:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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iOS: Importing personal photos and videos from iOS devices to your computer

iOS: Importing personal photos and videos from iOS devices to your computer | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the Apple webiste

 

"On iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, you can capture photos and videos using the built-in camera, or save images from a variety of applications (such as Safari, and Mail) to your device. The following document explains how to import this media content from your device to a computer.".


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How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift

How to Turn Your Classroom into an Idea Factory | Mind/Shift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Suzie Boss 

Summary by EdSurge

 

"That’s the overarching message in this MindShift guide to turning your classroom into an idea factory. Policy-makers and budget wonks tussle over how to usher in the next era of K-12 education. That leaves teachers (and parents) the only remaining parties capable of affecting students right now. The article highlights eight tips from teachers who are already transforming classroom practices through project-based learning activities. A certain edsurgent design-thinker is really excited by Tip #4: Build Empathy. We imagine Mr. Ferriter would be excited about Tip #6: Amplify Worthy Ideas and Tip #8: Encourage Breakthroughs (see Motivation Optional) when you consider all the ways to share, tweet, pin, remix, and crowdfund ideas."

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Gallery of Master's Projects | Learning, Design and Technology - Stanford University

Gallery of Master's Projects | Learning, Design and Technology - Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The Master's Project is an opportunity for LDT students to further develop and apply their learning. Through a learner-centered design process, students identify learning problems and apply appropriate theories about learning to create educationally informed and empirically grounded learning environments, products, and programs that effectively employ emergent technologies in variety of settings."

 

This site archives all of the MA projects from a hihgly innovative program at Stanford. The projects themselves are fascinating to study and try out. -JL

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Special Needs Kids Staying in Traditional Schools | ABC News-Associated Press

Special Needs Kids Staying in Traditional Schools | ABC News-Associated Press | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Christina Hoag

Summary by Accomplished Teacher

 

"Traditional public schools are educating a higher proportion of students with special needs, shouldering a higher financial burden at a time when their budgets already are strained. Charter, parochial and magnet schools often serve students with milder disabilities, while traditional schools serve those whose disabilities are more severe. "It raises an ethical responsibility question," said Eric Gordon, CEO of the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. "We welcome our students with special needs, but the most expensive programming is on public districts."

 

This is an important trend. -JL

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Online Teacher Education Programs Growing - And So Do Doubts | Education News

Online Teacher Education Programs Growing - And So Do Doubts | Education News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Julia Lawrence

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"Online teacher education programs have taken off in a big way, recently hitting a milestone that has them outnumbering teacher certification courses offered in a traditional academic setting. USA Today analyzed data collected by the U.S. Department of Education, and credits the growth to four universities operating mainly over the internet – three of them for-profit. These schools gave out nearly one in every 16 bachelor’s degrees in education last year and nearly one in eleven postgraduate degrees, which included master’s degrees and doctorates."

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10 Real-World BYOD Classrooms (And Whether It’s Worked Or Not) | Edudemic

10 Real-World BYOD Classrooms (And Whether It’s Worked Or Not) | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Katie Lapi

 

"With budgets tight, many schools are hoping to bring technology into the classroom without having to shell out for a device for each student. A solution for many has been to make classes BYOD (short for “bring your own device”), which allows students to bring laptops, tablets, and smartphonesfrom home and to use them in the classroom and share them with other students.

 

"It’s a promising idea, especially for schools that don’t have big tech budgets, but it has met with some criticism from those who don’t think that it’s a viable long-term or truly budget-conscious decision.

 

"Whether that’s the case is yet to be seen, but these stories of schools that have tried out BYOD programs seem to be largely positive, allowing educators and students to embrace technology in learning regardless of the limited resources they may have at hand."

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The 22nd Century at First Light: Envisioning Life in the Year 2100 | World Future Society

The 22nd Century at First Light: Envisioning Life in the Year 2100 | World Future Society | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

WFS asked its membership to think about the dawn of the 22nd century. Twenty-nine articles are collected here. -JL

 

From the website

 

"A child born today will only be 88 years old in the year 2100. It’s time to start thinking and caring about the twenty-second century now.

 

"The next 88 years may see changes that come exponentially faster than the previous 88 years. What new inventions will come out of nowhere and change everything? What will our families look like? How will we govern ourselves? What new crimes or other threats loom ahead? Will we be happy? How?

