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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Ed. Schools Lag Behind Digital Content Trends | Education Week

Ed. Schools Lag Behind Digital Content Trends | Education Week | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Amanda M. Fairbanks

 

"James G. Cibulka, the president of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which currently accredits 670 colleges of education, sees a range of offerings when it comes to education schools keeping up with advancements in technology.

 

"Mr. Cibulka cautioned that NCATE only accredits fewer than half of the national providers. The issue is further complicated by the fact that accreditation is a voluntary process, with some states requiring it for licensure while others can opt out. Based on NCATE's subset, he described offerings as "all over the place," and called it "a matter of great concern."

 

"In future years, the organization is planning to put in place a new set of five accreditation standards, in which technology is woven throughout each requirement. The aim is to provide more symmetry and quality in preparing teachers to use digital curricula.

 

"And with schools coming up for accreditation once every seven years, Mr. Cibulka didn't mince words: "There will be no way for schools to meet the new standards unless technology is infused throughout their program."

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David Foster Wallace’s Timeless Graduation Speech on the Meaning of Life, Adapted in a Short Film

David Foster Wallace’s Timeless Graduation Speech on the Meaning of Life, Adapted in a Short Film | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Maria Popova

 

"On May 21, 2005, David Foster Wallace got up before the graduating class of Kenyon college and delivered one of history’s most memorable commencement addresses. It wasn’t until Wallace’s death in 2008 that the speech took on a life of its own under the title This Is Water, and was even adapted into a short book. Now, the fine folks of The Glossary have remixed an abridged version of Wallace’s original audio with a sequence of aptly chosen images to give one pause:"

 

Wallace: “The real value of a real education … has almost nothing to do with knowledge and everything to do with simple awareness.”

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 17, 2013 4:22 PM

Self-Awareness and Mindfulness.  Two pillars to smart decisions about what environments you invest in (education, knowledge), choose now and for the near future.  ~  Deb

Becky Poisson's curator insight, May 20, 2013 12:07 PM

Not banal at all.  Always good to get a different perspective.

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Voice of the Graduate | McKinsey & Co.

Jim Lerman's insight:

From the introduction

 

"There’s a paradox facing American society today. The demonstrable economic benefit of investing in higher education has never been greater. Research in the United States shows an enduring positive impact on earnings directly associated with the level of postsecondary learning a person attains. And research from around the world shows a link between college education and levels of individual and national well-being more broadly.

 

"Yet at the same time, as the survey discussed in this report will show, this potential does not appear to be fully realized in the lived experience of many recent graduates.The gap between higher education’s undeniable value and the concerns many recent graduates nonetheless report should become the impetus for change. In a sense, the “voice of the graduate” revealed in this survey amounts to a cry for help—an urgent call to deepen the relevance of higher education to employment and entrepreneurship so that the promise of higher education is fulfilled.

"By focusing on the voice of America’s young people, this report, by design, raises more questions than it answers. Our hope is that the underappreciated student perspective can serve as a fresh spur to a conversation that seems overdue.

 

"As every thoughtful observer recognizes, the improvements today’s graduates are calling for cannot be pursued by any education stakeholder working alone. Instead, as McKinsey’s work around the world on its “education to employment” initiative suggests, it is only when employers,education providers, public officials, families, and youth advocates work together that effective solutions can be forged."

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Digital Publishing for Filmmakers: The Karada and The Silent History [#Transmedia]

Digital Publishing for Filmmakers: The Karada and The Silent History [#Transmedia] | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Randy Astle:  "Transmedia by definition requires producers to work in more than one medium; the fun, most of the time, is in devising ways to carry a narrative (or narrative world) across different platforms" ...


Via The Digital Rocking Chair, Deborah Arnold, Jim Lerman
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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, March 5, 2013 2:16 AM

Interesting - Click the headline for the full story.

Joakim Baage's curator insight, March 5, 2013 10:55 AM

The book business need this kind of thinking

Debbie Elicksen 's curator insight, March 5, 2013 11:43 AM

The future is now

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iPhone 2: Intermediate (iOS6)

iPhone 2: Intermediate (iOS6) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Do you want to get more out of your iPhone? Check out the second part of our in-depth guide to Apple’s premier phone. The second of a three part series from author Tim Brookes, this 12-lesson guide outlines everything from the camera to the App Store. Lesson-by-lesson, we’ll take you through your phone’s many functions, from the very basics to more advanced operations and features you might not have even been aware of.

