:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Human Brain Adopts Internet as Memory Substitute | Innovationnewsdaily.com

Human Brain Adopts Internet as Memory Substitute | Innovationnewsdaily.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Throughout history, curmudgeonly scholars have argued that information technology makes people more stupid. Socrates complained that the written word would lead to forgetfulness, and bookmakers of the Renaissance feared the printing press would lead to a loss of studiousness as cheap books fell into the hands of the unworthy. Recently, journalists and scientists have made similar claims about the Internet in general and search engines in particular. After all, why learn something when you can just look it up?

Now researchers have tested this notion through a number of experiments that probe the relationship between memory and the Internet. The results imply that people have shifted from remembering specific facts to remembering where on the Internet they can go to find those facts.

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More than just digital quilting

More than just digital quilting | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

THE scene in the park surrounding New York’s Hall of Science, on a sunny weekend in mid-September, resembles a futuristic craft fair. Booths displaying handmade clothes sit next to a pavilion full of electronics and another populated by toy robots. In one corner visitors can learn how to pick locks, in another how to use a soldering iron. All this and much more was on offer at an event called Maker Faire, which attracted more than 35,000 visitors. This show and an even bigger one in Silicon Valley, held every May, are the most visible manifestations of what has come to be called the “maker” movement. It started on America’s West Coast but is spreading around the globe: a Maker Faire was held in Cairo in October.


The maker movement is both a response to and an outgrowth of digital culture, made possible by the convergence of several trends. New tools and electronic components let people integrate the physical and digital worlds simply and cheaply. Online services and design software make it easy to develop and share digital blueprints. And many people who spend all day manipulating bits on computer screens are rediscovering the pleasure of making physical objects and interacting with other enthusiasts in person, rather than online. Currently the preserve of hobbyists, the maker movement’s impact may be felt much farther afield.

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Population Bomb Author's Fix For Next Extinction: Educate Women: Scientific American

Population Bomb Author's Fix For Next Extinction: Educate Women: Scientific American | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"The fate of biological diversity for the next 10 million years will almost certainly be determined during the next 50 to 100 years by the activities of a single species," write Ehrlich and Pringle in their proposal for addressing the biodiversity crisis. Adds Pringle: "The world's remaining wild areas and the species in them are being pulverized, and that's a multi-layered tragedy."


That’s why Ehrlich and Pringle call for educating women, which has slowed or stopped population growth in the developed countries of Europe. "Education and employment—for women especially—along with access to contraception and safe abortions are the most important components," they write. Adds Ehrlich: "The most basic response is to get going on stopping population growth and starting a decline. Second is doing something about consumption. If you don't do anything about those, then you are in trouble in all the others: more people, means more greenhouse gases, which means more rapid climate change."

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A response to the news from Apple | This American Life

A response to the news from Apple | This American Life | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Jan. 13, 2012

There's news from Apple today, relating to some of the issues discussed in our program last week “Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory.”


For the first time, Apple has released a list of companies that build its products around the world.

In another first, the company also announced that it will allow an independent third party to check on working conditions at those factories, and to make its findings public.

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Will Neuroscience Kill the Novel? | Book Think | Big Think

Will Neuroscience Kill the Novel? | Book Think | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Virginia Woolf once wrote that “human character changed on or around December, 1910.” It’s a deliberately cryptic remark, but she was referring broadly to the wave of cultural modernism that blasted the relatively tidy world of late nineteenth-century Europe into the fractured cosmos of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, and World War I.


I thought of Woolf’s pronouncement last December, when I read this New York Times article about neuroscientists’ quest to map the human brain in its entirety. The project is only the latest to signal a scientific revolution in our understanding of the self—one that puts Freud’s essentially literary revolution to shame. A century after Woolf’s epochal moment, I wonder if we're witnessing an even greater cultural watershed.


The implications stagger the mind, or at least engorge the frontal lobe. How will a deterministic, neurological account of motivation change our notions of “guilt” or “innocence” before the law? How will a precise grasp of the neurobiology of attraction affect the human mating dance? (I can’t wait for that pharmaceutical arms race.) And most compelling from Woolf’s perspective: how will knowing our own brains so well change literature?