 

"THE FUTURIST invited WFS members and friends to submit forecasts, scenarios, wild cards, dreams, and nightmares about the earth, humanity, governance, commerce, science and technology, and more.

 

"So, what do we see in this “first light” view over the next horizon? A fuzzy and inaccurate picture, no doubt, but also an earnest attempt to shake out our futuring instruments and begin improving them. To build a better future for the generations who are depending on us, we’ll need the best tools we can develop."

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An Unexpected Ass Kicking | Blog Of Impossible Things

An Unexpected Ass Kicking | Blog Of Impossible Things | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Joel Runyon

 

A fellow is working at his computer in a coffee shop and an elderly man engages him in conversation. Remarkable revelations ensue.

This is pleasant and important reading. -JL

 

(Be sure to click the followup link at the top of the article AFTER you've read it through.)

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Why Hasn't the Harlem Children's Zone Been Replicated Even Without Obama's Help?

Why Hasn't the Harlem Children's Zone Been Replicated Even Without Obama's Help? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Published in The Atlantic

By Amanda Erickson

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"Why are so many cities waiting on federal funds to give a program like the Harlem Children’s Zone a try? The Zone is widely heralded as one of the most successful anti-poverty programs in the country, an honor it managed to achieve without the help of federal money. In fact, it started with a budget of just $6 million (slated to grow to $46 million over ten years). Additionally, much of the funding was private - about a third of the Zone's money comes directly from board members. The rest comes from foundations, private donors and government."

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Nearly Half the Teachers in New York City Are Denied Tenure in 2012 | NY Times

Nearly Half the Teachers in New York City Are Denied Tenure in 2012 | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Al Baker

Summary by Accomplished Teacher

 

"Changes to the ways in which New York City teachers are awarded tenure has resulted in fewer teachers earning it. Recent data show that in 2012, 55% of eligible teachers earned tenure after three years of service -- down from 97% who did so in 2007. New York City's policy shift is part of a national trend, with 18 state legislatures addressing teacher tenure in 2011"

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In 1995, prophetic fifth graders predict Internet of the future | LA Tiames

In 1995, prophetic fifth graders predict Internet of the future | LA Tiames | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Deborah Netburn

Summary by SmartBrief on EdTech

 

"A video made in 1995 in which fifth-grade students, led by their teacher, Cindy Gaffney, encourage peers to use the Internet now has gone viral. The video, "Prophetic 1995 Student Internet PSA," is available on YouTube, and has been viewed about 1 million times. In the video, students discuss the ways in which they can use the Internet in 1995 and their -- stunningly accurate -- predictions for how the Internet would be used in the future. Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model)"

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Making Knowledge Count | Sunday Posts

Making Knowledge Count | Sunday Posts | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Supriyo Chaudhuri

 

"Yesterday, for me, was a day of fascinating conversations, particularly on the state of Higher Education in India. This is with two senior executives from an Indian Higher Education institution. We talked about a number of things, including the changing mindset in India and the the regulatory regime, as well as the possibilities, and pitfalls, of collaborating with British and American institutions. For me, forever an enthusiast of global education, it was insightful, if dispiriting, discussion. Importantly, it gave me yet again a clear sense of the private higher education space in India. We agreed on most things, except one perhaps, and that is the role and importance of knowledge in Higher Education.

 

"The Indian Educators were quite clear: Knowledge is no longer important. Commercially, they did not think it made sense, as the students don't care about knowledge: They want the degree, as easily as they can. The parents don't care what the students are learning, they said, as long as they get a job. On another level, they highlighted the importance of attitude, the commitment to work, adaptability and even spirituality, over knowledge."

 

Fascinating consideration of the usefulness vs. knowledge debate also being waged in U.S. higher ed, and I think, among higher ed (and many secondary ed) folks in most developed and emerging nations. As publicly-financed higher education continues to suffer declining support, the mindset of those in private institutions assumes rising dominance - JL

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Charter school group's chief blamed for 2010 cheating scandal | LA Times

Charter school group's chief blamed for 2010 cheating scandal | LA Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Howard Blume

 

"The meeting at Crescendo Preparatory South was progressing as usual when the acting principal dropped a bombshell: She had been given copies of the upcoming standardized tests. The teachers were to study them, take notes — and make sure the kids got it.