 

"The iPhone is a revolutionary device thanks to its user-friendly interface and sleek minimalist design – but that doesn’t mean it’s always straightforward. Many of the iPhone’s advanced or lesser-used features are hidden away and Apple don’t always do the greatest job of filling you in."

Jim Lerman's insight:

The guides produced by makeuseof are consistently helpful and well done.

 

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Essay on community colleges and MOOCs | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on community colleges and MOOCs | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By J. Noah Brown

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"Do MOOCs represent a panacea for community colleges? Data from the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College, Columbia University offer a cautionary tale about traditional online courses now being used at community colleges.The result of a longitudinal study of students in the Washington Community and Technical Colleges dating back to 2004, the CCRC study raises serious questions about the efficacy of online learning — and by implication, MOOCs — for community college students."

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What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Apres, Ken Morrison
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Victoria Collins's curator insight, May 13, 2013 7:38 AM

What an insightful graphic! So true.

Tracy Hanson's curator insight, May 13, 2013 9:30 AM

It is the foundation of NGGE.

Dr. Steven F. Simmons's curator insight, May 18, 2013 1:16 PM

To thrive in the 21st Century Knolwedge Economy, people must embrace self-directed learning.

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Online Education in Higher Education Whitepaper | University Ventures

Jim Lerman's insight:

This is the most trenchant and meaningful exploration of online education in the MOOC era that I have encountered. If you have an interest in where higher education is headed in the near future, this is required reading.

 

"MOOCs have already made two key contributions to higher education. The first is that it is no longer acceptable for any college or university to avoid or defer an online strategy. This is incredibly important. Many universities will play in the MOOC sideshow for a few years before developing a real strategy. Others will see straightaway that they need to take advantage of technology to develop innovative new programs that address social and economic needs, and that are accessible 

and affordable in a way that is difficult to imagine today.

 

"This is where the second contribution comes into play. Reading the Ithaka S&R report released in May 2011 on Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education – a report co-authored by William Bowen and Larry Bacow, the former President of Tufts – it’s clear
that “machine-guided learning” is emerging. According to Bowen and Bacow, machine-guided learning has the potential “to greatly expand the reach of the nation’s colleges and universities to populations currently not served, while at the same time helping to bend the cost curve in higher
education... It also has the potential to benefit students by allowing them to have more targeted and personalized learning experiences.”

 

"Many of the technologies that are and will be deployed by companies like Coursera, Udacity and edX will be instrumental in helping to test and prove the concept of machine-guided learning. By deploying these technologies in the politically safe MOOC format, elite universities will provide air cover (with accreditors, regulators and with prospective students) for new digital
community colleges and state university systems to deploy them in the context of degree programs."

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Tracy Hanson's curator insight, May 12, 2013 6:28 PM

Don't blink - life will pass you by!

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Embodied Cognition and Design: A New Approach and Vocabulary | Moments of Genius | Big Think

Embodied Cognition and Design: A New Approach and Vocabulary | Moments of Genius | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Sam McNerney

 

"...it is inherently difficult for designers to explain and ultimately sell an idea to an analytically minded client. After all, with money on the line it is probably not reassuring if you, the client, hear from a designer that a design will work because it “elicits warmth” “feels positive” or “conforms to human nature.” These abstractions may correctly describe a design but they did not communicate, in concrete terms, its potential value well. 

 

"In a recent exchange Michael explained how embodiment might provide a new vocabulary with two examples. One involved a premium home goods project, in which he and his team gathered from consumer interviews that certain production details like hand sewn contrast stitching (as opposed to laser-welded seams) created impressions of authenticity and longevity. They converged on the product direction, “materials that wear in instead of wearing out” and used leather because scuffs and creases communicated personalization and durability. 

 

"In the second project Michael and his team wanted to design a product that communicated healthiness. He knew that taut, plump corners suggested “healthy” while ruffled corners suggested “wrinkled” and “old” but needed to show clients why. To do this Michael and his team juxtaposed a freshly picked apple with a withered apple and asked the client which one they would like to eat. The entire boardroom chose the fresh apple and the capital expenditure was approved for design production."