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Help Students Use Social Media to Empower, Not Just Connect | Edutopia

Help Students Use Social Media to Empower, Not Just Connect | Edutopia | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

 By Andrew Marcinek

 

From the blog:

 

Students get it. They understand how easy it is to connect with one another, but don't fully realize the greater potential. As educators, we have all benefited greatly from our personal learning network or critical friends group. Some of us have garnered a job, found great content area resources, or tuned in to a conference. But are we transferring that potential to our students? And if so, are we giving them the proper guidance to travel down these varied paths?


There is no denying that students see the potential in using social media, but are they really using it to their advantage? A colleague of mine shared with me a sentiment one of her students said this past week. The student said, "Could you check my Facebook profile, I want to make sure it is appropriate for colleges to view." Eureka! One student gets it, however this sentiment while encouraging to any teacher, is not using social media networks to their full potential. It is only scratching the surface. In short, it’s like hearing, "What do I need to know for the test?"


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Kent Wallén
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ASCD and Pearson To Launch PD Program for Principals -- THE Journal

ASCD and Pearson To Launch PD Program for Principals -- THE Journal | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Interesting development. We'll be watching... - JL


ASCD and Pearson have teamed up with the Marzano Research Laboratory to develop Principal Compass, a cloud based leadership program for K-12 school principals and leadership teams.

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The Innovative Educator: A Dream to Be Free At Last From State Standardized Tests

The Innovative Educator: A Dream to Be Free At Last From State Standardized Tests | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Parents across the nation are fed up with a government sucking data out of or students like a vampire who needs their blood to survive. Fortunately, the jig is up. Parents have caught on to the fact that not only does all this ineffective, inaccurate, and outdated testing and prepping do nothing to help their children, but the reality is that it is harming them. Schools are literally turning parent’s once vibrant, playful, smart, and creative young treasures into student zombies who must memorize, regurgitate, and do what they’re told. If they don’t they are all to happy to drug into submission children who resist such efforts.

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Rainn Wilson on Overcoming Creative Blocks

Rainn Wilson on Overcoming Creative Blocks | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Most of us know actor Rainn Wilson as Dwight from The Office — the egomaniacal yet petty creep who has delivered many a palmface moments for cringing audiences. So it’s interesting — eerie, almost — to see Wilson step far outside his character and reveal what is indeed a rather thoughtful, introspective, profound persona. In this excellent Big Think interview, he talks about creativity, chess, meditation and how to overcome creative blocks — a worthwhile addition to our collection of insights on creativity from thinkers like Stefan Sagmeister, Paula Scher, Sir Ken Robinson, Ji Lee, Paola Antonelli and Steven Johnson.

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RSA - Where Do Good Ideas Come From? | Steven Johnson - video

RSA - Where Do Good Ideas Come From? | Steven Johnson - video | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Steven Johnson has spent twenty years immersed in creative industries, was active at the dawn of the internet and has a unique perspective that draws on his fluency in fields ranging from neurobiology to new media. Why have cities historically been such hubs of innovation? What do the printing press and Apple have in common? And what does this have to do with the creation and evolution of life itself?


By recognizing where and how patterns of creativity occur – whether within a school, a software platform or a social movement – he shows how we can make more of our ideas good ones.

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Christoph Niemann on Happiness, Work and Creativity | Brain Pickings

Christoph Niemann on Happiness, Work and Creativity | Brain Pickings | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

How yoga is killing kerning, or what chasing butterflies has to do with divine inspiration.


I’m a really big Christoph Niemann fan, so I was thrilled to see him speak last month at Creative Mornings, the fantastic breakfast lecture series by my lovely studiomate Tina (a.k.a. Swiss Miss), dubbed “TED for the rest of us.” Charming, irreverent and self-deprecating as ever, Christoph dances across everything from finding happiness at work to what it takes to have a good idea to the myth of “talent” to how to overcome writer’s block.

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Can the Middle Class Be Saved? The Atlantic

Can the Middle Class Be Saved? The Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The Great Recession has accelerated the hollowing-out of the American middle class. And it has illuminated the widening divide between most of America and the super-rich. Both developments herald grave consequences. Here is how we can bridge the gap between us.

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Curation Coming To Television and Film: Channelisation

Curation Coming To Television and Film: Channelisation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Jon Miller of News Corp may have predicted 2012 will see the "channelisation" of the web, but he really means a renewed focus on curation..."

