:: The 4th Era ::
Follow
Find
77.3K views | +19 today
:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Designing a New Learning Environment | Stanford University

Designing a New Learning Environment | Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

A free MOOC from Stanford University led by Paul Kim,  Chief Technology Officer and Assistant Dean for Stanford University School of Education. His courses focus on contextualized innovations in education, mobile empowerment design, and enterprising higher education systems. He is currently one of senior researchers for Programmable Open Mobile Internet, an NSF project to develop and evaluate ubiquitous wireless mobile computing and interactive systems for K-20 formal and informal learning and assessment scenarios."

 

Course starts in Fall 2012 (no additional information given). Course description:

 

"What constitutes learning in the 21st century? Should reading, watching, memorizing facts, and then taking exams be the only way to learn? Or could technology (used effectively) make learning more interactive, collaborative, and constructive? Could learning be more engaging and fun?

 

"We construct, access, visualize, and share information and knowledge in very different ways than we did decades ago. The amount and types of information created, shared, and critiqued every day is growing exponentially, and many skills required in today’s working environment are not taught in formal school systems. In this more complex and highly-connected world, we need new training and competency development—we need to design a new learning environment.

 

"The ultimate goal of this project-based course is to promote systematic design thinking that will cause a paradigm shift in the learning environments of today and tomorrow. Participants are not required to have computer programming skills, but must have 1) a commitment to working in a virtual team and 2) the motivation to help people learn better. All of us have been involved in the learning process at some point in our lives; in this course we invite educators, school leaders, researchers, students, parents, entrepreneurs, computer programmers, illustrators, interface designers, and all those who are interested in working together, to create a new learning environment.

 

"After the completion of this course, students will be able to:

Identify advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and potentials of at least 10 interactive learning models and solutions.

Describe how online communication, collaboration, and visualization technology play a role in the behavioral, cognitive, constructivist, and social dimensions of learning.

Describe the major components and processes involved in development of interactive education systems.

Communicate rationales of learning technology design approaches through team-oriented collaborations.

Evaluate the value of ideas, principles, and techniques used in educational media or systems.

 

"As a Final Team Project, students will design a new learning model catering to 21st century environments and learners. Each self-formed team will design and develop an application or system that combines team interaction activities and learning support features in ways that are effective and appropriate for today's computing and communication devices. Students must consider potential idiosyncrasies with various learning devices (e.g., tablet, phone, PC), infrastructure requirements (e.g., cellular network, wi-fi, Bluetooth), and any special hypothetical circumstances if relevant. In addition, each team must create and defend a business model (non-profit, for-profit, or hybrid) for the launch and scale up their solution.

 

"Additional consideration will be given to teams that come up with system feature ideas presenting meaningful learning interaction and performance analytics."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Creativity Predicts a Longer Life: Scientific American

Creativity Predicts a Longer Life: Scientific American | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Tori Rodirguez

 

"Researchers have long been studying the connection between health and the five major personality traits: agreeableness, extraversion, neuroticism, openness and conscientiousness. A large body of research links neuroticism with poorer health and conscientiousness with superior health. Now openness, which measures cognitive flexibility and the willingness to entertain novel ideas, has emerged as a lifelong protective factor. The linchpin seems to be the creativity associated with the personality trait—creative thinking reduces stress and keeps the brain healthy."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

2 Ways MOOCs Just Became The Schools Of The Future | Edudemic

2 Ways MOOCs Just Became The Schools Of The Future | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Jeff Dunn

 

Udacity course counted for credit by Colorado State University

 

edX partners with Pearson

 

click on image or headline to read more. -JL

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

The Sad Reality Of Education Technology | Edudemic

The Sad Reality Of Education Technology | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Fred Sitkins

(link goes toexcerpt from longer article)

 

"If schools see the importance of using technology to learn, then the only real way to accomplish this goal is to provide that technology to all students all the time. We are fooling ourselves if we believe that we can accomplish this goal by sending students to a computer lab a couple days each week or an hour each day for that matter. Until we place technology in the hands of each student, our teaching models won’t change. Our schools still function under the belief that the teacher or the textbook is the keeper of all knowledge and that the teacher’s role is to disseminate that knowledge to their students.