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How Do You Teach Empathy? Harvard Pilots Game Simulation | MindShift

How Do You Teach Empathy? Harvard Pilots Game Simulation | MindShift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Katrina Schwartz

 

"A group of Harvard education researchers have developed a virtual simulation for “walking in another person’s shoes” to help students relate to one another better. It’s part of a project calledSocial Aspects of Immersive Learning (SAIL) funded by the National Science Foundation. “The ability to accurately read people is really important to make compromises,” said Elisabeth Hahn, a doctoral candidate at the Harvard School of Education in a recent edWeb webinar"

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 11, 2013 7:16 AM

More virtual life training. 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:53 PM

This is worth delving into and exploring more thoroughly.

Deborah Banker's curator insight, May 12, 2013 2:09 PM

The ability to place students in a safe simulation to experience how someone else has to live, I have found to be a powerful learning experience for college students who will be dealing with challenged children in the future classrooms.

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Excel Blog - Public preview of project codename “GeoFlow” for Excel delivers 3D data visualization and storytelling

Excel Blog - Public preview of project codename “GeoFlow” for Excel delivers 3D data visualization and storytelling | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

With GeoFlow, you can:

Map Data: Plot more than one million rows of data from an Excel workbook, including the Excel Data Model or PowerPivot, in 3D on Bing maps. Choose from columns, heat maps, and bubble visualizations.Discover Insights: Discover new insights by seeing your data in geographic space and seeing time-stamped data change over time. Annotate or compare data in a few clicks.Share Stories: Capture "scenes" and build cinematic, guided "tours" that can be shared broadly, engaging audiences like never before.


Via siobhan-o-flynn, blogbrevity
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blogbrevity's curator insight, April 21, 2013 8:00 AM

"GeoFlow originated in Microsoft Research, evolving out of the successful WorldWide Telescope project for scientific and academic communities to explore large volumes of astronomical and geological data."

luiy's curator insight, April 22, 2013 4:57 AM

With GeoFlow, you can:

Map Data: Plot more than one million rows of data from an Excel workbook, including the Excel Data Model or PowerPivot, in 3D on Bing maps. Choose from columns, heat maps, and bubble visualizations.Discover Insights: Discover new insights by seeing your data in geographic space and seeing time-stamped data change over time. Annotate or compare data in a few clicks.Share Stories: Capture "scenes" and build cinematic, guided "tours" that can be shared broadly, engaging audiences like never before.
David W. Deeds's curator insight, May 11, 2013 7:17 AM

I might actually use Excel again! 

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Half an Hour: Assessment in MOOCs

Half an Hour: Assessment in MOOCs | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

First of all, the MOOCs I have worked on have not focused on assessment - they have been courses, yes, with a small number (20 or so) taking them for credit, but the vast majority of participants auditing. So the question of marking term papers never came up. And like you, I would not contemplate multiple-choice exams in humanities and literature courses.

If you really need assessment, a few solutions have been proposed and, to a limited extend, tried out:


Via Kim Flintoff, Jenny Pesina
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Jan Zanetis's curator insight, May 5, 2013 1:32 AM

You don't hear much about this side of MOOC's

Jean Jacoby's curator insight, May 5, 2013 4:46 PM

Excellent overview with useful links to exemplars.

Amparo Toral's curator insight, May 6, 2013 3:37 AM

A must read on assessment in MOOC, with very useful links and reflections.

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Jane McGonigal Keynote, "The Game That Changed My Life" | Games For Change 2013 Conference

"After years of making games to change the world — partnering with organizations like the World Bank, the International Olympic Committee, the American Heart Association, and the New York Public Library — keynote speaker and New York Times bestselling author Jane McGonigal has a new goal: making games to change lives. In this talk, she recounts the personal story of how a game saved her own life — and how it led her to discover the top 5 things that virtually all gamers hope to change about their own lives."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, May 6, 2013 6:47 PM

I have read about 125 pages of McGonigals enthralling book "Reality Is Broken" and am very taken with her ideas, research, and point of view.

This preso, from 2012, amplifies, and in some cases clarifies, the themes and ponts from the book. What the book can never do is provide the clear view of McGonigle's energy, passion, and stunning insights that comes from a live presentation.

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The Ultimate Education Reform: Messy Learning & Problem Solving

The Ultimate Education Reform: Messy Learning & Problem Solving | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Tim Holt

 

"Problems like the ones I’ve mentioned above are called “messy problem” by some educators and “ill-structured problems” by others. Messy problems have no single, certifiably correct answer. There is no “one right way” to solve a problem like “should I get married” or “what should I study in college?” The answer is the goal, but the answer can manifest itself in many correct ways and lead to a lot of unexpected learning along the way. Ambiguity envelopes us. It begins at birth and follows us through to the last days of our lives. Start to finish, life is messy.

