:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Students Are Fleeing Liberal Arts - How It Could Hurt the U.S. | The Fiscal Times

Students Are Fleeing Liberal Arts - How It Could Hurt the U.S. | The Fiscal Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steve Yoder

 

"If there’s one thing liberal arts colleges offer, it’s critical thinking. That might be why this spring Occidental College is offering a course called Liberal Arts at the Brink? Navigating the Crisis in Higher Education. The course examines whether college liberal arts curricula like its own can survive in a time of high unemployment and rising student debt.

 

"It’s a question many experts are asking – and some worry about the consequences. The number of liberal arts colleges nationwide has dropped from 212 in 1990 to only 130 today, according to a study this summer in the journal Liberal Education. The National Center for Education Statistics says the share of students matriculating with a liberal arts degree, as a percentage of all graduates, dropped slightly from 2004 to 2010 from 3 to 2.8 percent."

 

Read more at http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2013/01/09/Jilting-Liberal-Arts-Can-Hurt-the-US-to-a-Degree.aspx#iGlxHkXgrvFWy8Tf.99
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 15, 2013 6:47 PM

Are we becoming "job" driven or are we becoming an economy of individuals?  It may another signal of the dawn of the freelance and electronic/independents economy, which may also mean we either self-fund and study what we want to study, curriculum or not.  ~ Deb

Robin Martin's comment, March 9, 2013 5:41 PM
Thanks again Deb!
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Why Apple Is Working on an iWatch and Not iGlasses | NY Times

Why Apple Is Working on an iWatch and Not iGlasses | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Nick Bilton

 

"The wrist is not a scary place for consumers to add their first computer. After all, we’ve been wearing a type of computer there for decades: the wristwatch. (For many of you in the 1970s, a digital watch, some with a mini-calculator, was your first computer.) Now that the wristwatch is being supplanted by the smartphone, the wrist is the perfect place to introduce customers to a computer they can wear."

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Are We Teaching Citizens or Automatons? | Praxis | Big Think

Are We Teaching Citizens or Automatons? | Praxis | Big Think | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Stephen Mazie

 

"College and careers. Careers and college. The Common Core communicates its consequentialist mission consistently throughout its materials, and, truth be told, there is something to admire in its standards' relatively open approach in contrast to the byzantine pedagogical straight jackets they are replacing. The new standards constitute a well-intended attempt to address an inequity-laden public educational system. They seem to stem from sound, research-based analyses of what it takes to build academic skills in young people.  

"There are a couple of “c”s missing, however, and their absence brings me, as an educator, some discontent. Of course we want to prepare our children for college and we want to give them tools for successful careers. But it isn't clear that the Common Core is adequately ambitious or forward thinking, and there is little in the standards to prepare students for citizenship, for creative interactions with ideas, or for contemplating the conundrums of life in the 21st century."

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Off the Wall Learning | Institute of Play

Off the Wall Learning | Institute of Play | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by EdSurge

 

" OFF THE WALL LEARNING is a "highly visual approach to sharing challenge-based informal learning activities" brought to you by the Institute of Play. (You may recall another one of its projects is to create an "edu" version of SimCity.) The aim of Off the Wall Learning is to reinvent activity facilitation by removing the do-as-I-say interaction between instructors and learners, and isolating acitivity instructions (in this case, on a wall poster) such that instructors and learners can approach the activity on equal footing. The first design iteration, conducted in concert with HIVE NYC, has produced this Water Filter Challenge poster and an inquiry-based exploration activity. They've even provided a template poster for educators looking to adapt their own activities. If creating graphic posters is outside of your comfort zone, check out Easel.ly which may help remove some of the anxiety."

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, February 15, 2013 7:11 PM

a fantastic,creative approach to learning

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College Credentials in the Digital Future | Education's Digital Future - Stanford Univ.