 

"This model is fundamentally flawed because it teaches our students to be passive participants in the learning process. Under this traditional model, students sit and wait for the teacher to provide them with their great knowledge. Our students learn quickly that they don’t really have a role to play in this process other than to wait for someone else to give them information. If they don’t get it, they just wait a little while longer and they will get more information, help, clues, whatever it takes."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

5 ways to get the most out of LinkedIn

5 ways to get the most out of LinkedIn | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"I'd say I get about 10 requests each week to join someone's network on LinkedIn. And while it's the place to be when looking for a job or to otherwise connect professionally, many people use it only to store their resumes. Yes, it's good for that. But it's also good for finding experts and ideas, meeting people in groups, staying in touch with friends and colleagues and increasing your Klout score. Problem is, many people don't realize that power is at their fingertips."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Selling the College Experience to Students Who Take Classes Online | The Atlantic

Selling the College Experience to Students Who Take Classes Online | The Atlantic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Conor Friedersdorf

 

"Think about it. Over the last few decades, selective colleges have been in an amenities arms race. On college tours you hear about class size and percentage of faculty that is tenured or possessed of a terminal degree. But you also hear about the retina displays in the computer lab, the state-of-the-art exercise equipment in the gym, and at Pomona College, my alma mater, you hear about the kegs of cheap beer that the college purchases for on campus social events.

 

"Perhaps those days are nearly over. The economics of higher education certainly point toward a future where a lot of young people take advantage of distance learning to get a much cheaper education. But even if online learning becomes the norm, won't the desires for both amenities and "the college experience" persist? I think so, and I can imagine variations ways those desires might be met."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Site-based testing deals strengthen case for granting credit to MOOC students | Inside Higher Ed

Site-based testing deals strengthen case for granting credit to MOOC students | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steve Kolowich

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"The massive open online course (MOOC) provider edX took a step toward boosting the credibility of its “graduates” on Thursday, announcing a partnership with Pearson’s testing centers that would allow students in edX’s free, online courses to take proctored exams. Students who pass the proctored versions of the exams will still not receive credit from edX’s partner universities, which currently include the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the University of California at Berkeley. But the availability of supervised, in-person exams could make it difficult for other degree-granting institutions to deny course credit to students who pass them."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

First-Rate Temperaments | Washington Monthly

First-Rate Temperaments | Washington Monthly | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

"Liberals don’t want to admit it, and conservatives don’t want to pay for it, but building character—resilience, optimism, perseverance, focus—may be the best way to help poor students succeed."

 

Book review by Thomas Toch

Summary by PEN Weekly Newsblast

 

"In a review in The Washington Monthly of Paul Tough's How Children Succeed, Thomas Toch writes that Tough addresses a new body of neuroscientific and psychological research suggesting the most severe consequences of poverty on learning are psychological and behavioral rather than cognitive -- in some ways refuting his earlier work on the Harlem Children's Zone and the intersection of poverty and education. Tough presents research from neuroendocrinology and other fields that finds childhood psychological traumas -- from physical and sexual abuse to physical and emotional neglect, divorce, parental incarceration, and addiction -- overwhelm the ability of developing bodies and minds ability to manage stress, blocking capacity to learn, for example, the alphabet. The good news, Tough reports, is that studies reveal nurturing relationships with parents or other caregivers engenders resilience in children that insulates them from some of the worst effects of a harsh environment. Tough also contends that research shows resilience, optimism, perseverance, focus, and other non-cognitive skills can be taught, practiced, learned, and improved, even into adulthood. These traits go a long way toward refuting cognitive determinists who claim success is a function of IQ. This research also undercuts claims by Klein, Rhee, et alia that we can lead impoverished students to success through higher standards, stronger teachers, and other academic reforms alone."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

First humanities MOOC professors road-test Coursera's peer grading model | Inside Higher Ed

First humanities MOOC professors road-test Coursera's peer grading model | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steve Kolowich

 

"And here is where the philosophy of MOOCs collides with the idea of certifiable achievement in a literature course: “If we’re going to keep this completely open,” says Rabkin, “then no credential can have a well-understood meaning.”

 

"Daphne Koller, one of the co-founders of Coursera, says that the peer-grading experiment is still very much a work-in-progress. "We will undoubtedly learn a lot from the experiences of our instructors as they encounter this phenomenon, and then have a better sense of where exactly the tensions lie and how one might deal with them," she says. "We also have some ideas of our own that we'll throw in the mix and evaluate as we plan the next phase of this experiment."