 

"Channelisation implies that media corporations such as News Corp will be the ones controlling the playlist of content, but 2012 will see the role of such organisations fall back to providing content for others to turn into a wealth of different “channels” where the barrier to entry essentially falls to zero."

 

Key highlights curated from the article:

 

Curation of niche interest: channelisation

"...opening up of video on demand services from all these channels will allow much smaller organisations to provide cross-channel curation.

 

If the channels who provide the content are still showing their ads before, during and after each show, then curators could start channels focusing on more specific interests and smaller niches than a broadcast channel could do – there will be channels dedicated to crime shows, medical shows, shows with appearances from certain actors, and more.

 

A user will just have to think of a single genre or idea that they want to watch in a show, and there will be a “channel” or that."

 

The curator
"More interesting than the drive to smaller and smaller niches, which could, at least in part, be algorithmically generated – will be the focus on the curator.

 

If a user trusts the taste of a journalist, presenter, blogger or other figure – they may be more interested to watch the content that user picks than the content programmed for any particular channel.

 

...These curators could add to the content by providing commentary from their own knowledge of the content – offering a place where consumers could find a new love."

 

 

Social Curation
"...Equally, groups of curators could join together to offer more regular programming than the one-off playlists of individuals, basically creating “channels” without any of the budget and monetary constraints of a real channel.

 

They would not have to pay for licensing as the content owners will bundle ads with the in-stream content, and so people will curate out of love and interest rather than having to focus on budgetary constraints."

 

Read the full article here: http://www.techfruit.com/2012/01/12/channelisation-curation/ 

(Curated by Robin Good)


Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello
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janlgordon's comment, January 12, 2012 4:38 PM
This is great news! I feel like it's Christmas all over again - think of all the possibilities, especiaily the Social Curation where groups of curators get together to offer regular programming. This is my favorite part "so people will curate out of love and interest rather than having to focus on budgetary constraints." My head is spinning, so many ideas flooding my brain, I need to curate my thoughts:-)
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Student Innovators Hack Kinect & Cancer to Win $100,000 Prizes | Innovationnewsdaily.com

Student Innovators Hack Kinect & Cancer to Win $100,000 Prizes | Innovationnewsdaily.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
America's top high school science fair projects target cancer with nanoparticles and use Microsoft's Kinect gaming sensor to analyze prosthetic movements.
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THE WEB IS THE GREATEST INVENTION | More Intelligent Life

THE WEB IS THE GREATEST INVENTION | More Intelligent Life | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
We have been inventing things for millions of years. But which is the best of them? Samantha Weinberg draws up criteria for the third in our series of Big Questions, and makes her choice ...
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MIT TechTV – Google's Eric Schmidt at MIT Sloan: "The Future of the Global Mind"

Video: "With knowledge and data, a smarter world will divide work between humans and computers, Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt said in this Nov. 15, 2011 talk at MIT Sloan.
Featuring an introduction by Patrick J. McGovern (1959) Professor of Management Thomas Malone, the talk was part of the MIT Sloan Dean's Innovative Leader Series."


Via Howard Rheingold
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Your Storytelling Brain | Think Tank | Big Think

Your Storytelling Brain | Think Tank | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it


'Mesmerizing!'

'Stunning!'

'A Mind-Blowing Triumph!'


Mock these movie poster clichés if you will, but they speak to something we want from a story from about the age of two onward. Some of us might get a bit finicky in later years about which stories we allow to seduce us, and how many spoonfuls of critical reflection we want along with our dose of narrative intoxicant, but there's no getting around it: humans love stories. In fact, in some fundamental sense, we need them.


Cognitive science has long recognized narrative as a basic organizing principle of memory. From early childhood, we tell ourselves stories about our actions and experiences. Accuracy is not the main objective – coherence is. If necessary, our minds will invent things that never happened, people who don't exist, simply to hold the narrative together. How often have you had a fierce disagreement with a partner or sibling over who gave you that Three Tenors CD or which of you made the pathetic clay reindeer Christmas ornament? How can two eyewitnesses at a trial be absolutely convinced of two conflicting accounts of the same events?