 

"I love ill-structured problems. When offered in a classroom setting, they present students with real life situations and devilish dilemmas. Problem based learning, a methodology begun in the late 1960’s in medical schools in Canada (and expanded into K12 education in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s) was developed after medical experts in teaching hospitals could not understand why otherwise excellent interns froze up when real life humans were placed in front of them with real life problems (there might even be panic and bleeding).

 

"After long investigation, if became clear to instructors that while the students were “book smart” and could recite page after page of diagnostic information from memory, most patients did not present their symptoms in a way that matched the book: “You know Doc, my elbow hurts just like the description on page 354 of the Jensen Ortho text,” said no patient ever.

 

"We need to move away from the pedagogy of the single answer and move towards teaching the messy problems of Problem Based Learning. This is different than Project Based Learning (as I wrote about here), where the end goal is already known (and thus a single correct answer is reached in many cases). Life does not work so much like a project; human development is pretty much Problem Based Learning. The best outcome or solution is usually not known when the problem is presented. Sometimes it is, but not often."

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Julie Hall Huber's curator insight, May 22, 2013 4:49 PM

Excellent article that really lays out why PBL is important. Very easy read!

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Towards a New Strategy for Human Evolution

Towards a New Strategy for Human Evolution | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

 

Date: 15–16 June 2013

Venue: Alice Tully Hall, Lincoln Center, New York, USA

 

Preliminary Congress Program

 

The second international Global Future 2045 congress will take place on 15-16 June 2013 at the Lincoln Center in New York, and will be focused on discussion of a new evolutionary strategy for humanity aimed at overcoming the 21st century’s civilization challenges. The strategy is based on carrying out two revolutions: spiritual and sci-tech. We believe this is the only way to overcome existing crises.

 

At the congress, a vision will be presented for the spiritual transformation of humanity, and new technologies will be demonstrated which are likely to form the basis of the sci-tech revolution. The congress will also showcase our Avatar science mega-project, aimed at accelerating the creation of technologies enabling a gradual transition from our biological bodies to an increasingly advanced artificial carrier of the human self.

 

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, May 17, 2013 8:21 AM

This is shaping up to be a great event for future-oriented thinkers. Ray Kurzweil is one of the featured speakers. I'll be there!

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National Academies Keck Future Initiative: The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Team Summaries

National Academies Keck Future Initiative: The Informed Brain in a Digital World: Interdisciplinary Team Summaries | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Digital media provide humans with more access to information than ever before—a computer, tablet, or smartphone can all be used to access data online and users frequently have more than one device. However, as humans continue to venture into the digital frontier, it remains to be known whether access to seemingly unlimited information is actually helping us learn and solve complex problems, or ultimately creating more difficulty and confusion for individuals and societies by offering content overload that is not always meaningful.

 

"Throughout history, technology has changed the way humans interact with the world. Improvements in tools, language, industrial machines, and now digital information technology have shaped our minds and societies. There has always been access to more information than humans can handle, but the difference now lies in the ubiquity of the Internet and digital technology, and the incredible speed with which anyone with a computer can access and participate in seemingly infinite information exchange. Humans now live in a world where mobile digital technology is everywhere, from the classroom and the doctor's office to public transportation and even the dinner table. This paradigm shift in technology comes with tremendous benefits and risks. Interdisciplinary Research (IDR) Teams at the 2012 National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference on The Informed Brain in the Digital World explored common rewards and dangers to Humans among various fields that are being greatly impacted by the Internet and the rapid evolution of digital technology.

 

"Keynote speaker Clifford Nass of Stanford University opened the dialogue by offering insight into what we already know about how the "information overload" of the digital world may be affecting our brains. Nass presented the idea of the "media budget," which states that when a new media emerges, it takes time away from other media in a daily time budget. When additional media appear and there is no time left in a person's daily media budget, people begin to "double book" media time. Personal computers, tablets, and smartphones make it easy to use several media simultaneously, and according to Nass, this double-booking of media can result in chronic multitasking, which effects how people store and manage memory. Although current fast-paced work and learning environments often encourage multitasking, research shows that such multitasking is inefficient, decreases productivity, and may hinder cognitive function. National Academies Keck Future Initiative: The Informed Brain in a Digital World summarizes the happenings of this conference."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Free download from National Academies Press, just published.

