:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Google Glass and the Future of Technology | NY Times

Google Glass and the Future of Technology | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by David Pogue

 

"Now, Google emphasized — and so do I — that Google Glass is still at a very, very early stage. Lots of factors still haven’t been finalized, including what Glass will do, what the interface will look like, how it will work, and so on. Google doesn’t want to get the public excited about some feature that may not materialize in the final version. (At the moment, Google is planning to offer the prototypes to developers next year — for $1,500 — in anticipation of selling Glass to the public in, perhaps, 2014.)

 

"When you actually handle these things, you can’t believe how little they weigh. Less than a pair of sunglasses, in my estimation. Glass is an absolutely astonishing feat of miniaturization and integration.

 

"Inside the right earpiece — that is, the horizontal support that goes over your ear — Google has packed memory, a processor, a camera, speaker and microphone, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi antennas, accelerometer, gyroscope, compass and a battery. All inside the earpiece."

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ASCD Community: Create a Positive School Culture

ASCD Community: Create a Positive School Culture | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Brad Kuntz

Summary by ASCD WorldEducation SmartBrief

 

""A school's culture may appear too ubiquitous to define clearly, too pervasive to grasp fully, and too complex to evaluate, but it's too important to ignore," explains educator Brad Kuntz. In his regular Education Update column, Kuntz outlines steps you can take to improve your school culture. Ideas range from creating more opportunities for students to serve their communities to hosting study parties before exams"

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Research Links 'Responsive' Teaching to Academic Gains | Education Week

Research Links 'Responsive' Teaching to Academic Gains | Education Week | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Jaclyn Zubrzycki

Summary by Accomplished Teacher

 

"Fifth-graders attending schools in which teachers used the Responsive Classroom teaching method performed better on state math and reading exams than other students, researchers say. The social-emotional-learning approach focuses on how teachers' language and expectations can help students with social and emotional learning. Researchers say that of the 24 Virginia elementary schools in a three-year study, the schools that were most committed to using Responsive Classroom practices showed 23-point gain on state standardized tests."

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With federal funds lost, city sending trainees to stronger schools | GothamSchools

With federal funds lost, city sending trainees to stronger schools | GothamSchools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Rachel Cromidas

Summary by ASCD SmartBrief

 

"New York City schools are expanding a residency program that places teachers-in-training in classrooms alongside experienced teachers. The trainees work as teaching assistants for a year while they pursue master's degrees and must pledge to continue working in city schools for four years after completing their education. The program began last year by assigning trainees to struggling schools, and this year expands to place teachers-in-training in more successful schools. "

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Does It Pay to Become a Teacher? | NY Times

Does It Pay to Become a Teacher? | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Catherine Rampell

Summary by The Accomplished Teacher

 

"The gap between what the U.S. pays its teachers and similarly educated workers is greater than in most other developed countries, according to a recent report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. On average, elementary-school teachers in the U.S. earn 67% of the the earnings of an average college-educated worker -- less than the OECD average of 82%. A gap in earnings also exists among middle- and high-school teachers."

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Hechinger Report | Can handpicked teachers turn around an underperforming school?

Hechinger Report | Can handpicked teachers turn around an underperforming school? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

IBy Sara Neufeld

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"It was a fight to the finish, but Erskine Glover can honestly say he’s happy with the team of teachers who will be instructing his students this fall. Glover, principal of what’s momentarily known as Quitman Street Renew School, had a grueling summer interviewing more than 100 candidates for instructional positions, with dozens more weeded out by a recruiter. Fewer than half of the 60 teachers greeting children when they arrive back today were on staff when classes let out in June. Because Quitman is part of a showcase initiative to turn around Newark’s lowest-performing schools, Superintendent Cami Anderson handed Glover the unprecedented authority to hand pick who stands before his 530 pre-k through eighth grade pupils this year. And that meant a lot of changes."