 

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/08/30/first-humanities-mooc-professors-road-test-courseras-peer-grading-model#ixzz25mxUkjnV
Inside Higher Ed

 


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Webinar on “The Global Crisis and Promise of Higher Ed” Co-sponsored by Kean U. and 4Humanities | 4Humanities

Webinar on “The Global Crisis and Promise of Higher Ed” Co-sponsored by Kean U. and 4Humanities | 4Humanities | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The Kean University Faculty Seminar in partnership with 4Humanities will be running an online faculty and professional webinar series on “The Global Crisis and Promise of Higher Education” with eight video conference meetings September 2012 to May 2013. "

 

FIRST SESSION: MONDAY, SEPT. 10, 3:20-4:20 PM EASTERN TIME

This is a free program

-------------------------------------------------------

DEBBIE MORRISON -‐ Session Leader for Sept. 10


THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUATION AND HOW EDUCATORS CAN REMAIN RELEVANT
Ms. Morrison is a leading exponent for online learning pedagogy and serves as the head curriculum developer for the Online Learning Department of a four-‐year liberal arts college in southern California

--------------------------------------------------------

 

Register at http://bit.ly/KEANhiedWBNR

 

I am co-chairing this series with Dennis Klein. -JL


Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Why Grit is More Important Than Good Grades | Time

Why Grit is More Important Than Good Grades | Time | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Paul Tough

 

"The educational process feels more than ever like a race, one that starts in pre-preschool and doesn’t end until your child is admitted to the perfect college. There is a lot of advice out there on how best to help our kids thrive, but after surveying the research, I believe that most parents are more worried than they need to be about their children’s grades, test scores and IQ. And what we don’t think about enough is how to help our children build their character— how to help them develop skills like perseverance, grit, optimism, conscientiousness, and self-control, which together arguably do more to determine success than S.A.T. scores or I.Q."
Read more: http://ideas.time.com/2012/09/05/why-grit-is-more-important-than-grades/#ixzz25j5YpEqO

 

I agree with Tough, and I'm wondering how Andrew Rotherham, Time's resident education expert, feels about these ideas...I'm guessing not too happy. -JL

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Didaktiken, Kursdesign, Theoriehintergründe für E-learning, E-Moderation, E-Coaching
Scoop.it!

Here Are Ten Rules to Create Engaging Elearning » The Rapid eLearning Blog

Here Are Ten Rules to Create Engaging Elearning » The Rapid eLearning Blog | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

"Instead of a series of click-and-read screens, give the learner a problem to solve"


Via callooh, Heiko Idensen
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Will Technology Lead to the Unbundling of Schools?

Will Technology Lead to the Unbundling of Schools? | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Justin Reich

 

"The plan espoused by Education Reform in the Digital Era proposes that students should no longer receive a comprehensive education from a single school. Rather, we should "unbundle" holistic schools and replace them with a free market of classes, where kids buy their education like they were buying dinner from conveyor belt sushi: whatever suits their fancy, one piece at a time.

 

"The key policy change that the Fordham authors propose is to "voucherize" school funding, so every student gets directly allotted their portion of municipal educational expenses. Then, as Paul Hill explains:

 

'Each student's account would, in a sense, constitute a "backpack" of funding that the student would carry along to any eligible school or instructional programs in which he or she enrolls. The contents of the backpack would be flexible dollars, not coupons whose use is restricted to a particular course or service.

 

'If a family decided to rely on one school or instructional provider for all of a child's education, all of the money would go to that school or provider. However, students might also enroll in courses provided by different organizations, in which case the funds would be divided. Students and families would then be free to shop for the best combination of courses and experiences their backpack funds could cover. Providers would compete with one another to offer services that were of high quality, effective, and reasonably priced.'

 

"In this model, schools are no longer comprehensive providers of a holistic educational experience, but rather the producers and marketers of a line of educational products. Students could outfit themselves with an entire line from one school, or they could could pick and choose from providers, buying math from Khan Academy, Spanish from Rosetta Stone, and biology from the Discovery Institute, the chief advocates of Intelligent Design. No longer would kids be bound to their neighborhood school; instead, they could shop the world for courses."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

A Crash Course on Creativity | Stanford University

A Crash Course on Creativity | Stanford University | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Free online course given by the brilliant Tina Seeling, Executive Director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and author of the wonderfully creative 2009 book "What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World" and the recently published "inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity".

 

Course is to start in Fall 2012 (nothing more specific given...I  signed up today and it hasn't started yet).

 

Information from the website:

 

"This crash course is designed to explore several factors that stimulate and inhibit creativity in individuals, teams, and organizations. In each session we will focus on a different variable related to creativity, such as framing problems, challenging assumptions, and creative teams.

 

"The course is highly experiential, requiring each student to participate actively, taking on weekly projects. Each Monday a new challenge will be presented, and the results are due the following Friday. Some of the challenges will be completed individually, and some will be done in teams. There will be a two-week project toward the end of the course that will allow you to use all the tools you have learned.

