:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Personalize Learning: Stages of Personalized Learning Environments (Version 2)

Personalize Learning: Stages of Personalized Learning Environments (Version 2) | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"In attempting to transform teaching and learning to personalized learning, consider where you are currently and envision which stage you can see feasible for your school, district or community.

 

"The Stages of Personalized Learning Environments (PLE) Version One chart needed to be updated. Why? Because of the considerable feedback we received after posting our first version of the chart. Some of the feedback was about consistency and flow across the stages. What worked in what stage?

 

"Go to our forum discussion for Connected Educator Month: Stages of Personalized Learning Environments to share your ideas or leave comments below.

 

"We definitely want to thank those that critiqued the stages for us and helped us with this version two. Some districts shared with us that our version one was going to be their foundation of their personalized learning initiative. We wanted to refine it so it was clear, consistent, and easily understood. We went to work to update the stages for them and anyone else moving to a personalized learning environment.

 

"Download the chart below for free: http://eepurl.com/fLJZM"

 

Via Gregg Festa

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Affording the Classroom of the Future -- THE Journal

Affording the Classroom of the Future -- THE Journal | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Bridget McCrea

 

"New technology equipment and tools, state of the art building materials and methods, and experimental teaching practices are all impacting today's K-12 classroom. Districts nationwide are struggling to patch together learning environments that they think represent the future of learning at the elementary, middle school, and high school levels. As they adopt campus-wide IT infrastructures, invest in classroom technology, and test out alternatives to traditional learning spaces, the final results of all this innovation remains to be seen.

 

"To help decipher that code and give principals, administrators, IT directors, and teachers an insider look into what might be coming a few years down the road, THE Journal asked a half a dozen educational experts for their take on three different key concerns: what the classrooms will look like, who will pay for them, and whether we'll ever see them during our lifetimes."

 

This article at least scratches the surface of a discussion about the future of educational facilities and hardware. I'm thinking that a lot of the information here tends to conceive of future settings using today's ideas...and doesn't account for the fact that the landscape will be very different even just 3 or 4 years from now. It would take that much time, at a minimum, to implement these changes, but by then, they will already be out of date. The answer is most elusive. -JL

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Totally Addictive Education: The Future of Learning - Forbes

Totally Addictive Education: The Future of Learning - Forbes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steven Kotler

 

"Today, most educational systems are designed to work from the microscopic to the macroscopic. Students learn facts and figures and tiny fractions of knowledge long before anyone really puts things into a larger context. We assume kids should learn long division before gravitational physics, but this present a problem for macroscopic learners. If we don’t first tell these students about gravitational physics—about what they could do with that long division and why they’re learning it—they literally cannot learn.

 

"Macroscopic learners need context. They need to know the big why before learning the little what. It’s a scaffolding problem. Macroscopic learners need to see the whole X-Mas tree before they start to hang the ornaments. Without this scaffolding, without understanding why they’re learning what they’re learning—aka context—then little makes sense and nothing is retained."

 

I like what Kotler is saying and hope he continues to dig deeper. Could it be that Forbes is beginning to understand the complexity of providng for multiple kinds of learners? -JL

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Tough’s Book Supports Carnegie Work in Productive Persistence | Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

Tough’s Book Supports Carnegie Work in Productive Persistence | Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Carnegie Senior Partner Tom Toch reviews Paul Tough’s book “How Children Succeed” in The Washington Monthly. Toch notes that Tough maintains that “efforts to engender resilience, persistence, and other character strengths in … students” are integral to student success.

 

"This is reinforced in a New York Times book review of the Tough book by Annie Murphy Paul. Paul writes that Tough replaces the assumption “that success today depends primarily on cognitive skills — the kind of intelligence that gets measured on I.Q. tests, including the abilities to recognize letters and words, to calculate, to detect patterns — and that the best way to develop these skills is to practice them as much as possible … with what might be called the character hypothesis: the notion that noncognitive skills, like persistence, self-control, curiosity, conscientiousness, grit and self-confidence, are more crucial than sheer brainpower to achieving success.”