College Credentials in the Digital Future | Education's Digital Future - Stanford Univ. | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Summary from Eduction Dive

 

"At a forum hosted by Education's Digital Future (EDF), a project of Stanford University's Graduate School of Education, speakers including Richard Arum, Emily Goligoski, John Katzman and Therese Cannon debated the value of an education in an increasingly digitized world. 

 

While Arum, co-author of "Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses" and professor of sociology at New York University, questioned the meaning and value of a credit hour or secondary degree, Goligoski called attention to new ideas that could disrupt the mold with alternative forms of certification, such as badges, passports and metadata-encoded ID cards.

 

Arum urged those at large to reconsider the antiquated understanding of education in a digital era being increasingly populated with massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other alternatives such as flipped classrooms; Arum claimed a universal assessment of higher education is necessary to get "comparable data" in order to measure what students are actually learning at school."

Jim Lerman's insight:

For access to the complete video recording of the event, click on the title of this scoop or on the image.

 

Very important conversation, although this is quite far from being resolved.

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Educational Leadership:The Prepared Graduate:The Essential Cognitive Backpack

Educational Leadership:The Prepared Graduate:The Essential Cognitive Backpack | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"In this Educational Leadership article, Mel Levine discusses the importance of helping students develop "soft skills" and what he calls the four Is: interpretation, instrumentation, interaction, and inner direction. As he says, students can have superb memories for facts, but educators must make sure students learn how to decipher, interpret, and think.

 

"If high schools merely require students to memorize and mimic, Levine says, students will struggle in college and not be able to decrypt content or have true comprehension. Instead, educators need to help students analyze, evaluate issues, and interpret.

 

"Levine goes on to suggest ways in which high schools can alter their curriculum to support active mental engagement and set students on the road to success in higher education and in life."

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Ken Morrison's comment, February 14, 2013 9:35 PM
I love this line: When I was an undergraduate, Barry Marks, an English professor, told us that “The most important book you'll read in this class is the one you pick up two weeks after the final exam!”
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Exploring Empathy

Exploring Empathy | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

What is this ability to step into someone else’s shoes? To imagine how they feel - and to hurt for them or be happy for them?  Host Frank Stasio is joined by a panel of experts to discuss empathy, the trait that makes us uniquely human.

 

Lasana Harris is an assistant professor in psychology and neuroscience at Duke University; Jesse Prinz is a Distinguished Professor of philosophy at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York; Pate Skene is an associate professor of neurobiology at Duke University and a second year law student; and Ralph Savarese is an associate professor of English at Grinnell College, a Duke Humanities Writ Large Fellow, and the author of “Reasonable People: A Memoir of Autism and Adoption”


Via Edwin Rutsch, David Hain, JLAndrianarisoa, donhornsby, Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 27, 2013 1:45 PM

Want to get better at empathy in order to connect with customers/prospects and create better stories?


Then you might want to listen to this discussion by a panel of experts.


Empathy, like listening, is one of the essential storytelling skills to master. Enjoy this audio file!


And thank you to fellow curator Don Hornsby for originally finding and sharing this piece.

donhornsby's comment, January 27, 2013 5:44 PM
You are welcome.
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A Brief History of Information Design and Visual Storytelling

Humankind has been telling complex stories through simple visuals long before you saw your first infographic at Mashable. History is humbling, let's go back in

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:24 PM

If you are into data and storytelling, then this brief overview is for you. The slideshare program quickly explains data visualization through time.


Of course, how data is displayed -- if done well -- can tell its own story.  The next step is to give a presentation as a story, and tell the story of the data as you are doing so. 


Until then, enjoy this quick historical review of visual storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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17 ways iPads will be used in schools in 2013 | Education DIVE

17 ways iPads will be used in schools in 2013 | Education DIVE | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Roger Riddell

 

"Last year, iPads in education took the world by storm, finding their ways into initiatives at both the K-12 and university levels. Here at Education Dive, we talked to some of the people responsible for those rollouts and watched as schools decided how to use tablets, whether they were Apple's or not.


