:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Will The New York Times Redesign Lead To A New Web Standard? | Fast Company

Will The New York Times Redesign Lead To A New Web Standard? | Fast Company | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Mark Wilson

 

"The latest conversation in web design has been, how do we reimagine the web for a mobile device? Do you design your mobile site first, then supersize it for PCs? Or do you wrap all that content in an app and bring special functionality to tablets?

 

For most websites, it’s an ongoing debate between aesthetics and user experience. But for the New York Times, the stakes are much higher. The way a story is consumed is intrinsic to its meaning--even its perceived veracity.

 

“We want to make sure we’re shaping our journalism in a way that does not reflect a bias to a particular medium or format,” Ian Adelman tells Co.Design. He’s the director of digital design at the NYT. And his team has recently announced its first major redesign since 2006--a responsive site that offers a unified, airier experience across platforms."

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Start-up of You, Visual Summary

By Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn: "In commemoration of a year in print, we present the Startup of You in visual summary. The last year has continued to demonstrate how work and careers need a new entrepreneurial mindset for everyone, not just entrepreneurs."


Via Guillaume Decugis
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ANCIL - A New Curriculum for Information Literacy

A revolutionary new Information Literacy curriculum for Higher Education institutions in a digital age.

Via John Shank, Dr. Laura Sheneman, Dennis T OConnor
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Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian's curator insight, March 8, 2013 11:47 AM

Teaching information literacy is the purvue of all educators.

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, March 12, 2013 3:43 AM

This applies to all educational settings, not just universities.

Sue Hickson's curator insight, March 14, 2013 7:50 PM

A strategic focus on information literacy teaching that involves collaboration in the teaching of info skills, from educational designers, academics, IT staff and librarians. Needs buy in from the academic community which is not always easy to get.

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How Writing and the Printed Word Rewired Our Brains | tech graffiti

How Writing and the Printed Word Rewired Our Brains | tech graffiti | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Yvonne McArthur

 

"The written word can seem a little old hat compared to the wonders of the digital world, but it was truly revolutionary. In fact, access to writing and books not only completely altered the world we live in, but changed the way we think and perceive. In his book The Hidden Power of Electronic Culture, pastor and former adman Shane Hipps mentions four ways in which writing rewired our brains. Print and access to books made us more individualistic, more capable of abstract thought, more objective, and more linear in our thinking. Read on to find out how.?

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 12, 2013 7:16 PM

This is important in the digital world. Print and written materials have a role in the development of our brains. Nicholas Carr described how a typewriter changed the sound of Nietszche's writing.

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Flip of a single molecular switch makes an old brain young | KurzweilAI

Flip of a single molecular switch makes an old brain young | KurzweilAI | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The flip of a single molecular switch helps create the mature neuronal connections that allow the brain to bridge the gap between adolescent impressionability and adult stability.

 

"Now Yale School of Medicine researchers have reversed the process, recreating a youthful brain that facilitated both learning and healing in the adult mouse.

 

"Scientists have long known that the young and old brains are very different. Adolescent brains are more malleable or plastic, which allows them to learn languages more quickly than adults and speeds recovery from brain injuries. The comparative rigidity of the adult brain results in part from the function of a single gene that slows the rapid change in synaptic connections between neurons.

 

"By monitoring the synapses in living mice over weeks and months, Yale researchers have identified the key genetic switch for brain maturation: the Nogo Receptor 1 gene is required to suppress high levels of plasticity in the adolescent brain and create the relatively quiescent levels of plasticity in adulthood."

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#SXSWedu: 5 Tips for Education Technology Startups | Publishing ...

#SXSWedu: 5 Tips for Education Technology Startups | Publishing ... | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The growing field of education technology was on display at this year's SXSWedu conference in Austin. Here are some tips for entrepreneurs who want to break into the market.