 

"Both the book and Toch’s and Paul’s reviews underscore research by Carnegie Fellow David Yeager that has shown (as Toch notes) “ that even modest interventions, like teachers writing encouraging notes on student’ essays, motivate children to persevere academically.” Yeager’s research is integral to Carnegie’s work in Productive Persistence, one of the key elements of the instructional system in Carnegie’s two mathematics pathways that aim to get students to and through a college credit math course in one year. T

 

"Through a package consisting of targeted student interventions that support faculty to create more engaging classroom environments and organize meaningful instructional experiences for students, our network faculty have strengthened students’ interest in this subject matter, reduced their anxiety about learning math, and convinced many students that they too can actually come to learn this subject. The latter is what we call developing a growth mindset."

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It's Time to Re-Think the U.S. Education System | Harvard Business Review

It's Time to Re-Think the U.S. Education System | Harvard Business Review | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Tammy Erickson

 

"Children today, those born after 1995, are seeing a world that looks substantively different to them than the world did to members of Generation Y during their formative years. In an earlier post, I discussed how the global financial crisis and mobile technology have catalyzed the formation of a new generation. Because this new cohort is concerned about sustainability and living within finite limits, I call them the Re-Generation.

 

"Clearly the experiences these Re-Gens are having in school are also influencing the ideas they're forming. And, although there are some encouraging signs of change, several major challenges stand out from my ongoing discussions with today's 11-13 year olds."

 

Focusing on today's 11-13 year olds;- quite an interesting demographic. -JL

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Job Posting: Program Manager | NJCTL

Job Posting: Program Manager | NJCTL | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The NJ Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) is committed to the mission of dramatically improving student learning in science and mathematics. As schools join us in that effort, we are experiencing dramatic growth in New Jersey, across the United States and around the world. CTL is looking for talented individuals who are interested in joining us in this important work.

 

"We have specific needs for ongoing support for teachers in northern New Jersey; expansion into schools in southern New Jersey; travel throughout the United States; and work in South America and Africa. No single individual could assist us in all those areas. So, we are looking for the person with the strongest background in PSI Physics and the greatest commitment to helping students and teachers."

 

Posting closes Aug. 31, 2012

 

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10 Stunning School Research Projects Being Done Right Now | Edudemic

10 Stunning School Research Projects Being Done Right Now | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Katie Lapi

 

"While of course we here at Online Universities are online education’s biggest fans, there is still something to be said for the magic that happens when a group of bright, inquiring minds come together under one roof. Some of the world’s most incredible research has come and continues to come from traditional colleges and universities in the United States and around the globe. These are some of the most amazing projects going on now."

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The Nation’s Top Educators Awarded at Microsoft Partners in Learning U.S. Forum

The Nation’s Top Educators Awarded at Microsoft Partners in Learning U.S. Forum | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Microsoft Corp. today announced 16 educators from California, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, Texas and Washington have been selected as winners of the Partners in Learning U.S. Forum. The annual event recognizes innovative teachers and school leaders who creatively and effectively use technology in their curriculum to help improve the way kids learn and increase student success. Out of thousands that applied, 100 educators from 25 states attended the event to compete for the opportunity to represent the United States at the Partners in Learning Global Forum this November."

 

The site includes links to all the winning projects as well as the useful judging rubric. This is quite an inspiring event that Microsoft runs. -JL

 

Via Cool Cat Teacher Blog

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Differences between game based learning and educational games | Mobspawner

Differences between game based learning and educational games | Mobspawner | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Dean Groom

Summary by EdSurge

 

"We profiled this Mindshift piece by Mr. Frank Catalano on the difference between games and gamification in EdSurge Innovate Edition 080. If you’ve already nailed the ins and outs of games, simulations, and gamification, level up to this deeper article exploring the differences between educational games and games-based learning.