"In 2013, iPads are still going strong. New pilot programs are winning over former doubters—and in some cases existing programs are expanding.

So how will iPads be used as their classroom roles evolve in 2013? Education Dive found these examples:"

Jim Lerman's insight:

Nice collection of examples of use. Each example is accompanied by a link to an article about the particular implementation.

 

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10 Tips To A More Professional LinkedIn Profile | Hongkiat.com

10 Tips To A More Professional LinkedIn Profile | Hongkiat.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Regardless of whether you are in business, trying to put your startup on the map, new to the working world or focus mostly on non-profit work, LinkedIn is a very good networking tool to help you achieve your professional goals.
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How To Stay Sane: The Art of Revising Your Inner Storytelling

How To Stay Sane: The Art of Revising Your Inner Storytelling | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Maria Popova

 

""[I] pray to Jesus to preserve my sanity," Jack Kerouac professed in discussing his writing routine. But those of us who fall on the more secular end of the spectrum might need a slightly more potent sanity-preservation tool than prayer. That's precisely what writer and psychotherapist Philippa Perry offers in How To Stay Sane (public library; UK), part of The School of Life's wonderful series reclaiming the traditional self-help genre as intelligent, non-self-helpy, yet immensely helpful guides to modern living.

 

"At the heart of Perry's argument – in line with neurologist Oliver Sacks's recent meditation on memory and how "narrative truth," rather than "historical truth," shapes our impression of the world – is the recognition that stories make us human and learning to reframe our interpretations of reality is key to our experience of life:"

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The Secret To Fixing Bad Schools | NY Times

The Secret To Fixing Bad Schools | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By David L. Kirp

 

"WHAT would it really take to give students a first-rate education? Some argue that our schools are irremediably broken and that charter schools offer the only solution. The striking achievement of Union City, N.J. — bringing poor, mostly immigrant kids into the educational mainstream — argues for reinventing the public schools we have.

 

"Union City makes an unlikely poster child for education reform. It’s a poor community with an unemployment rate 60 percent higher than the national average. Three-quarters of the students live in homes where only Spanish is spoken. A quarter are thought to be undocumented, living in fear of deportation.

 

"Public schools in such communities have often operated as factories for failure. This used to be true in Union City, where the schools were once so wretched that state officials almost seized control of them. How things have changed. From third grade through high school, students’ achievement scores now approximate the statewide average. What’s more, in 2011, Union City boasted a high school graduation rate of 89.5 percent — roughly 10 percentage points higher than the national average. Last year, 75 percent of Union City graduates enrolled in college, with top students winning scholarships to the Ivies."

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Teaching with iPad and iTunes U - Apple - 3 free webinars

Teaching with iPad and iTunes U - Apple - 3 free webinars | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Join us for a three-part webcast series and learn how to bring the power of iPad to your classroom. Watch as educators show you how to build customised courses full of dynamic, interactive content you can share with your students."

 

28 February: Getting to Know iTunes U Register now

7 March: Creating Courses with iTunes U Course Manager Register now

14 March: Creating Learning Materials for Your Courses

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Expert tells UW regents to adapt to changing student needs | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Expert tells UW regents to adapt to changing student needs | Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Karen Herzog

 

"Stereotypical college students who live in dorms and go home for the occasional weekend no longer are the main driver of changes in higher education, one of the nation's top education experts told the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents on Friday.

 

"Working adults trying to finish a college degree started years ago, or wanting to gain another degree to either advance in the workplace or reinvent themselves, will push universities to find new ways to deliver an education, said Molly Corbett Broad, president of the American Council on Education.

 

"They're the new majority of college students. They have no desire to live on a college campus. And they juggle too many other demands between jobs and families to take classes on a set schedule, Broad said.

 

"While 15% of the nation's undergrads attend four-year colleges and live on campuses, 43% attend two-year colleges, 37% are enrolled part time, 38% are older than 25, and 25% are older than 30, Broad said."