Via Jon Samuelson, Stephanie Sandifer
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Group work advice for MOOC providers - by George Siemens

Group work advice for MOOC providers - by George Siemens | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The most valuable aspect of MOOCs is that the large number of learners enables the formation of sub-networks based on interested, geography, language, or some other attribute that draws individuals together. With 20 students in a class, limited options exist for forming sub-networks. When you have 5,000 students, new configurations are possible.

 

"The “new pedagogical models” (A Silicon Valley term meaning: we didn’t read the literature and still don’t realize that these findings are two, three, or more decades old) being discovered by MOOC providers supports what most academics and experienced teachers know about learning: it’s a social, active, and participatory process.

 

"The current MOOC providers have adopted a regressive pedagogy: small scale learning chunks reminiscent of the the heady days of cognitivism and military training. Ah, the 1960′s. What a great time to be a learner.

In order to move past this small chunk model of learning, MOOC providers will need to include problem based learning and group learning in their offerings. That won’t be easy. MOOCs have high dropout rates. Which means that if you’re assigned to a group of 10 learners, by the end of the course, you’ll be the only one left.

 

"The large MOOCs can improve the quality of learning by creating a model for rapid creation/dissolution of groups. If you have teenagers in your house (or if you are a gamer), you’re likely familiar with how groups form in many video games or virtual worlds. There are two extreme opposites: World of Warcraft involves highly cohesive social units where individuals spend long periods of time together in solving problems and engaging in quests. In contrast, Call of Duty has low social cohesion as groups are formed on the spot and once a player logs off, the group dissolve (yes, you can log in and play with friends in a more cohesive unit on CoD as well). The latter model is worth considering for MOOCs."


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Jim Lerman's insight:

Quite an important article for those considering the design of MOOCs.

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Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, March 11, 2013 11:58 AM
Absolutely Jim!
Mark Gillingham's curator insight, March 12, 2013 3:56 PM

Thinking of using a MOOC for your students or yourself? Think about the limitations that are usual but not necessarily forced in the typical MOOC and break into groups. Although many drop out of MOOCs, many do because they didn't find a suitable group or didn't think to look for one. 

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Testing Resistance & Reform News: February 28 - March 6, 2013 | FairTest

Testing Resistance & Reform News: February 28 - March 6, 2013 | FairTest | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Links to 9 articles that appeared in the past week.

Jim Lerman's insight:

March (Testing) Madness Takes Over Schools
   http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/cmts_capt_begin/id_55546

 

Seattle Teachers Stoke National Debate About Standardized Tests
   http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/03/us-usa-education-testing-idUSBRE92207B20130303?feedType=RSS&feedName=domesticNews

Boycott Gains Voice in Legislature with Bill to Report Costs of Testing
   http://blogs.seattleweekly.com/dailyweekly/2013/03/anti-testing_movement_gains_vo.php

Colorado Students Plan March 14 Walk Out to Protest High-Stakes Exams
   http://www.students4ourschools.org/calender-and-events.html

Standardized Testing Becomes the Great Divide in School Policy
    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-teachers-testing-20130304,0,4686481.story

High-Stakes Testing Threatens Civil Rights by Widening Racial Gaps
   http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/article/20130228/OPINION01/302280017/Editorial-High-stakes-testing-civil-rights-issue

Testing, Other Policy Trends De-Professionalize Teaching
   http://nepc.colorado.edu/publication/policy-reforms-deprofessionalization

Florida Bill Would Delay Common Core Assessments Until New Exams Meet the Test
   http://stateimpact.npr.org/florida/2013/03/04/bill-would-delay-next-generation-test-until-schools-have-technology-ready/

Five Things to Know About the SAT: Old or "New"
   http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/answer-sheet/wp/2013/03/01/five-things-to-know-about-the-sat/

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The Arcane Rules That Keep Low-Income Kids Out of College | The Atlantic

The Arcane Rules That Keep Low-Income Kids Out of College | The Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
The labyrinth surrounding scholarships and admissions doesn't account for the messy realities of poor families' lives.
Jim Lerman's insight:

Excellent article

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Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Brown’s wireless BCI, fashioned out of hermetically sealed titanium, looks a lot like a pacemaker. Inside there’s a li-ion battery, an inductive (wireless) charging loop, a chip that digitizes the signals from your brain, and an antenna for transmitting those neural spikes to a nearby computer. The BCI is connected to a small chip with 100 electrodes protruding from it, which, in this study, was embedded in the somatosensory cortex or motor cortex. These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away. The BCI’s battery takes two hours to charge via wireless inductive charging, and then has enough juice to last for six hours of use.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Amy Cross
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Nacho Vega's curator insight, March 5, 2013 5:10 AM

Where do we go?!!!

Gust MEES's curator insight, March 5, 2013 4:17 PM

 

These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away.

 

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zSpace - a virtual-holographic experience

Infinite Z, Inc.® is a digital design technology provider that enables natural interaction with virtual-holographic 3D imagery to bring designs to life. The ...

Via Mohamed M Dawod, Amy Cross
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Personalized Learning

Personalized Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

David Freeburg asked a question about resoureces on Personalized Learning in Google+. The responses are yielding quite a collection of resources for those interested in the topic. -JL

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Dr. James "Buster" Brown Centennial Celebration

"On his centennial weekend, we gather to celebrate his soaring spirit of love and generosity and the artful mastery of his chosen means of expression…tap dance. We rejoice in the teaching and re-creation of some of his most famous dance pieces, immerse ourselves in films of his work and discussions of his importance, and bring it home to party at Swing 46, site of one of his most enduring and endearing creations, the Buster Brown Tap Jam. This will be a weekend packed with memories to last a lifetime."x

Jim Lerman's insight:

I know there are some tap dance fans and supporters out there!

 

My daughter, Michela, was a close protege of Buster Brown's, and our whole family were close friends with him.

 

We are so happy and proud that Michela is organizing a centennial celebration for Buster, one of one of the great human beings, and performers, of the 20th century. Joining with her in this effort are Tony Waag and the American Tap Dance Foundation.

 

Please watch this video and consider donating to the Kickstarter campaign in support of this wonderful event. Any amount will be greatly appreciated.

 

And if you can, please share this post with all in your social network.

 

Finally, of course, please consider attending what will be a wonderful weekend.

 

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How many colleges and universities let high schoolers take classes?

How many colleges and universities let high schoolers take classes? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
A new NCES report on dual enrollment has some answers that may surprise you.
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Libraries and Makerspaces: a match made in heaven

Libraries and Makerspaces: a match made in heaven | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Every discussion of libraries in the age of austerity always includes at least one blowhard who opines, "What do we need libraries for? We've got the Internet now!"

 

The problem is that Mr. Blowhard has confused a library with a book depository. Now, those are useful, too, but a library isn't just (or even necessarily) a place where you go to get books for free. Public libraries have always been places where skilled information professionals assisted the general public with the eternal quest to understand the world. Historically, librarians have sat at the coalface between the entire universe of published material and patrons, choosing books with at least a colorable claim to credibility, carefully cataloging and shelving them, and then assisting patrons in understanding how to synthesize the material contained therein.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's comment, February 26, 2013 3:07 AM
Nice piece, those who don't understand what libraries are about should read this!
GwynethJones's curator insight, February 26, 2013 11:39 AM
Libraries & Makerspaces: a Match made in Heaven -- LOVE this Best Practice! #TLChat
Susan Schatvet's curator insight, March 13, 2013 11:00 AM

Libraries on the forefront of revitalizing the American Dream

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The Future of Data Visualization Tools

The Future of Data Visualization Tools | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Data is everywhere and well-designed data graphics can be both beautiful and meaningful. As visualizations take center stage in a data-centric world, researchers and developers spend much time understanding and creating better visualizations. But they spend just as much time understanding how tools can help programmers and designers create visualizations faster, more effectively, and more enjoyably.