 

"The author and co-creator of Massively Minecraft, Mr. Dean Groom, warns against handing down requirements to make educational games if they aren’t "in synch with game-culture and evolution." As for games-based learning, he feels it can be accomplished with "imagination, paper, pens, dress-ups, the XBox, Minecraft, and so on." The key is to focus on "how children experience it and what they do with it" -- what some teachers and academicians might call constructivism.

 

"We get the sense that Mr. Catalano’s games are the same as Mr. Grooms educational games -- all one needs to do is remove the educational prefixes that we superficially attach, or as Mr. Groom states, act as "levers and special powers for teachers!" For a great example of game design that heeds Mr. Groom's advice, check out this blog post from the folks at Motion Math on the design of their latest game, Hungry Guppy."

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Father’s Age Linked to Autism and Schizophrenia | NY Times

Father’s Age Linked to Autism and Schizophrenia | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Benedict Carey

 

"Older men are more likely than young ones to father a child who develops autism or schizophrenia, because of random mutations that become more numerous with advancing paternal age, scientists reported on Wednesday, in the first study to quantify the effect as it builds each year. The age of mothers had no bearing on the risk for these disorders, the study found.

 

"Experts said that the finding was hardly reason to forgo fatherhood later in life, though it might have some influence on reproductive decisions. The overall risk to a man in his 40s or older is in the range of 2 percent, at most, and there are other contributing biological factors that are entirely unknown."

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Nearly Half Of Americans 'Very Familiar' With NCLB Say It Worsened Education

Nearly Half Of Americans 'Very Familiar' With NCLB Say It Worsened Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

 

"More Americans think No Child Left Behind has made education in the U.S. worse rather than better, according to results from a Gallup poll released Monday.

 

"Of those surveyed, 29 percent believe the Bush-era education law has worsened education in America, compared with just 16 percent who said it has improved the system. Another 38 percent said NCLB hasn't made much of a difference, while 17 percent are not familiar enough with the policy to rate its effectiveness. Of those who say they are "very familiar" with the law, 28 percent say it has made education better and 48 percent worse."

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Poll: Americans’ views on public education | Washington Post

Poll: Americans’ views on public education | Washington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Valerie Strauss

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"An annual poll on how Americans view public education shows divisions on vouchers, charter schools, evaluating teachers by standardized test scores of students and whether President Obama or Mitt Romney would be better for public education. Yet Americans largely agree that they trust public school teachers but want them prepared more rigorously. As has been true in previous years, Americans give relatively high grades to the public schools in their own communities — this year 48 percent gave them a grade of an A or B, compared to 40 percent in 1992. But they give lower to grades to public schools in the nation as a whole. And a majority of Americans say that young people should be required to stay in school until they are 18 — not 16 or 17, as they are now. These are other issues were part of the 2012 Phi Delta Kappa//Gallup poll of American attitudes toward pubic education, which has been conducted for 44 years."

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Students: What do you think? What would you fix?

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Cal State Goes Online, Slowly | Inside Higher Ed

Cal State Goes Online, Slowly | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Doug Lederman

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"The largest public university system in the United States is finally realizing a vision of a centralized online hub -- but is doing so in a relatively contained way, at least at the start.

"The California State University System is announcing today that Cal State Online will begin offering classes in January, in partnership with Pearson. The 23 campuses in the system have offered virtual courses for years, but unlike numerous other public university systems in the country -- see Penn State World Campus and UMass Online -- Cal State has been slow to coordinate those offerings in a centralized way."

 

Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/fivesilver/141054910/

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Why Apple Will Turn to Holograms | Bloomberg Business Week

Why Apple Will Turn to Holograms | Bloomberg Business Week | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Ben Kunz (August 7, 2012) [before the first decision in the Apple-Samsung suit]

 

"Look around your office hallway or college campus and you’ll see people holding interactive panes of glass. Smartphones and tablets, so revolutionary a few years ago, are quickly becoming commodities. Apple (AAPL) is now locked in a fierce patent battle with Samsung over tablet designs—a sure sign that, whoever is right, touchscreens are converging into gadgets that look like everything else.