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What I learned as a 16 y/o intern in Silicon Valley - Part 1 - Fouad Matin

What I learned as a 16 y/o intern in Silicon Valley - Part 1 - Fouad Matin | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Summary by EdSurge

 

"Many high school students spend summers lounging around and enjoying their waning days of not having many real responsibilities. Not so for 17-year-old Fouad Matin, who spent his summer as an engineering intern for ClassDojo down in the Valley. His quippy recap of his experience there offers a host of lessons and insights that even us "adults" (ahem) in the frantic edtech startup space could well take note of."

 

Jim Lerman's insight:

Matin's observations and advice echo those I heard last night from a seasoned entrepreneur.

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"Networked Norms: How Tech Startups and Teen Practices Challenge Organizational Boundaries" | dana boyd

"Networked Norms: How Tech Startups and Teen Practices Challenge Organizational Boundaries" | dana boyd | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by EdSurge

 

"Are you preparing learners for the organizational ecosystem of today? Or are you helping them develop networks so that they're prepared for the organizational shifts that are coming?"

 

#####

 

"Those are but two of many burning questions posed in this danah boyd article (deftly disguised as speech notes) titled, "Networked Norms: How Tech Startups and Teen Practices Challenge Organizational Boundaries." The self-described "work-in-progress" provides significant anecdotal evidence from startup culture and teenage digital practices that suggests an impending doom of sorts for organizational culture as we currently know it.

 

"That's not to say risk-taking whiz kids and saavy teenagers represent future work practices. Boyd readily offers that "teenagers are in a particular life-stage and cultural configuration that mean that they will 'outgrow' many of their practices."

Jim Lerman's insight:

boyd is one of the most provocative thought leaders in ed tech and its social effects. This piece both dazzles and leaves one wanting more conclusiveness, which obviously can't be provided due to the transitory nature of the subject matter.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 PM

Real change or transformation occurs on the boundaries of tradition and the frontier in the form of bricolage. Teenagers might live on those boundaries. Wenger suggested this is what effects change in communities of practice.

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Hacktivity Kits for Webmaking

Hacktivity Kits for Webmaking | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Description by EdSurge

 

" HACKTIVITY KITS is a collection of nine hands-on and web 2.0 activities intended to explain and reinforce the concept of web hacking -- that is, the idea of remixing, reusing, and re-purposing existing content to create new material or glean interesting insights. Created by NYC HIVE, a MacArthur Foundation-supported group of civic-minded organizations (there's a Chicago one, too), the Hacktivity Kits are largely built upon Mozilla WebMaker tools: Popcorn Maker, Thimble, and X-Ray Goggles. Each Hacktivity includes a detailed list of learning goals and objectives, expected results, and supporting resources. There's also an extensive list of icebreakers to get the creative juices flowing and skills tutorials for the WebMaker tools. For example, look to the Online Storytelling kit which explains the SVT (Story, Vision, Tech) model for making "web native" stories. In addition to introductory tutorials on how to use the kit and associated technology, there's also the Spectrogram icebreaker, Popcorn Maker deep-dive, and an out-of-the-box design challenge for teachers just getting their feet wet."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, February 14, 2013 6:34 PM

This is some deep material that will likely engage a large number of students and teachers.

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How Obama-endorsed P-TECH high school is changing education [Q&A] | GigaOm

How Obama-endorsed P-TECH high school is changing education [Q&A] | GigaOm | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Ki Mae Heussner

 

"Summary:

 

In his State of the Union speech, President Obama recognized the IBM-backed Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) in New York. Rashid Davis, P-TECH’s principal, chats with GigaOM about what makes his school work and how it could be replicated around the country."

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:30 PM

A very attractive idea.