 

"Some of the eight instructors were troubled by what seemed to be an order to cheat. One burst into tears.

 

"So began one of the most brazen cheating scandals in the nation. Ultimately, all of Crescendo's schools in South Los Angeles, Gardena and Hawthorne were shut down, its teachers let go and 1,400 students forced to find new schools.

 

"Only the rough outlines of the 2010 scandal were made public, but dozens of interviews with former Crescendo employees and officials — as well as a review of previously unreleased documents — portray an environment so poisoned by demands to excel on state proficiency tests that many submitted to a plan to boost the scores of schools that were already doing well."

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Differences between game based learning and educational games | Mobspawner

Differences between game based learning and educational games | Mobspawner | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Dean Groom

Summary by EdSurge

 

"We profiled this Mindshift piece by Mr. Frank Catalano on the difference between games and gamification in EdSurge Innovate Edition 080. If you’ve already nailed the ins and outs of games, simulations, and gamification, level up to this deeper article exploring the differences between educational games and games-based learning.

 

"The author and co-creator of Massively Minecraft, Mr. Dean Groom, warns against handing down requirements to make educational games if they aren’t "in synch with game-culture and evolution." As for games-based learning, he feels it can be accomplished with "imagination, paper, pens, dress-ups, the XBox, Minecraft, and so on." The key is to focus on "how children experience it and what they do with it" -- what some teachers and academicians might call constructivism.

 

"We get the sense that Mr. Catalano’s games are the same as Mr. Grooms educational games -- all one needs to do is remove the educational prefixes that we superficially attach, or as Mr. Groom states, act as "levers and special powers for teachers!" For a great example of game design that heeds Mr. Groom's advice, check out this blog post from the folks at Motion Math on the design of their latest game, Hungry Guppy."

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Father’s Age Linked to Autism and Schizophrenia | NY Times

Father’s Age Linked to Autism and Schizophrenia | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Benedict Carey

 

"Older men are more likely than young ones to father a child who develops autism or schizophrenia, because of random mutations that become more numerous with advancing paternal age, scientists reported on Wednesday, in the first study to quantify the effect as it builds each year. The age of mothers had no bearing on the risk for these disorders, the study found.

 

"Experts said that the finding was hardly reason to forgo fatherhood later in life, though it might have some influence on reproductive decisions. The overall risk to a man in his 40s or older is in the range of 2 percent, at most, and there are other contributing biological factors that are entirely unknown."

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Nearly Half Of Americans 'Very Familiar' With NCLB Say It Worsened Education

Nearly Half Of Americans 'Very Familiar' With NCLB Say It Worsened Education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

 

"More Americans think No Child Left Behind has made education in the U.S. worse rather than better, according to results from a Gallup poll released Monday.

 

"Of those surveyed, 29 percent believe the Bush-era education law has worsened education in America, compared with just 16 percent who said it has improved the system. Another 38 percent said NCLB hasn't made much of a difference, while 17 percent are not familiar enough with the policy to rate its effectiveness. Of those who say they are "very familiar" with the law, 28 percent say it has made education better and 48 percent worse."

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Poll: Americans’ views on public education | Washington Post

Poll: Americans’ views on public education | Washington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Valerie Strauss

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"An annual poll on how Americans view public education shows divisions on vouchers, charter schools, evaluating teachers by standardized test scores of students and whether President Obama or Mitt Romney would be better for public education. Yet Americans largely agree that they trust public school teachers but want them prepared more rigorously. As has been true in previous years, Americans give relatively high grades to the public schools in their own communities — this year 48 percent gave them a grade of an A or B, compared to 40 percent in 1992. But they give lower to grades to public schools in the nation as a whole. And a majority of Americans say that young people should be required to stay in school until they are 18 — not 16 or 17, as they are now. These are other issues were part of the 2012 Phi Delta Kappa//Gallup poll of American attitudes toward pubic education, which has been conducted for 44 years."

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Students: What do you think? What would you fix?

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Cal State Goes Online, Slowly | Inside Higher Ed

Cal State Goes Online, Slowly | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Doug Lederman

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"The largest public university system in the United States is finally realizing a vision of a centralized online hub -- but is doing so in a relatively contained way, at least at the start.