 

"So as Apple prepares to launch its next iPhone in September, with a slightly bigger screen, here is a prediction—Apple devices will soon project holograms like you’ve never seen. This is not mere speculation, but insight based on Apple’s patents, recent acquisitions, and the business imperative to do something to break free of the tablet clutter.

 

"In November 2010, Apple patented a three-dimensional display system that would “mimic a hologram” without requiring special glasses. The patent narrative is fascinating, noting that one current market gap in screen technology is the ability of a device to project stereoscopic 3D images to multiple viewers at the same time."

 

Via The Committed Sardine

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Your Clever Password Tricks Aren't Protecting You from Today's Hackers | LifeHacker

Your Clever Password Tricks Aren't Protecting You from Today's Hackers | LifeHacker | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Melanie Pinola

 

"Security breaches happen so often nowadays, you're probably sick of hearing about them and all the ways you should beef up your accounts. Even if you feel you've heard it all already, though, unfortunately, today's password-cracking tools are more advanced and cut through the clever password tricks many of us use. Here's what's changed and what you should do about it. "

 

I've wrestled with this problem for several months now and am prepared to go with an online password manager. I have too many accounts and too limited a personal memory to spend my time trying to memorize a constantly changing array of logins and passwords. Now the challenge is to find a password manager that suits my particular needs: a PC at work, an iPhone, an iPad, and a MacBook Pro. Ohhhhh, this one makes my head hurt. -JL

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The Case for the Private Sector in School Reform | the Atlantic

The Case for the Private Sector in School Reform | the Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Joel Klein

 

"There will always be a need for government to regulate capitalism's excesses and protect the public interest—a role to which I'm deeply committed, having prosecuted several major antitrust cases when I served in the Department of Justice in the 1990s. But to argue that the profit motive somehow disqualifies business from making vast social contributions is more than merely a fallacy. It's to miss the basic economic lesson of the past two centuries—when innovations spawned by the entrepreneurial talent and capital of the private sector have been harnessed for public purposes to become the greatest force for human betterment in the history of the world. "Doing well by doing good" is a cliché for a reason.

"

In education, of course, private firms have always been integral to the daily life of schools. Pencils, paper, blackboards, books, desks, and schools themselves have been built and sold by for-profit companies since the 19th century. Food, janitorial, transportation, and training services have been more recent additions, along with software and computer products as the close of the 20th century.

 

"Thoughtful observers have always understood that when public authorities contract with private firms and oversee their provision of certain products and services, that's a very different thing from "privatization." This only stands to reason, since apart from salaries and benefits for teachers, principals, and other school personnel, virtually every dollar spent on K-12 flows through private firms today."

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Higher Education Reform in Motion | Huffington Post

Higher Education Reform in Motion | Huffington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Ed Crego, George Munoz, and Frank Islam

 

"It's been said that necessity is the mother of invention. As we have shown in our first three posts in this series on higher education, there is much necessity. This necessity has spawned "inventions" and innovations ranging from system changes at the federal, state and local levels to individual initiatives.

 

"In this final post, we provide a Whitman's sampler of some of the approaches that are being discussed or are underway in the areas that we analyzed in our prior posts: costs; graduation and placement rates, return on investment, career education and skill development, teacher preparation; technology and education; and the nation's primary and secondary education system."

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81 Interesting Ways to Use Google Forms in the Classroom

81 Interesting Ways to Use Google Forms in the Classroom | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Compiled by Tom Barrett

 

A crowd-sourced collection of tips and ideas for how to use Google Forms in the classroom. This Google Docs Presentation will continue to grow with additional viewer contributions. -JL

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Ken Morrison's comment, October 1, 2012 11:51 PM
HI Alexis. Thank you for the rescoop. Best of luck to you!
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Starving the Future | NY Times

Starving the Future | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
If you compare investments made in education by the United States with initiatives in China and India, Americans have reason to be afraid, very afraid.