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How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift

How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Suzie Boss

The following suggestions for turning K-12 classrooms into innovation spaces come from Boss' new book, " Bringing Innovation to School: Empowering Students to Thrive in a Changing World", published in July by Solution Tree.

 

"How do we fill the gap between saying we must encourage innovation and teaching students how to actually generate and execute original ideas? The answers are emerging from classrooms across the country where pioneering teachers are making innovation a priority. Their strategies vary widely, from tinkering workshops and design studios to digital gaming and global challenges. By emphasizing problem solving and creativity in the core curriculum, these advance scouts are demonstrating that innovation is both powerful and teachable.

 

"Here are eight tips to borrow from classrooms where teachers are reinventing yesterday’s schools as tomorrow’s idea factories."


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IS YOUR SCHOOL'S INTERNET ACCESS FAST ENOUGH FOR DIGITAL LEARNING?

IS YOUR SCHOOL'S INTERNET ACCESS FAST ENOUGH FOR DIGITAL LEARNING? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Lisa Nielsen

 

"While most schools have “Internet access,” the reality is that only 20% have enough for digital learning. Most school infrastructures are outdated and as a result, the Internet is too slow for kids to take advantage of 21st Century Learning.

 

"To bring attention to and address this issue, EducationSuperHighway is launching a National School Broadband Test in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Education to take an inventory of the state of Internet access in America's K-12 schools. Their objective is to collect 1 million responses (10 per school) on the ACTUAL performance of the Internet in our classrooms and school libraries."

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Why Creativity Blocks Happen (and How to Overcome Them) | Lifehacker

Why Creativity Blocks Happen (and How to Overcome Them) | Lifehacker | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Iris Shoor

From the website

 

"Is creativity something people are just born with? For many of us, creative thinking isn't purely intuitive—it's also plain hard work. As writer Iris Shoor explains, coming up with fresh ideas isn't always a natural gift—it's a skill that can be learned."

 

Several very good suggestions, nicely illustrated. -JL

 

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A Crash Course on Creativity | Stanford University

A Crash Course on Creativity | Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Free online course given by the brilliant Tina Seeling, Executive Director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and author of the wonderfully creative 2009 book "What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World" and the recently published "inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity".

 

Course is to start in Fall 2012 (nothing more specific given...I  signed up today and it hasn't started yet).

 

Information from the website:

 

"This crash course is designed to explore several factors that stimulate and inhibit creativity in individuals, teams, and organizations. In each session we will focus on a different variable related to creativity, such as framing problems, challenging assumptions, and creative teams.

 

"The course is highly experiential, requiring each student to participate actively, taking on weekly projects. Each Monday a new challenge will be presented, and the results are due the following Friday. Some of the challenges will be completed individually, and some will be done in teams. There will be a two-week project toward the end of the course that will allow you to use all the tools you have learned.

 

"To foster collaboration and learning between the students, we will craft teams for each assignment. Each project will be done with a different team, so students get a chance to work with a wide variety of participants. All submissions will be viewed and evaluated by the course participants. There will also be a course Twitter feed and Facebook page, and several scheduled Google Hangouts that will enable active discussions on specific topics."

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Learning with 'e's: The changing Web

Learning with 'e's: The changing Web | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steve Wheeler

 

"This is number 4 in the series of blog posts entitled 'Shaping Education for the Future.' Yesterday's post can be found at this link.

 

 

"We need to acknowledge that 'Web 2.0' remains a contested label for new and emergent properties that are found on the Web. It is a complex network of dynamic resources that we all acknowledge is constantly changing to adapt to the growing demand for entertainment, communication and access to knowledge. Debate focuses on whether the emerging social applications constitute a sea change or revolution in the Web (cf. Van Dijk, 2002) or simply another phase in its relentless progress. Personally, I find myself in agreement with Brian Winston (2003) who views the Web as a facet of gradual evolution rather than symptoms of sudden revolution. Essentially, the Web has become more social. As with most other technology innovations, Web 2.0 applications have grown out of the need for people to connect together, share experiences and knowledge, enhance their experiences and open up new possibilities in learning. Social software is software that enables people to both read from, and write onto web spaces. It truly is the ‘architecture of participation’ (Barsky and Purdon, 2006) and demands active engagement as a natural part of its character (Kamel Boulos and Wheeler, 2007)."