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How to Turn an Urban School District Around—Without Cheating | The Atlantic

How to Turn an Urban School District Around—Without Cheating | The Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Greg Anrig

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"The Cincinnati school district has improved both test scores and graduation rates since 2003 while -- unlike Atlanta and Washington -- transparently pursuing highly collaborative reform strategies that, counter to the current trend, don't rely on rigid hierarchy and punitive accountability. Because Cincinnati has implemented proven instructional approaches while nurturing a culture in which administrators, teachers, parents, and community groups closely communicate and work together as teams, the case serves as an important counterweight to the public school stories that have been dominating the news in the past few years. It also can serve as a roadmap for reversing course from the high-pressure tactics that gave rise to the cheating scandals and led to little progress elsewhere."

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The hijacking of charter schools | NewsObserver.com

The hijacking of charter schools |  NewsObserver.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Edward B. Fiske, former education editor of the NY Times

Summary by Public Education NewsBlast

 

"As a longtime supporter of charter schools, Edward Fiske in The News-Observer writes he is distressed to watch Republican legislators "attempting to hijack this once-promising notion for school improvement, and transform it into a force for undermining public education in North Carolina." Fiske feels the promise of charters was originally many-faceted: freedom to innovate and explore new curricula and teaching methods that, if successful, could make their way into traditional public schools. Parents and students had a wider range of educational options, and teachers had space to work in collegial fashion around innovative educational visions. There is now a movement afoot in North Carolina to make charters the norm, and this would require a cumbersome bureaucracy that would eventually stifle the educational creativity for which charters were established. Republican leaders in the North Carolina legislature are pushing a charter school "reform" program that would undermine the fundamental principles that have driven the charter movement in North Carolina and elsewhere. All North Carolinians who believe in the importance of quality public education should resist the Republican proposals, Fiske says. Students whose experience in a charter does not work out will need access to traditional public schools. The movement needs advocates who still believe in the promise of charters and the possibilities they hold." 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Quite a curious turn in the convoluted history of charter schools

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For the First Time, SAT Test Gets Canceled in an Entire Country | Time magazine

For the First Time, SAT Test Gets Canceled in an Entire Country | Time magazine | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kayla Webley

 

"Some 1,500 South Korean students who dream of attending eliteAmerican colleges are scrambling after the U.S.-based administrator of the SAT cancelled the scheduled May 4 session of the exam because of allegations of widespread cheating. It’s the first time the SAT test has been called off in an entire country.

 

"Officials decided to cancel the exam after discovering test questions circulating in test-prep centers in the country, according to the Wall Street Journal. The College Board, which administers the SAT in the U.S., and the Educational Testing Service (ETS), the nonprofit organization that develops, publishes and scores the tests, issued a statement, saying they had made the “difficult, but necessary” decision to cancel the exam. “This action is being taken in response to information provided to ETS—the College Board’s vendor for global test administration and security—by the Supreme Prosecutors’ Office regarding tutoring companies in the Republic of Korea that are alleged to have illegally obtained SAT and SAT Subject Test materials for their own commercial benefit.”

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Will Apple Need a Social Network to Manage Their iWatch?

Will Apple Need a Social Network to Manage Their iWatch? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Wearable technology will change us and Apple more than you expect.  I like how this article shares both what wearable technology will do as addresses what it will not do.  


Via Ken Morrison
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Ken Morrison's curator insight, May 12, 2013 12:50 AM

Will wearable technology force Apple to purchase or create a social network?  Mike Elgan says YES.  

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Hey MOOCs, Get Smarter | University Ventures Letters

Hey MOOCs, Get Smarter | University Ventures Letters | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"If MOOCs hope to find a business model that is simpatico with traditional higher education rather than at war with it, they have two hurdles. First, they need to incorporate interaction with instructors and award real certificates. Second, they need to meet the GetSmarter criteria, which means gently directing university partners to more practical offerings.

 

"Unfortunately, there is also a third hurdle – one that is insurmountable for some institutions. The GetSmarter model works in South Africa because University of Cape Town is far and away the country’ s top higher education brand. So once they get smarter, MOOC providers may well regret expanding their rosters of universities beyond (and now far beyond) the super-elite.

 

"As with most new markets, many of the follower universities starting to offer MOOCs will have as much trouble making the GetSmarter business model work as they will convincing their own faculty to award credit. These institutions are destined to continue California Dreamin’ in search of a viable MOOC business model."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Quite a penetrating analysis of the business model, or lack thereof, among present MOOC leaders.