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ASCD Express 8.10 - The Freedom of Interpretation: Building Creative Minds

ASCD Express 8.10 - The Freedom of Interpretation: Building Creative Minds | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Tracy McClure, Carol Henerson, and Diane P. Zimmerman

 

"A 6th grader stands in front of his photo montage and moderates an image dialogue with his peers. Using an app from his phone, he creates a study in gray abstraction with a red sweatshirt as the focal point. Just as he has seen his teacher do many times, he invites his peers to "take a moment to look at this picture. What's going on in this picture?"

 

"He carefully paraphrases each of his peers' responses and follows with, "What more can we find?" When a student breaks protocol and asks if the picture was taken in his bedroom, he craftily paraphrases, "So, you are wondering if it is my bedroom? What do you see that makes you say that?"—a nonanswer with a probe for supporting evidence.

 

"He continues, "What more can we find?" The class is mesmerized.

 

A New Path

 

"Five years ago, our school adopted the visual thinking strategies (VTS) program as a way to enhance the study of art and because it offered a way of measuring changes in students' thinking over time. Little did we realize how much this experience would change our teaching.

 

"VTS, developed by Abigail Housen and Philip Yenawine (2000), began as a way to explore aesthetic development in children. New York City teachers told Housen and Yenawine that VTS encourages aesthetic development and develops critical thinking, explaining that their students spontaneously made causal links and regularly sought evidence to support their claims. Likewise, our students demonstrate this level of thought, and we continually discover more about the power of mediated learning to enhance the creative, interpretive experience.

 

"Here are some of the lessons we've learned."

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Storytelling: The Next Step for Visualization

Storytelling: The Next Step for Visualization | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Robert Korsara

 

"Presentation and communication of data have so far played a minor role in visualization research, with most work focused on exploration and analysis. We propose that presentation, in particular using elements from storytelling, is the next logical step and should be a research focus of at least equal importance as each of the other two. Stories package information into a structure that is easily remembered, which is important in many collaborative scenarios when an analyst is not the same person as the one who makes decisions, or simply needs to share information with peers. Data visualization lends itself well to being a communication medium for storytelling, in particular when the story also contains a lot of data. We review the literature on storytelling and presentation and outline the research area. "


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:48 PM

Here's the next stop on the data and visual storytelling journey. While the previous article I curated focused on the history of visual storytelling, this research article addresses 'what's next.'


For the authors of the article -- what's next is the presentation and communication of data that has played only a minor role in research up to this point.


Click on the title of the article "Storytelling: The Next Step for Visualization" at the bottom of the blurb to get a free copy of the research paper. 


The research paper itself focuses on journalism as storytelling -- which it is, but it is not the only method or approach. So the article is limiting in that way. 


Still, there are some good insights about how data visualization needs to move more directly into storytelling using story delivery techniques.


Iin the end, the authors Robert Kosara and Jock Mackinlay say: 

"Storytelling promises to open up entirely new avenues of research in visualization. Going from exploration to analysis to presentation is a natural progression, which is mirrored by the research effort focused on these steps over time. As the field becomes more mature and provides many useful techniques for the first two steps, we need to start focusing on presentation. This is even more important as visualization gets used for decision-making, where the succinct presentation of important facts is crucial."


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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A Look At The Next Generation Model Of Education - Edudemic

A Look At The Next Generation Model Of Education - Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Lucien Vattel

 

Figuring out the next generation model of education isn't as hard as you'd think. Interactive learning and making are already here.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, February 13, 2013 1:38 PM

The part of this article I like the best comes toward the end, when the author describes "What We Can Do to Make Education Better." So cogently expressed, it gave me a warm glow.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:59 PM

The next generation will be a bricolage of something old, something current, and something new. Those will all likely be plural. I am not convinced their will be one new model. I think there will be many and we will need to be more aware of our educational and leadership roles.

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How the bubble of Content Creation increases the value of Content Curation

How the bubble of Content Creation increases the value of Content Curation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"My 2013 prediction warned of the continued fall in the value of online content which would lead to the production of ever more content as media companies tried to maintain ad revenues.