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Earning college credit for MOOCs through prior learning assessment | Inside Higher Ed

Earning college credit for MOOCs through prior learning assessment | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Paul Fain

 

"Here’s how the process could work: A student successfully completes a MOOC, like Coursera’s Social Network Analysis, which will be taught this fall by Lada Adamic, an associate professor at the University of Michigan. The student then describes what he or she learned in that course, backing it up with proof, in a portfolio developed with the help of LearningCounts.org or another service, perhaps offered by a college."


Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/15/earning-college-credit-moocs-through-prior-learning-assessment#ixzz25ze1Ztn2
Inside Higher Ed

 

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Reading, Math and Grit | NY Times

Reading, Math and Grit | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Another very positive review of Paul Tough's new book, "How Children Succeed". This one by Joe Nocera, columnist.

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Darling-Hammond and Barron Offer Blueprint for Teaching Children in the Digital Age | Learning, Design and Technology

Darling-Hammond and Barron Offer Blueprint for Teaching Children in the Digital Age | Learning, Design and Technology | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the Stanford University School of Education

 

"The Digital Age Teacher Preparation Council, established by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education, with support from the Joyce Foundation, released the report Take a Giant Step, detailing a multi-sector action plan to enhance teacher education and a higher quality, 21st century approach to the learning and healthy development of children in preschool and the primary grades.

 

"Co-chaired by Professor Linda Darling-Hammond of Stanford University and Michael H. Levine, the Cooney Center's Executive Director, the Council found that the integration of research-based and innovative training models are a key missing element in the design of quality early learning programs. From their review of research sponsored by foundations and government agencies, there is evidence that less than half of all early childhood programs in the U.S. are considered high quality and promote significant learning among underserved students. In addition, recent studies like Common Sense Media's report Zero to Eight: Children's Media Use in Americahave shown that children ages 3-8 are consuming between 4-7 hours of media daily. It is due to this shift that organizations such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children are updating professional practices to guide learning and development for today's children."

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 10, 2013 4:13 PM

This is information that everyone should take time to read and understand.

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Are You Smarter Than A 10th Grader? Take The Test | Huffington Post

Are You Smarter Than A 10th Grader? Take The Test | Huffington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Summary by ASCD SmartBrief

 

"The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development on Tuesday released this year's Education at a Glance report, providing statistics on many education indicators among member nations as well as a handful of other countries considered in the report. Among its findings, the report ranked the U.S. as the fifth most-educated country, while countries such as France, the Netherlands, Spain and Mexico were seen as leading the world in enroling young students in early-childhood education"

 

A second artlcle on the OECD report, written by Lesli Maxell   and published in Education Week, may be found at http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/09/11/04oecd.h32.html?tkn=YPLFWu7iexNR9R3g88eTWA8%2BNnElldupWmNC&cmp=clp-sb-ascdww

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Correcting Creativity: The Struggle for Eminence | Moments of Genius | Big Think

Correcting Creativity: The Struggle for Eminence | Moments of Genius | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Sam McNerney

 

"The psychology of creativity–both empirical research and popular literature for the lay audience–misses this. It reduces creativity to warm showers and blue rooms, forgetting that the life of the eminent creator is not soothing; it is a struggle–a grossly uneven wrestling match with the muses."

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Why College Isn't a Bubble | The Atl;antic

Why College Isn't a Bubble | The Atl;antic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
...and why we should still think of new ways to educate young adults...