 

By Charles M. Blow

 

"• Half of U.S. children get no early childhood education, and we have no national strategy to increase enrollment.

• More than a quarter of U.S. children have a chronic health condition, such as obesity or asthma, threatening their capacity to learn.

• More than 22 percent of U.S. children lived in poverty in 2010, up from about 17 percent in 2007.

• More than half of U.S. postsecondary students drop out without receiving a degree."

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No Thanks, Bain | Inside Higher Ed

No Thanks, Bain | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kevin Kiley

Commentary by Debbie Morrison

 

"The Bain Report completed in conjunction with University of North Texas, Dallas was not well received by some upon its release. Apparently, the results and recommendations did not sit too well with an advisory panel of faculty and staff at the University, who had some very different views of what a 21st century university would look like. So much so, that there was a call by the university to suppress the results of the report. An interesting read for sure."

 

Bain & Co. joined with U. of North Texas, Dallas to conduct a study on possible directions for the university to move in. Bain made a number of strong recommendations that were not received well by the school's faculty and administration. The story continues to unfold. -JL

 

More info at: http://dallasne.ws/SGu00d

Via Debbie Morrison

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iOS: Importing personal photos and videos from iOS devices to your computer

iOS: Importing personal photos and videos from iOS devices to your computer | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the Apple webiste

 

"On iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, you can capture photos and videos using the built-in camera, or save images from a variety of applications (such as Safari, and Mail) to your device. The following document explains how to import this media content from your device to a computer.".


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How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift

How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Suzie Boss 

Summary by EdSurge

 

"That’s the overarching message in this MindShift guide to turning your classroom into an idea factory. Policy-makers and budget wonks tussle over how to usher in the next era of K-12 education. That leaves teachers (and parents) the only remaining parties capable of affecting students right now. The article highlights eight tips from teachers who are already transforming classroom practices through project-based learning activities. A certain edsurgent design-thinker is really excited by Tip #4: Build Empathy. We imagine Mr. Ferriter would be excited about Tip #6: Amplify Worthy Ideas and Tip #8: Encourage Breakthroughs (see Motivation Optional) when you consider all the ways to share, tweet, pin, remix, and crowdfund ideas."

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Gallery of Master's Projects | Learning, Design and Technology - Stanford University

Gallery of Master's Projects | Learning, Design and Technology - Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The Master's Project is an opportunity for LDT students to further develop and apply their learning. Through a learner-centered design process, students identify learning problems and apply appropriate theories about learning to create educationally informed and empirically grounded learning environments, products, and programs that effectively employ emergent technologies in variety of settings."

 

This site archives all of the MA projects from a hihgly innovative program at Stanford. The projects themselves are fascinating to study and try out. -JL

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Special Needs Kids Staying in Traditional Schools | ABC News-Associated Press

Special Needs Kids Staying in Traditional Schools | ABC News-Associated Press | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Christina Hoag

Summary by Accomplished Teacher

 

"Traditional public schools are educating a higher proportion of students with special needs, shouldering a higher financial burden at a time when their budgets already are strained. Charter, parochial and magnet schools often serve students with milder disabilities, while traditional schools serve those whose disabilities are more severe. "It raises an ethical responsibility question," said Eric Gordon, CEO of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. "We welcome our students with special needs, but the most expensive programming is on public districts."

 

This is an important trend. -JL

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Online Teacher Education Programs Growing - And So Do Doubts | Education News

Online Teacher Education Programs Growing - And So Do Doubts | Education News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Julia Lawrence

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"Online teacher education programs have taken off in a big way, recently hitting a milestone that has them outnumbering teacher certification courses offered in a traditional academic setting. USA Today analyzed data collected by the U.S. Department of Education, and credits the growth to four universities operating mainly over the internet – three of them for-profit. These schools gave out nearly one in every 16 bachelor’s degrees in education last year and nearly one in eleven postgraduate degrees, which included master’s degrees and doctorates."

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