You can think of it as a towering tsunami of content, or as a massive bubble of content inflation.

Just as inflation devalues currencies, content inflation is devaluing content."


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's comment, February 19, 2013 7:00 PM
I think I do but I'm not sure of the connexion you make with content inflation/dilution?
Tagmotion's comment, March 3, 2013 10:59 PM
If we look at content inflation through the lens of making money, it's clear that in terms of monetization through advertising, the internet is the first medium in history where ad inventory grows exponentially every year. Broadcasters are only making real money from iconic TV programs that attract big audiences on the web, for which advertisers will pay a premium to reach. Curating iconic programs - so that relevant segments show up as search results - turns content inflation on its head. Now you have content that's tagged, curated & discoverable at a granular level. And that specificity translates to more highly-targeted advertising which, of course, commands a premium.
Tagmotion's curator insight, March 3, 2013 11:01 PM

See my comment in the stream.

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The Genius of Dogs: A Dimensional Definition of Human Intelligence | Brain Pickings

The Genius of Dogs: A Dimensional Definition of Human Intelligence | Brain Pickings | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Maria Popova

 

"For much of modern history, dogs have inspired a wealth of art and literature, profound philosophical meditations, scientific curiosity, deeply personal letters, photographic admiration, and even some cutting-edge data visualization. But what is it that makes dogs so special in and of themselves, and so dear to us?

 

"Despite the mind-numbing title, The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs Are Smarter than You Think (public library; UK) by Brian Hare, evolutionary anthropologist and founder of the Duke Canine Cognition Center, and Vanessa Woods offers a fascinating tour of radical research on canine cognition, from how the self-domestication of dogs gave them a new kind of social intelligence to what the minds of dogs reveal about our own. In fact, one of the most compelling parts of the book has less to do with dogs and more with genius itself."

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9 Rules for Success by British Novelist Amelia E. Barr, 1901 | Brain Pickings

9 Rules for Success by British Novelist Amelia E. Barr, 1901 | Brain Pickings | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Maria Popova

 

"The secret of success — like its very definition — remains amorphous and forever elusive. For Thoreau, it was a matter of greeting each day with joy; for Jad Abumrad, it comes after some necessary “gut churn”; for Jackson Pollock’s dad, it was about being fully awake to the world; for entrepreneur Paul Graham, it’s about purpose rather than prestige; for designer Paula Scher, it means beginning every day with a capacity for growth. But perhaps, above all, success is about defining it yourself.

 

"Still, those who have succeed — by their own definition, as well as history’s — might be able to glean some insight into the inner workings of accomplishment. From the 1901 volume How They Succeeded: Life Stories of Successful Men Told by Themselves (public library; public domain) comes a wonderful essay by British novelist Amelia E. Barr (1831-1919) who, the despite devastating loss of her husband and three of their six children to yellow fever in 1867, went on to become a dedicated and diligent writer, eventually reaching critical success at the age of fifty-two."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Wonderful thoughts, so delightfully expressed in langauge over 100 years old.

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How to Tell a Good Learning Story | Education Week

How to Tell a Good Learning Story | Education Week | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Sam Chaltain

 

"Earlier this week, at the New Teacher Center's 15th annual conference in San Jose, I urged more than 700 educators to start telling their own stories about teaching and learning, and to stop letting outside forces pigeonhole public perceptions of the work that they do.

 

"The talk went well (view the Prezi below and decide for yourself), but I worried afterwards that all I'd done was suggest a compelling path forward - and provide little else.

 

"A friend in the crowd confirmed this. "Everyone loved the ideas," she told me collegially, "but I'm not sure anyone understands how to tell their story more effectively now than they did before."

 

"I think that's right. So let me do here what I didn't do there - by offering some specific suggestions about how to provide a more hopeful, solution-oriented lens to our work."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Chaltrain takes himself to task, and in so doing, helps us to uderstand better how to tell compelling "stories that stick" about exemplary learning settings and outcomes

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