 

By Jordan Weissmann

Summary by Carnegie Perpsectives

 

"Talking about "the price of a college education" is like talking about "the price of a car." Just as it's not so useful to discuss the cost of a BMW Z4 and a Ford Focus in the same breath, it's hard to put Harvard and Iowa State in the same discussion about tuition, because they operate on very different economic rules. Beyond that, your average undergrad probably won't pay the full sticker price for a degree. Need-based grants and scholarships play a big role in determining the final "net price" each student has to lay out for a year of school. So what's a fair way to judge the cost of college? "

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Google Launches Free Tool To Let You Run Your Own Online Courses | Edudemic

Google Launches Free Tool To Let You Run Your Own Online Courses | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Jeff Dunn

 

"Sensing the excitement from online education tools like edX, Google has just unveiled a (very beta) version of its own course building software. If you’ve ever wanted to run your own online courses, this might be worth your time.

 

"Google’s new Course Builder software comes on the heels of a massively popular online Google class ‘Power Searching With Google‘ hosted by Google’s Director of Research, Peter Norvig.

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FF's comment, September 13, 2012 12:33 AM
Excellent..
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How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift

How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Suzie Boss

The following suggestions for turning K-12 classrooms into innovation spaces come from Boss' new book, " Bringing Innovation to School: Empowering Students to Thrive in a Changing World", published in July by Solution Tree.

 

"How do we fill the gap between saying we must encourage innovation and teaching students how to actually generate and execute original ideas? The answers are emerging from classrooms across the country where pioneering teachers are making innovation a priority. Their strategies vary widely, from tinkering workshops and design studios to digital gaming and global challenges. By emphasizing problem solving and creativity in the core curriculum, these advance scouts are demonstrating that innovation is both powerful and teachable.

 

"Here are eight tips to borrow from classrooms where teachers are reinventing yesterday’s schools as tomorrow’s idea factories."


Via Cristin Kennedy, Jim Lerman
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Creative confidence and the power to change the world around us - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Learning

Creative confidence and the power to change the world around us - Ewan McIntosh | Digital Media & Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Ewan McIntosh

 

"The talk above from IDEO and d.school founder David Kelley contains a powerful trio of stories about how self-efficacy has moved on from its origins with Albert Bandura in seeing how phobics can overcome their phobias, to a set of understandings about how humans measure their progress towards goals and decide on their next steps based on those measurements, sentiments and reactions.

 

"Kelley's bias is on creative confidence and turning the tide on the number of people who, from the moment they're institutionalised in school through to adulthood, decide to tell people "I'm not creative". His belief is that, in the same way snake phobics can be trained to get themselves out of that phobia, creative-phobics can be trained to get themselves out of that hole, too. It all starts with a basic set of assumptions and processes like design thinking that turn that scary creative journey into a familiar well-trodden path:

 

"Much in the same way the snake phobic can see other people are not phobic, and must have found the means within themselves to be that way, we can realise that people we see as creative found a set of processes, steps and attitudes that allow them to think in that way."

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Why technology might not make children stupid, after all | boingboing

Why technology might not make children stupid, after all | boingboing | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Maggie Koerth-Baker

Paraphrasing Jay Giedd, a researcher at the National Institute of Mental Health:

 

"We might be missing the point when we worry about whether technology has gotten ahead of what our brains evolved to do. What our brains evolved to do is adapt. New technologies change the way we think—the shift from memorization to reading certainly did that. But that's not the same thing as making us stupid or stifling our capacity for creative thought. Instead, we take these tools and we find new ways to be creative. We take the tools and we use them to expand our knowledge of the world. It's what we did with books. Maybe we'll do the same thing with the Internet-rich, multi-tasking world we're building now."

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Designing a New Learning Environment | Stanford University

Designing a New Learning Environment | Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A free MOOC from Stanford University led by Paul Kim,  Chief Technology Officer and Assistant Dean for Stanford University School of Education. His courses focus on contextualized innovations in education, mobile empowerment design, and enterprising higher education systems. He is currently one of senior researchers for Programmable Open Mobile Internet, an NSF project to develop and evaluate ubiquitous wireless mobile computing and interactive systems for K-20 formal and informal learning and assessment scenarios."