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
E-readers and tablets are becoming more popular as such technologies improve, but research suggests that reading on paper still boasts unique advantages

Via RitaZ, NikolaosKourakos
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RitaZ's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:00 AM
Teachers need to find a way to take advantage of the different modes of reading for different purposes in order to reap the benefits of each (and to teach our students to do so). Thanks, Adele! 
Ken Morrison's curator insight, May 12, 2013 3:12 PM

This article does a great job and helping us realize the real and perceived reasons why people feel that reading on paper is more benefitial for them. At this point in history, people do tend to remember more if they read from paper.  We can often remember which region of a page we learned something even if we read it several weeks ago.  We like the transition of one side of the book being heavier than the other as we progress through the pages.  Book designers take great efforts to design how books look, feel and smell.  Digital books are disrupting our experience and interaction with the written text.  Many people are in a mental state before reading a printed text that it is more serious and meaningful.  This mindset may be changing how we engage the brain and thus how much we remember.

 

 

luiy's curator insight, May 13, 2013 5:54 PM

But why, one could ask, are we working so hard to make reading with new technologies like tablets and e-readers so similar to the experience of reading on the very ancient technology that is paper? Why not keep paper and evolve screen-based reading into something else entirely? Screens obviously offer readers experiences that paper cannot. Scrolling may not be the ideal way to navigate a text as long and dense as Moby Dick, but the New York Times, Washington Post, ESPN and other media outlets have created beautiful, highly visual articles that depend entirely on scrolling and could not appear in print in the same way. Some Web comics andinfographics turn scrolling into a strength rather than a weakness. Similarly, Robin Sloan has pioneered the tap essay for mobile devices. The immensely popular interactive Scale of the Universe tool could not have been made on paper in any practical way. New e-publishing companies like Atavist offer tablet readers long-form journalism with embedded interactive graphics, maps, timelines, animations and sound tracks. And some writers are pairing up with computer programmers to produce ever more sophisticated interactive fiction and nonfiction in which one's choices determine what one reads, hears and sees next.

When it comes to intensively reading long pieces of plain text, paper and ink may still have the advantage. But text is not the only way to read.

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Empathy: the Key to Social and Emotional Learning | MindShift

Empathy: the Key to Social and Emotional Learning | MindShift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Katrina Schwartz

 

"Educators are aware that social problems like poverty, unsafe neighborhoods, violence, and family trauma can affect how students learn when they come to school. Though teaching subjects like math and literacy are the biggest part of their job, in many cases they’re also called on to attend to their students’ emotional health as well, incorporating social and emotional skills.

 

“Science is starting to show that there is a very strong integration between social and emotional skills and learning,” said Vicki Zakrzewski, education director of the Greater Good Science Center at U.C. Berkeley, which studies the psychology, sociology and neuroscience of well-being during a recent Forum radio show. “Some scientists believe that cognitive achievement is 50 percent of the equation and social and emotional skills are the other 50 percent.”

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This Year’s Thiel Fellows Include A Fashion Designer, A Poet, And A Harvard Dropout | Fast Company

This Year’s Thiel Fellows Include A Fashion Designer, A Poet, And A Harvard  Dropout | Fast Company | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Anya Kamenetz

 

"As in past years, the 2013 fellows are weighted severely towards guys--only four women among them. They are a bit more international than they have been previously, with participants from Canada, Britain, India, China, and Singapore. One of them founded India’s answer to Airbnb, another has been doing research at MIT since he was 13, and Maddy Maxey is the Thiel Fellows’ first fashion designer. In addition, two of the fellows are working on education-related projects, which seems to be a personal favorite of Thiel’s. "If you focus on solving your own problems, you know your company will always have at least one customer," Jonathan Cain, president of the Thiel Foundation, told Fast Company. "Since young people are the ones currently suffering through school, they are well-equipped to identify what’s broken in education."

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The More You Automate, The Less You Curate: Sense-Making Requires Manual Effort

The More You Automate, The Less You Curate: Sense-Making Requires Manual Effort | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Martin Gysler's comment, May 15, 2013 4:57 AM
Yes Deborah, I totally agree with you.
Robin Martin's comment, May 15, 2013 10:28 AM
Absolutely agree!
Robin Martin's comment, May 15, 2013 10:28 AM
Absolutely agree!