 

As any visualization practitioner will tell you, turning a dataset from raw stuff in a file to a final result in a picture is far from a single-track, linear path. Rather, there is a constant iteration of competing designs, tweaking and evaluating at once their pros and cons. The visualization research community has recognized the importance of keeping track of this process.

 

Read the complete article to learn more about the future of the practice and the tools that enable designers to create thoughtful infographics and visualizations...


Via Lauren Moss
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Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school.


Via Andrea Zeitz
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Emerging Student Patterns in MOOCs: A (Revised) Graphical View -

Emerging Student Patterns in MOOCs: A (Revised) Graphical View - | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Paulo Moekotte's comment, March 12, 2013 2:24 PM
Dear Ana,

I guess you've already put considerable time in your categorization of student behaviour patterns in MOOCs. But I would still like to point you to a framework that might be appropriate and fit your questions and research data.

The 'Reader-to-Leader' framework is developed by Jennifer Preece and Ben Shneiderman (The Reader-to-Leader Framework: Motivating Technology-Mediated Social Participation).
As the authors indicate. it might be used in several disciplines and domains. So education (especially tailored from a social-constructivist perspective) could also benefit from the insights this framework can support.
Will Stewart's curator insight, March 14, 2013 7:12 AM

These kinds of studies are important as the design and delivery of MOOCs evolve.

Ana Cristina Pratas's comment, July 14, 2013 8:06 PM
Thank you Paulo for your time and recommendation; my sincere apologies for such a late response!
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Smart, Poor Kids Are Applying to the Wrong Colleges | Slate

Smart, Poor Kids Are Applying to the Wrong Colleges | Slate | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Matthew Yglesias

 

"Each year, middle-class American high-school seniors with good grades go through a familiar ritual of the college application process. They file a bunch of applications—perhaps after visiting several schools—submitting test scores, grades, essays, and letters of recommendation. They apply to a “reach” school or two and a “safety” school or two along with some in the middle. The idea is to see where you can get in and then decide where you want to go after researching both the quality of the schools on offer and the actual financial cost of attending. It’s a system that’s a bit stressful and annoying, but it basically works. Students get matched with schools that roughly suit their level of academic preparation and people have a chance to shop around a bit for the myriad forms of financial aid that make college attendance feasible.

 

"But it doesn’t work for poor kids. It turns out that over and above all the other disadvantages one faces growing up poor in America, the majority of high-achieving kids from low-income backgrounds fail to apply to any selective colleges."

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Caleb 's curator insight, March 20, 2013 2:26 PM

My Thoughts:

This article is about how many smart, poor students don't apply to colleges that they could get into and that could give them a better education and future. This effects me because I am a smart, poor student as well and it shows me that it is true, because I won't apply to colleges that I could from growing up poor and not ever having the oportunity to go and learn in a very great school. It doesn't help that I've never really had a want to learn but recently I have gained the want to learn and I beleive that it would be too late for me to get into a college that would get me further in my future, so I apply for colleges that I can get to easly and be able to pay for them.

Alec Anderson's curator insight, December 14, 2014 11:48 PM

This article talks about how the smart but kids with little to no money to pay for college are applying themselves to colleges that they can't afford. If they don't get any financial help and they get accepted to a college that is a lot of money then how do they afford to pay if off later. That is why these kids should apply to colleges where they know that they can get a good college education while still paying less money. Besides that they should be looking for scholarships and financial aid so that they aren't stressing over not being able to pay off all their student debt when they get out of college.

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Adaptability to Online Learning: Differences Across Types of Students and Academic Subject Areas

CCRC conducts research on community colleges and contributes to the development of practice and policy to promote success for all higher education students.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Tom Perran's curator insight, March 10, 2013 10:07 AM

Using a dataset containing nearly 500,000 courses taken by over 40,000 community and technical college students in Washington State, this study examines how well students adapt to the online environment in terms of their ability to persist and earn strong grades in online courses relative to their ability to do so in face-to-face courses.