 

Course starts in Fall 2012 (no additional information given). Course description:

 

"What constitutes learning in the 21st century? Should reading, watching, memorizing facts, and then taking exams be the only way to learn? Or could technology (used effectively) make learning more interactive, collaborative, and constructive? Could learning be more engaging and fun?

 

"We construct, access, visualize, and share information and knowledge in very different ways than we did decades ago. The amount and types of information created, shared, and critiqued every day is growing exponentially, and many skills required in today’s working environment are not taught in formal school systems. In this more complex and highly-connected world, we need new training and competency development—we need to design a new learning environment.

 

"The ultimate goal of this project-based course is to promote systematic design thinking that will cause a paradigm shift in the learning environments of today and tomorrow. Participants are not required to have computer programming skills, but must have 1) a commitment to working in a virtual team and 2) the motivation to help people learn better. All of us have been involved in the learning process at some point in our lives; in this course we invite educators, school leaders, researchers, students, parents, entrepreneurs, computer programmers, illustrators, interface designers, and all those who are interested in working together, to create a new learning environment.

 

"After the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Identify advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and potentials of at least 10 interactive learning models and solutions.

Describe how online communication, collaboration, and visualization technology play a role in the behavioral, cognitive, constructivist, and social dimensions of learning.

Describe the major components and processes involved in development of interactive education systems.

Communicate rationales of learning technology design approaches through team-oriented collaborations.

Evaluate the value of ideas, principles, and techniques used in educational media or systems.

 

"As a Final Team Project, students will design a new learning model catering to 21st century environments and learners. Each self-formed team will design and develop an application or system that combines team interaction activities and learning support features in ways that are effective and appropriate for today's computing and communication devices. Students must consider potential idiosyncrasies with various learning devices (e.g., tablet, phone, PC), infrastructure requirements (e.g., cellular network, wi-fi, Bluetooth), and any special hypothetical circumstances if relevant. In addition, each team must create and defend a business model (non-profit, for-profit, or hybrid) for the launch and scale up their solution.

 

"Additional consideration will be given to teams that come up with system feature ideas presenting meaningful learning interaction and performance analytics."

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Creativity Predicts a Longer Life: Scientific American

Creativity Predicts a Longer Life: Scientific American | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Tori Rodirguez

 

"Researchers have long been studying the connection between health and the five major personality traits: agreeableness, extraversion, neuroticism, openness and conscientiousness. A large body of research links neuroticism with poorer health and conscientiousness with superior health. Now openness, which measures cognitive flexibility and the willingness to entertain novel ideas, has emerged as a lifelong protective factor. The linchpin seems to be the creativity associated with the personality trait—creative thinking reduces stress and keeps the brain healthy."

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2 Ways MOOCs Just Became The Schools Of The Future | Edudemic

2 Ways MOOCs Just Became The Schools Of The Future | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Jeff Dunn

 

Udacity course counted for credit by Colorado State University

 

edX partners with Pearson

 

click on image or headline to read more. -JL

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The Sad Reality Of Education Technology | Edudemic

The Sad Reality Of Education Technology | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Fred Sitkins

(link goes toexcerpt from longer article)

 

"If schools see the importance of using technology to learn, then the only real way to accomplish this goal is to provide that technology to all students all the time. We are fooling ourselves if we believe that we can accomplish this goal by sending students to a computer lab a couple days each week or an hour each day for that matter. Until we place technology in the hands of each student, our teaching models won’t change. Our schools still function under the belief that the teacher or the textbook is the keeper of all knowledge and that the teacher’s role is to disseminate that knowledge to their students.

 

"This model is fundamentally flawed because it teaches our students to be passive participants in the learning process. Under this traditional model, students sit and wait for the teacher to provide them with their great knowledge. Our students learn quickly that they don’t really have a role to play in this process other than to wait for someone else to give them information. If they don’t get it, they just wait a little while longer and they will get more information, help, clues, whatever it takes."

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