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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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An Amazing Timeline Chronicling The History of Social Media

An Amazing Timeline Chronicling The History of Social Media | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Emma Stutzman's curator insight, January 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This picture shows how social media has developed over the years. It mentions how many people thought that social media was started with facebook, when in reality it was really started by other projects that you can see above. This picture/concept shows the differences between which sites took off and which didn't, depending on our cultural preferences.

Mhd.Shadi Khudr's curator insight, January 15, 2014 12:05 PM


Many thanks to Roula Haj-Ismail:

@roula haj-ismail

 

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, February 28, 2014 9:08 AM

  YES infographie : synthèse social média.

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Googling Yourself Takes on a Whole New Meaning ~ NY Times Magazine

Googling Yourself Takes on a Whole New Meaning ~ NY Times Magazine | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Clive Thompson


"Google Glass is the company’s attempt to mainstream what the tech industry calls wearable computing, to take the computer off your desk or out of your pocket and keep it in your field of view. In a world where we’re already peering at screens all day long, pecked at by alerts, the prospect of an eyeball computer can provoke a shudder. But over several weeks of using the device myself, I began to experience some of the intriguing — and occasionally delightful — aspects of this new machine. I got used to glancing up to start texting and e-mailing by addressing its surprisingly accurate voice-transcription capabilities. (I admit I once texted my wife while riding my bicycle.) I set up calendar reminders that dinged in my ear. I used an app that guided me back to my car in a parking lot. I sent pictures of magazine articles to Evernote, so I would have reminders of what I’d read. I had tweets from friends float across my gaze.


"Despite my quick adoption, however, only rarely did I accomplish something with Glass that I couldn’t already do with, say, my mobile phone. When I first heard about the device, I envisioned using it as a next-level brain supplement, accessing brilliant trivia during conversations, making myself seem omniscient (or insufferable, or both). This happened only occasionally: I startled a friend with information about the author of a rare sci-fi book, for example. But generally I found that Googling was pretty hard; you mostly control Glass with voice commands, and speaking queries aloud in front of others was awkward."

Jim Lerman's insight:

An interesting journalistic meditation on the history and applications of Google Glass in its current state, perhaps 6 months before its general release to the public. Thompson was one of 8,000 people who were able to purchase a pre-release model for $1500.

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MIT Media Lab, d.school Point the Way Toward Decentralized, Networked Learning | Mediashift | PBS

MIT Media Lab, d.school Point the Way Toward Decentralized, Networked Learning | Mediashift | PBS | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Aran Levasseur

 

TECHNOLOGY ISN’T ENOUGH

 

"In education, digital technology and 21st century learning have become quite fashionable. Schools that have the resources to integrate digital tools are eager to do so. But digital tools are only the beginning. They are intimations of greater changes to come. It will be the novel and creative ways that people interact using technology that will generate the innovation all sectors of our society are looking for. If flattening hierarchies and decentralizing control are previews of coming attractions, then what does that mean for education?

 

"Let’s start with the classroom. Flattening hierarchies and decentralizing control would increase autonomy and augment network interaction. A flattened hierarchy would transform the teacher from an omnipotent silo of knowledge to more of a designer, coach and guide. This would enable greater autonomy for students to pursue what intrinsically motivates them within an environment shaped by design thinking and under the guidance of a teacher. Greater network interaction would emphasize collaboration versus individual achievement. With an Internet connection via a smartphone, tablet or laptop, a learning network would be rooted in the local environment but limited only by one’s imagination. Integral to this structural shift is the collapse of departmental walls and cultivation of multidisciplinary thinking. This is not your father’s or mother’s school. But it is the kind of learning your can find at two of the world’s premier universities: MIT and Stanford."

Jim Lerman's insight:

A penetrating essay that traces the growth of human social organization through the impacts made by developing technologies, a view that i favor.

Well worth reading and thinking about.

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decentralisedteaching's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:56 AM

Interesting article on how some of the top universities  in the US (Stanford, MIT) are pushing Decentralised, Networked Learning!

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100 Diagrams That Changed the World

100 Diagrams That Changed the World | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web.


Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even decorate abstract concepts like consciousness and love.

100 Diagrams That Changed the World by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.

But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinational, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines.


Via Lauren Moss
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, December 29, 2012 3:20 PM

So often when we understand a concept or the relationship of big ideas, we say "I see!" .  Infographics help us see, and be seeing help us think.  This collection of diagrams have impacted the world we live in.  Take a look, perhaps you'll see...

Patrizia Bertini's curator insight, December 30, 2012 5:59 AM

I see! - goes together with embodied cognition? It seems so... Infographics as a key?

bancoideas's curator insight, December 30, 2012 9:28 AM

Ideas acerca de las ideas que tenemos sobte nosotros/as mismos/as y el mundo que co-construimos

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Origins of Common UI Symbols | Visual.ly

Origins of Common UI Symbols | Visual.ly | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

They are road signs for your daily rituals—the instantly recognized symbols and icons you press, click and ogle countless times a day when you interact with your computer. But how much do you know about their origins?


Via Lauren Moss
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Search 80,0000 Media History Digital Library Artifacts ~ Free Technology for Teachers

Search 80,0000 Media History Digital Library Artifacts ~ Free Technology for Teachers | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Richard Byrne

 

"The Media History Digital Library is a massive archive of documents about the history film, television, and radio. The library can now be searched and the documents viewed online through MHDL's new site called the Lantern. On Lantern you will find reviews and critiques of movies, books and playbills, many periodicals about the movie, television, and radio industries. Your search can be refined according to date, language, and publication type. You can also browse through collections curated by MHDL.

Applications for Education

"Two thoughts came to mind as I browsed through MHDL's Lantern. First, it's obviously an excellent resource for students studying the history and development of media. Second, through MHDL's Lantern you could find some good examples of how to write a critique. Your students could use those as models for writing their own critiques of movies or even of books."

 

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Tricia Adams's curator insight, August 29, 2013 7:49 AM

What an amazing resource - and you can search within individual issues of film magazines - I shall be using this for lots of personal research on old films...

Margaret Waage's curator insight, August 29, 2013 10:50 AM

Back to school - great resource - thank you!!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 1, 2013 1:55 PM

Without words... excellent applications for education in particular for students of history and development of media.

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ChronoZoom - Bridging the Gap between Humanities & the Sciences

ChronoZoom - Bridging the Gap between Humanities & the Sciences | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"ChronoZoom is an open source community project dedicated to visualizing the history of everything to bridge the gap between the humanities and sciences using the story of Big History to easily understand all this information. This project has been funded and supported by Microsoft Research Connections in collaboration with University California at Berkeley and Moscow State University.

You can browse through history on ChronoZoom to find data in the form of articles, images, video, sound, and other multimedia. ChronoZoom links a wealth of information from five major regimes that unifies all historical knowledge collectively known as Big History."

An overwhelming amount of information in one location...this will take time to explore!


Via Beth Dichter, Smithstorian
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