 

"To foster collaboration and learning between the students, we will craft teams for each assignment. Each project will be done with a different team, so students get a chance to work with a wide variety of participants. All submissions will be viewed and evaluated by the course participants. There will also be a course Twitter feed and Facebook page, and several scheduled Google Hangouts that will enable active discussions on specific topics."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Learning with 'e's: The changing Web

Learning with 'e's: The changing Web | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steve Wheeler

 

"This is number 4 in the series of blog posts entitled 'Shaping Education for the Future.' Yesterday's post can be found at this link.

 

 

"We need to acknowledge that 'Web 2.0' remains a contested label for new and emergent properties that are found on the Web. It is a complex network of dynamic resources that we all acknowledge is constantly changing to adapt to the growing demand for entertainment, communication and access to knowledge. Debate focuses on whether the emerging social applications constitute a sea change or revolution in the Web (cf. Van Dijk, 2002) or simply another phase in its relentless progress. Personally, I find myself in agreement with Brian Winston (2003) who views the Web as a facet of gradual evolution rather than symptoms of sudden revolution. Essentially, the Web has become more social. As with most other technology innovations, Web 2.0 applications have grown out of the need for people to connect together, share experiences and knowledge, enhance their experiences and open up new possibilities in learning. Social software is software that enables people to both read from, and write onto web spaces. It truly is the ‘architecture of participation’ (Barsky and Purdon, 2006) and demands active engagement as a natural part of its character (Kamel Boulos and Wheeler, 2007)."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Earning college credit for MOOCs through prior learning assessment | Inside Higher Ed

Earning college credit for MOOCs through prior learning assessment | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Paul Fain

 

"Here’s how the process could work: A student successfully completes a MOOC, like Coursera’s Social Network Analysis, which will be taught this fall by Lada Adamic, an associate professor at the University of Michigan. The student then describes what he or she learned in that course, backing it up with proof, in a portfolio developed with the help of LearningCounts.org or another service, perhaps offered by a college."


Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/06/15/earning-college-credit-moocs-through-prior-learning-assessment#ixzz25ze1Ztn2
Inside Higher Ed

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Reading, Math and Grit | NY Times

Reading, Math and Grit | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Another very positive review of Paul Tough's new book, "How Children Succeed". This one by Joe Nocera, columnist.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

20 Ways Online Students Can Get the F2F Experience - Online Universities

20 Ways Online Students Can Get the F2F Experience - Online Universities | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Online college has many advantages, including flexibility, cost, and the option to study while wearing fuzzy bunny slippers. But what if you want to, you know, actually hang out with your classmates? Interaction can be difficult for some online college students, but there are several ways to make the online education experience more personal. Whether you’re actually getting out there and meeting your classmates, or just connecting socially online, here are 20 ways online students can enjoy a more personal experience."

 

Via  EDTC@UTB

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Education Leadership: Will Richardson at TEDxMelbourne

video published Sept. 2, 2012

 

"Will Richardson has spent the past decade thinking and writing about how emerging web technologies can be best used in classrooms and schools. Called 'a trendsetter in education' by The New York Times, Will is author of the bestselling book Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms, and has spoken to tens of thousands of educators in more than a dozen countries about the value of online learning networks.

 

":Last month, in the middle of a cold Melbourne winter, we hosted a free event in the State Library of Victoria's Experimedia room -- a distinctive space where 19th-century grandeur meets 21st-century digital technology in a spacious bluestone-walled courtyard. Around 250 educators came together to explore the theme of Education Leadership.

 

"The attendees were encouraged to start thinking about how they can work together rather than in isolation within their own classrooms. The event focused on the changing nature of education and how technology can shape the future of learning which each of the speakers speaking passionately about their areas of expertise."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

U.T.-Arlington Adopts New Way to Tackle Algebra | NY Times

U.T.-Arlington Adopts New Way to Tackle Algebra | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Reeve Hamilton

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

Photo by Allison V. Smith

 

"Alexzandria Siprian, a senior at the University of Texas at Arlington who is double-majoring in Spanish and theater, is not a math person. Early in her college career, she squeaked through her required algebra course with a D. Ms. Siprian said that her professor was very difficult to understand, but she also blames herself “because I never tried to get help,” she said. “They have tutoring services, but I never took advantage of it.” Her experience is not unique. Of the 1,041 U.T.-Arlington students who took college algebra in the spring 2011 semester, only about 47 percent earned a C or higher. “Nationally, the single greatest academic barrier to student success is mathematics,” said Michael Moore, senior vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies at the university. Seeking to improve the situation, U.T.-Arlington officials decided to take an approach that is becoming increasingly common throughout the country: letting computers do the teaching."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Why Complex Teacher Evaluations Don't Work | Education Week