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How To Use Game Dynamics In The Classroom | Edudemic

How To Use Game Dynamics In The Classroom | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Edudemic is all about finding innovative ways to get through to students. That’s why we’ve talked about game dynamics more than a few times. Inspiring students to learn through the gamification of a large lecture hall has not yet been broached by us Edudemic-ers.


Lucky for us, Liz Gross has an incredible look at the gamification in her newest post “Can Game Dynamics Improve Attendance, Grades, and Engagement In A Large Lecture Course?” Below are some selected excerpts that I thought would be important for the discussion.


Via Jon Samuelson, Kent Wallén
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Sir Ken Robinson, March 2011, Learning Without Frontiers - Technology Integration in Education

Sir Ken Robinson, March 2011, Learning Without Frontiers - Technology Integration in Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Edited highlights from Sir Ken Robinson's talk at Learning Without Frontiers recorded March 16th, 2011, London. Title: Creativity, Learning, and the Curriculum

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Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory | This American Life

Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory | This American Life | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Mike Daisey performs an excerpt that was adapted for radio from his one-man show "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs." A lifelong Apple superfan, Daisey sees some photos online from the inside of a factory that makes iPhones, starts to wonder about the people working there, and flies to China to meet them. His show restarts a run at New York's Public Theater later this month. (39 minutes)

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Five Manifestos for the Creative Life

Five Manifestos for the Creative Life | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Some days everyone needs a little extra encouragement. The words or lines or colors don’t want to come, or worse, we don’t even want to sit down to create. That’s when we turn to these inspiring manifestos, any one of which is guaranteed to give our uncooperative creativity a sharp kick in the pants. Here are five of our favorite contemporary manifestos that nudge ideas out of your head and into the hands of the world.

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Can Crowd-Funding become a Hotbed for Innovation in Education? | Disrupt Education | Big Think

Can Crowd-Funding become a Hotbed for Innovation in Education? | Disrupt Education | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Crowd-funding platforms like Kickstarter and IndieGoGo have become a huge phenomenon in the tech & geek space in 2011. The idea behind those platforms is pretty simple. People who want to raise money for a project, product or cause set up a campaign and the community decides if they want to back those projects or not.


I think crowd-funding can play a key role in pushing education forward as the same rules apply. Often great ideas aren’t brought to the market because they didn’t attract the interest of investors or the creators are not sure if anyone was be interested in the product and then simply step back from their ideas.

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5 Timeless Books of Insight on Fear and the Creative Process

5 Timeless Books of Insight on Fear and the Creative Process | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
From Monet to Tiger Woods, or why creating rituals and breaking routines don't have to be conflicting notions.


“Creativity is like chasing chickens,” Christoph Niemann once said. But sometimes it can feel like being chased by chickens — giant, angry, menacing chickens. Whether you’re a writer, designer, artist or maker of anything in any medium, you know the creative process can be plagued by fear, often so paralyzing it makes it hard to actually create. Today, we turn to insights on fear and creativity from five favorite books on the creative process and the artist’s way.

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Harvard University Puts Course Syllabuses on Vimeo @simplyzesty

Harvard University Puts Course Syllabuses on Vimeo @simplyzesty | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Harvard University has taken an innovative approach to producing course syllabuses, producing videos of professors speaking in detail about the syllab...


Via Jenny Pesina, michel verstrepen
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maxOz's comment, January 14, 2012 2:36 AM
Jenny, Hope you are having a nice break, Happy 2012, x Michele
Jenny Pesina's comment, January 14, 2012 2:39 AM
Thanks, Michele - great to see Harvard's material on Vimeo!
Jenny Pesina's comment, January 14, 2012 2:39 AM
Hope you are a lovely break too, Michele, cheers!
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Is The Internet Turning Books Into Perpetual Works-in-Progress? | The New Republic

Is The Internet Turning Books Into Perpetual Works-in-Progress? | The New Republic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

...today, e-books have made post-publication tinkering newly convenient. Amazon sends e-mails to customers to inform them when an updated text—with assorted typos and factual errors corrected—of a book they’ve purchased is available for download, as it has done with titles ranging from The Lord of the Rings to Stacey Schiff’s Cleopatra. Could the e-book become a mutable thing that evolves with its circumstances, independent of the book it descended from? And is this a sign that our expectation for a book is shifting from finished product to perpetual work-in-progress—or just the logical conclusion of a long tradition of multiple, unstable texts?

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