in the House That Pablo Built, the three modest Picassos we encounter at the entranceway — two small drawings from MoMA’s collection and an Analytical Cubist oil on canvas borrowed from the Museum Ludwig in Cologne — are the only ones in the show.

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Prague | poetic interventions by Korean artists in Czech sanctuaries | culture360.org

Prague | poetic interventions by Korean artists in Czech sanctuaries | culture360.org | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
As part of the TINA B Prague Contemporary Art Festival this autumn, a special collaborative project 우리[WOO:RI] took place, with poetic intervention installations by Korean contemporary artists in prominent religious sanctuaries in the Czech Republic.
Xaos's insight:

The concept of this project titled ‘우리 [WOO:RI]’ is a Korean word meaning ‘we/our/us’ in English. Here it is considered a metaphor for interhuman spheres which consists of relationships between people, societies, communities, individuals, and cultures. However, the concept behind this word implies more than what they literally meant in the Korean socio-cultural environment. Like a double-edged sword, it contains a strong sense of the social cohesion within the same circle of group consciousness. However, it can also show some sense of exclusionism and prejudice which alienates others who don’t belong to the sense of inclusion.

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David Altmejd at Modern Art, London / MOUSSE CONTEMPORARY ART MAGAZINE

David Altmejd at Modern Art, London / MOUSSE CONTEMPORARY ART MAGAZINE | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
MOUSSE CONTEMPORARY ART MAGAZIN.
Xaos's insight:

David Altmejd’s work iterates fantastical ideas of spirited bodies. He taps into languages abstracted from architecture, ornament, and naturalistic figuration in the making of sculptures which are, for the artist, whole worlds in which he can lose himself in imaginative fantasises of making and open-ended storytelling.

 

For this exhibition at Modern Art, Altmejd presents three large sculptures, each solely occupying a room within the gallery. The boxed and vitrine-like clear Perspex structures of these sculptures provide support for complex arrangements of symbolic objects and suggestive forms: arrested flows of liquid, coconut shells, silver chains and coloured threads. Creatures of myth and fantasy inhabit the world of Altmejd’s entire oeuvre, and in his new sculptures these bodies have been entirely abstracted into a representation of biological systems, energy-flows and spirits that inhabit architectural dioramas. Altmejd’s approach to making is intuitive and inquisitive, an application of active sculpting in form and narrative that almost pretends to an idea of creation and intelligent design.

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Anti-Utopias | Anouk Wipprecht – DareDroid 2.0

Anti-Utopias | Anouk Wipprecht – DareDroid 2.0 | The Aesthetic Ground | Scoop.it
Xaos's insight:

The DareDroid is a biomechanic cocktail making dress that uses medical technology, customized hardware and human temperament to provide you with a freshly made cocktail. The human host and robotic dress work together to provide you with a cocktail in exchange for a game of “Truth or Dare”. The robotic performance playfully transgresses and explores human interaction in public spaces and inverts the normal social experience by asking people to reveal personal information.

Sensors around the model’s neck detect your presence and allows the technological system to dispense non-alcoholic liquid. Your willingness to play a touch screen based game of Truth or Dare, combined with your natural charm triggers the decision to give you more than just juice. LED’s on the robotic dress indicates your proximity to the human host, and if you breach her intimate space the system shuts down. Play the game, and be rewarded.

The Modern Nomads (MoNo) – the team behind DareDroid – is comprised of a hacker, a fashion designer, and a sculptor. Anouk Wipprecht is a Dutch fashion-tech designer who uses electronics in her designs. Marius Kintel is a hacker, tinkerer, and engineer based in Vienna and at the Metalab. Jane Tingley is a Montreal based artist who works with sculpture, responsive installation, and sound.

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