"The California State University System is announcing today that Cal State Online will begin offering classes in January, in partnership with Pearson. The 23 campuses in the system have offered virtual courses for years, but unlike numerous other public university systems in the country -- see Penn State World Campus and UMass Online -- Cal State has been slow to coordinate those offerings in a centralized way."

 

Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/fivesilver/141054910/

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Supporting workplace learning | Harold Jarche

Supporting workplace learning | Harold Jarche | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"It takes much more than courses delivered through a learning management system to support workplace learning in the network era.

 

"The basic building block, in my experience, is personal knowledge management. People who can seek new information, make sense of it, and share it with their colleagues, will be an asset to any work team. However, they need access to their learning networks while at work, and this is often a challenge. Reduce these barriers, and support PKM practices, and the organization will benefit."

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News and Updates | SXSWedu.com

News and Updates | SXSWedu.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by EdSurge Newsletter

 

"WANT TO GO TO SXSW-EDU? DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 7: Get your braincells going: SXSWedu is seeking great education-related talk or panel suggestions. Yep, the shindig will take place next March but you've got to get in your bid now to be a speaker or on a panel. We loved the Austin scene last year. Check out all the details here. Happily, if you or your panel is selected, you get free admission into SXSWedu."

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Discovery Invests in Digital Textbooks in Hopes of Growth | NY Times

Discovery Invests in Digital Textbooks in Hopes of Growth | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Dennis Brooks and Amy Chozick

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"Conventional textbooks for kindergarten through 12th grade are a $3 billion business in the United States, according to the Association of American Publishers, with an additional $4 billion spent on teacher guides, testing resources and reference materials. And almost all that printed material, educators say, will eventually be replaced by digital versions. "

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Why Hasn't the Harlem Children's Zone Been Replicated Even Without Obama's Help?

Why Hasn't the Harlem Children's Zone Been Replicated Even Without Obama's Help? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Published by The Atlantic

By Amanda Erickson

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"Why are so many cities waiting on federal funds to give a program like the Harlem Children’s Zone a try? The Zone is widely heralded as one of the most successful anti-poverty programs in the country, an honor it managed to achieve without the help of federal money. In fact, it started with a budget of just $6 million (slated to grow to $46 million over ten years). Additionally, much of the funding was private - about a third of the Zone's money comes directly from board members. The rest comes from foundations, private donors and government. "

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Videos of Top Teachers Explaining Their Craft | NY Times

Videos of Top Teachers Explaining Their Craft | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Motoko Rich

 

"As much as showing the content of the classes, the videos help teachers identify techniques for organizing a lesson or eliciting sophisticated questions from students...."

 

"The District of Columbia is not the only public school district or educational organization that is using video for the professional development of teachers. Teaching Channel, a nonprofit, has amassed more than 500 videos of teachers who are recommended by school districts, teaching organizations and a panel of advisers."

 

"Uncommon Schools, which runs 32 schools, mostly in Brooklyn and Newark, show videos like these during teacher training.

A YouTube video shows Juliana Worrell, a first-grade teacher, with her students at North Star Academy Vailsburg Elementary School."

 

A small, but high quality, selection of teacher videos, with links to sources for more. -JL

 

Via Accomplished Teacher

 

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New Report Puts in Perspective “21st Century Skills” and Other Education Terms

New Report Puts in Perspective “21st Century Skills” and Other Education Terms | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"According to the educational buzz, students need to be experiencing 'next-generation learning' or 'deeper learning' and acquiring 'new basic skills' or '21st-century skills'—and that’s just not happening on any type of consistent, systematic basis in K-12 classrooms. But what do those terms actually mean? What is the proof that focusing on these supposedly new skill sets will actually lead to success in life? And, if these terms are important, how do we transform our schools, from top to bottom, to focus more closely on turning them into something substantive and applicable to higher education or future work places?"


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New Apple Store “prototype” in Palo Alto has massive bandwidth for live video | VentureBeat

New Apple Store “prototype” in Palo Alto has massive bandwidth for live video | VentureBeat | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Dylan Tweney

 

"Why would Apple need such high-bandwidth neighbors for its “prototype” store? Well, one explanation is that it wants to give the best possible showing to new video services, such as a revamped Apple TV. The company was recently reported to be negotiating with cable companies to offer them an Apple-made set-top box that would work with cable services, and it’s reportedly building a Apple TV that will blur the distinction between live and on-demand video."

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