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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design

The Best Infographics of the Year: Nate Silver on the 3 Keys to Great Information Design | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The second installment of The Best American Infographics 2014 (public library) has an introduction by master-statistician Nate Silver and fifty-eight examples of stellar information design shedding light on such diverse topics as the history of space exploration, the sleep habits of famous writers, the geography of where gay people stay in the closet, the comparative shapes and sizes of major baseball parks, and the social network of jazz musicians in the 1920s. 

Silver, the author of The Signal and the Noise, considers the two factors that make an infographic compelling — providing a window into its creator’s mind and telling a story that “couldn’t be told in any other way.


Via Lauren Moss
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Marco Favero's curator insight, October 21, 2014 6:14 PM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from The Humanitarian
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ChronoZoom - Bridging the Gap between Humanities & the Sciences

ChronoZoom - Bridging the Gap between Humanities & the Sciences | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"ChronoZoom is an open source community project dedicated to visualizing the history of everything to bridge the gap between the humanities and sciences using the story of Big History to easily understand all this information. This project has been funded and supported by Microsoft Research Connections in collaboration with University California at Berkeley and Moscow State University.

You can browse through history on ChronoZoom to find data in the form of articles, images, video, sound, and other multimedia. ChronoZoom links a wealth of information from five major regimes that unifies all historical knowledge collectively known as Big History."

An overwhelming amount of information in one location...this will take time to explore!


Via Beth Dichter, Smithstorian
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Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Storytelling: The Next Step for Visualization

Storytelling: The Next Step for Visualization | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Robert Korsara

 

"Presentation and communication of data have so far played a minor role in visualization research, with most work focused on exploration and analysis. We propose that presentation, in particular using elements from storytelling, is the next logical step and should be a research focus of at least equal importance as each of the other two. Stories package information into a structure that is easily remembered, which is important in many collaborative scenarios when an analyst is not the same person as the one who makes decisions, or simply needs to share information with peers. Data visualization lends itself well to being a communication medium for storytelling, in particular when the story also contains a lot of data. We review the literature on storytelling and presentation and outline the research area. "


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:48 PM

Here's the next stop on the data and visual storytelling journey. While the previous article I curated focused on the history of visual storytelling, this research article addresses 'what's next.'


For the authors of the article -- what's next is the presentation and communication of data that has played only a minor role in research up to this point.


Click on the title of the article "Storytelling: The Next Step for Visualization" at the bottom of the blurb to get a free copy of the research paper. 


The research paper itself focuses on journalism as storytelling -- which it is, but it is not the only method or approach. So the article is limiting in that way. 


Still, there are some good insights about how data visualization needs to move more directly into storytelling using story delivery techniques.


Iin the end, the authors Robert Kosara and Jock Mackinlay say: 

"Storytelling promises to open up entirely new avenues of research in visualization. Going from exploration to analysis to presentation is a natural progression, which is mirrored by the research effort focused on these steps over time. As the field becomes more mature and provides many useful techniques for the first two steps, we need to start focusing on presentation. This is even more important as visualization gets used for decision-making, where the succinct presentation of important facts is crucial."


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED

The Urban Observatory: A New Way To Compare Cities, From The Creator Of TED | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
This giant installation and a website you can play with at home lets you compare the worlds urban centers side by side.

We live in a world of easily accessible maps; however, our map knowledge is limited by the fact that no two cities collect data the same way. Maps often aren’t drawn to the same scale, and until now, there hasn’t been a way to compare data on things like income, cost of living, water distribution, and power grids.

It’s a problem that has bugged Richard Saul Wurman, the creator of the TED conference (as well as an architect and graphic designer), for decades.

Wurman recently teamed up with Jon Kamen of Radical Media and Esri president Jack Dangermond to create an ambitious solution: the Urban Observatory, an immersive exhibit featuring standardized comparative data on over 16 cities. Zoom in on one city map and other cities will simultaneously zoom in at the same scale, making it possible to compare data on traffic density, vegetation, residential land use, and so on.

 

Find more details and information at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
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Infographic: Hackers Create An Amazing, Illegal Portrait Of The Internet

Infographic: Hackers Create An Amazing, Illegal Portrait Of The Internet | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

It wasn’t malicious. The file itself was the size of a small JPEG. It was given the absolute lowest priority. And it was set to self-destruct if anything went wrong. But this small file allowed one single hacker to measure the Internet activity of nearly half a million connected devices around the world, then share the results with everyone.

How was this even possible? The "hacker" barely hacked anything. In reality, they gained access to all these systems because each had the default "root" set as a password. With this access in hand, they ran several tests focusing on Internet structure and activity. And what they created from all this data is a spectacular map that captures a day in the life of the Internet (and all of its users).


Via Lauren Moss
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, May 11, 2013 3:17 AM
Wonderful
Nacho Vega's curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:18 PM

Creative power: hacking at the end of the world!

 

Using "root" as universal key :))

Kristin Newton's curator insight, May 11, 2013 10:10 PM

The Internet is connecting us day by day in amazing ways.

Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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A Brief History of Information Design and Visual Storytelling

Humankind has been telling complex stories through simple visuals long before you saw your first infographic at Mashable. History is humbling, let's go back in

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:24 PM

If you are into data and storytelling, then this brief overview is for you. The slideshare program quickly explains data visualization through time.


Of course, how data is displayed -- if done well -- can tell its own story.  The next step is to give a presentation as a story, and tell the story of the data as you are doing so. 


Until then, enjoy this quick historical review of visual storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it