Why Complex Teacher Evaluations Don't Work | Education Week | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Mike Schmoker

Summary by PEN Weekly Newsblast

 

"Once again, writes Mike Schmoker in Education Week, we are rushing into a premature, ill-conceived innovation without solid evidence it promotes better teaching. Documents that are "bloated," "jargon-laced," and "confusing" will be used to evaluate and compensate teachers on the basis of multiple, full-period, pre-announced classroom observations. Each observation will be preceded and followed by meetings between teachers and administrators, requiring enormous time, paperwork, and preparation. Schmoker is not against teacher evaluation and observation; he thinks they are among the strongest components of effective school improvement. But he feels the coming frameworks lack clarity and focus, and should be postponed on the basis of sheer bulk and "murky, agenda-driven language." Done right, teacher evaluation could ensure systematic action and spur immediate improvement, Schmoker says. But we must ensure a clear, coherent curriculum is in place before attaching high stakes to any evaluation. Once this type of curriculum is in place, we should evaluate teachers as to whether they are implementing and improving their curriculum in teams, with their same-course colleagues, and we should observe and evaluate teachers on the basis of short, frequent, unannounced classroom visits, using age-old criteria that Schmoker lists."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

MOOCs' Little Brother | Inside Higher Ed

MOOCs' Little Brother | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Steve Kolowich

 

"The four open courses at Presque Isle, which the university is piloting this semester under the brand OpenU, are vanishingly small by MOOC standards. Each has admitted two to seven nonpaying students in additional to the 15 or so who are taking the course for $220 or more per credit at the university. (MOOCs have been known to attract tens of thousands of registrants, thousands of which stick around for the duration.)

 

"Like MOOC registrants, the OpenU students will not be vetted ahead of time and will not receive formal credit for completing the course. However, unlike the institutions that are offering MOOCs, Presque Isle is pledging to draw no further distinctions between its paying students and its nonpaying participants."

 

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2012/09/06/u-maine-campus-experiments-small-scale-high-touch-open-courses#ixzz25kyA1KiI

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Apple and Orangutans: Apes Found to be Enamored with iPads | TIME.com

Apple and Orangutans: Apes Found to be Enamored with iPads | TIME.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kharunya Paramaguru

 

"As part of a program called Apps for Apes, launched by New York based not-for-profit Orangutan Outreach, 12 zoos across North America have incorporated playing on donated iPads as part of the orangutans’ mental enrichment time.

 

"The animals spend anywhere between five minutes to half an hour playing on the tablets, which are held by the zookeepers. (Just like humans, the orangutans have a tendency to smash the screen.) Apps created for children tend to be the most popular, including finger-painting and drum apps. The apes are also said to be fond of nature documentaries by David Attenborough, the popular British broadcaster and naturalist of Planet Earth renown....

 

"As their name suggests (orangutan literally translates from Malay and Baha Indonesian to “man of the forest”), the orange or reddish apes are highly intelligent creatures that require mental stimulation to keep from growing bored or depressed."

 

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/09/06/apple-and-orangutans-apes-found-to-be-enamored-with-ipads/#ixzz25jBnEgDo

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Didaktiken, Kursdesign, Theoriehintergründe für E-learning, E-Moderation, E-Coaching
Scoop.it!

Quality Teaching School stories

Quality Teaching School stories | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

The New South Wales (NSW) department of education in Australia has developed a comprehensive model for school, administrator, and teacher development. This section of the department's website provides rich resources, including profiles of exemplary schools. -JL

 

From the website

 

"In this website you will find a range of information, research and resources to support the implementation of the NSW Quality Teaching model. The NSW Quality Teaching resources and support materials have been developed to assist schools in planning for and implementing the model. These materials have been designed to support teacher professional learning and practice through reflection, analysis and collegial discussion. "


Via Heiko Idensen
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org: Inert Greatness - Schools that Fail to Plan their #iPad Implementation

Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org: Inert Greatness - Schools that Fail to Plan their #iPad Implementation | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Miguel Guhlin

 

"As iPads grow in popularity, it should come as no surprise that this difficult to manage technology is brought into schools, then ignored. Ignored? Yes, school districts buy them, issue them to campus staff, and then consider their job over..."Ok, we now have an iPad in the school, so let's get back to the real work of schools--stultifying creativity." (rubs hands together annoyingly)."

 

more...
Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:14 PM
LOL!