Gust MEES's curator insight, March 10, 2013 4:48 PM

 

Check it out and learn more...

 

ThePinkSalmon's comment, March 16, 2013 3:48 AM
A really interesting research to learn more, many thanks
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Wall of Films! | Over 500 Social Change Documentaries on 1 Page

Wall of Films! | Over 500 Social Change Documentaries on 1 Page | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Films For Action is a community-powered alternative news center and learning library for people who want to change the world

 

"At an International Level:
Films For Action uses the power of film to raise awareness of important social, environmental, and media-related issues not covered by the mainstream news. Our goal is to provide citizens with the information and perspectives essential to creating a more just, sustainable, and democratic society.

Our website has cataloged over 900 of the best films and videos that can be watched free online.

"At the Local Level:
On the ground, our City Chapters are working to create alternative media channels that will inform, connect, and inspire action at a community level."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Be wise and preview these films before having students view them.

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Alison Hewett's curator insight, April 12, 2014 9:32 PM

This is great and something I didn't previously know about. Good resource when looking at both sides of a debate.

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Sugata Mitra: Build a School in the Cloud | Video on TED.com

Onstage at TED2013, Sugata Mitra makes his bold TED Prize wish: Help me design the School in the Cloud, a learning lab in India, where children can explore and learn from each other -- using resources and mentoring from the cloud.

Via adpcenter
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Cisco Virtual Forum for Education Leaders

Cisco Virtual Forum for Education Leaders | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Cisco is proud to convene this year’s online Forum of extraordinarily talented education leaders who are transforming education today. March 19/20 2013 


Via Anna Hu , Amy Cross
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This game is a movie: 'New Cinema' explores the altered future of film

This game is a movie: 'New Cinema' explores the altered future of film | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Peter Jackson's high frame rate Hobbit and the second coming of 3D have probably been the most publicized attempts to revive the stagnating movie industry. But elsewhere, the future of cinema seems to be converging on something more closely resembling a video game as artists, hackers, and filmmakers process the language of film through the lens of code.


Via Amy Cross
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Imagination: Creating the Future of Education and Work

Imagination: Creating the Future of Education and Work | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Americans are currently faced with a shortage of jobs, but by 2018 the nation will be faced with a shortage of educated workers. This project began in Louisiana, where 100,000 skilled labor jobs are currently unfilled. If the future workforce continues to be trained for the past, particularly as other countries look ahead, Americans will no longer be globally competitive as the domestic economy and infrastructure continue to collapse.

 

"Can that be prevented, and if so, how? With the industrial era crumbling behind us and technological developments rapidly accelerating toward a hybrid reality that still hasn’t fully manifested, the co-directors of this project, Rita J. King and Joshua Fouts, call this fleeting period between the two longer eras the “Imagination Age,” a time during which humanity must imagine and then create, together, the systems of the new global economy and culture.

 

"Since 2007, the directors of this project have been collaborating on the development of imagination as the driving force behind this shift. The research and field work covered in this project began in January 2009. Rather than publishing results as a book or white paper, both of which are one-sided approaches to a subject that demands a conversation, an interactive site was chosen as the format.

 

"This site doesn’t just present theories and ideas, but rather actionable solutions that can be immediately and easily implemented in service of a relevant education for American students who need to gain proficiency if not mastery of core subject areas while at the same time being prepared for the reality of future work. Imagination is a broad topic, encompassing everything the mind can conjure, so the findings in this report are focused on those that overlap with the changing world of work."

Jim Lerman's insight:

This site is a remarkable piece of work. The authors, King and Fouts, have assembled a series of essays and resources about the medium range future and how we can make it better.

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Amy Cross's comment, March 5, 2013 7:34 AM
Love this! Thanks for sharing.