:: The 4th Era ::
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:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
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Faces of the New Higher Ed: Learning By Working | Mind/Shift

Faces of the New Higher Ed: Learning By Working | Mind/Shift | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Katrina Schwartz

 

"Students are now considering whether work experience should come even before college education. What if applicants already had a solid footing in the industries they hope to enter? That’s the mission of Enstitute, a New York City-based non-profit that’s promoting the idea of learning by doing.

 

"Co-founder Kane Sarhan developed Enstitute based on his personal experiences in college and in apprenticeships. He was a high achiever in university, but never felt very connected to what he studied until he started getting real-world experience through internships. Suddenly, the marketing terms used in class became relevant and there was a reason to understand them. His apprenticeships helped him get real-world job experience that he parlayed into a first job with more responsibility and higher pay than some of his peers who had graduated from top universities."

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Demystifying "the Process of Meaning Making" and Close Reading | Burkins & Yaris

Demystifying "the Process of Meaning Making" and Close Reading | Burkins & Yaris | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

In this post, we present Vicky Vinton and Dorothy Barnhouse's book What Readers Really Do as one of our highly recommended text for learning what it means to read closely.


Via Mark Gillingham, Jim Lerman
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Capturing the Visible Evidence of Invisible Learning | Academic Commons

Capturing the Visible Evidence of Invisible Learning | Academic Commons | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

A Picture of New Learning: Cross-Cutting Findings


"Collectively, what emerged from this work was an expansive picture of learning. Although we started out with questions about technology, early on it became clear that the questions were no longer merely about the “impact of tools” on learning; the emergent findings compelled us to confront the very nature of what we recognized as learning, which in turn fed back into what we were looking for in our teaching. Over the years, faculty experienced iterative cycles of innovation in their teaching practice, of reflection on an increasingly expansive range of student learning, and of experimentation shaped by the deepening complexity (and at times befuddlement) that emerged from trying to read the evidence of that learning. From this spiral of activity developed a research framework with broad implications for the now-emergent Web 2.0 technologies. We have come to articulate this range of cross-cutting findings under the headings of three types of learning: adaptive, embodied, and socially situated.

"Briefly, by adaptive learning we mean the skills and dispositions that students acquire which enable them to be flexible and innovative with their knowledge, what David Perkins calls a “flexible performance capability.”7 An emphasis on adaptive capacities in student learning emerged naturally from our foundational focus on visible intermediate processes. What became visiblewere the intermediate intellectual moves that students make in trying to work with difficult cultural materials or ideas, illuminating how novice learners progress toward expertise or expert-like thinking in these contexts.

 

"Our recognition of the embodied nature of learning emerged from this increased attention to intermediate processes--the varied forms of invention, judgment, reflection--when we realized that we were no longer accounting for simply cognitive activities. Many manifestations of the affective dimension of learning opened up in this intermediate space informed by new media, whether it was the way that students drew on their personal experience in social dialogue spaces, or the sensual and emotional dimensions of working with multimedia representations of history and culture. In these intermediate spaces, dimensions of affect such as motivation and confidence loomed large as well. We have come to think of this expansive range of learning as embodied, in that it pointed us to the ways that knowledge is experienced through the body as well as the mind, and how intellectual and cognitive thinking are embodied by whole learners and scholars.

 

"nasmuch as this new learning is embodied, similarly is it socially situated. Influenced by the range of work on situated learning, communities of practice, and participatory learning, our work with new technologies continuously brought us to see the impact new forms of engagement through media had on the students’ relative stance to learning. This effect was not merely a sense of heightened interest due to the novelty of new forms of social learning. Rather, what we were seeing was evidence of the ways that multimedia authoring, for example, constructed for students a salient sense of audience and public accountability for their work; this, in turn, had an impact on nearly every aspect of the authoring process--visible in the smallest and largest compositional decisions. The socially situated nature of learning became a summative value, capturing what Seely Brown calls “learning to be,” beyond mere knowledge acquisition to a way of thinking, acting, and a sense of identity.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Kent Wallén
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Quite expansive and informative documentation of a group of largely humanities scholars at numerous campuses who have worked hard to integrate digital media into their scholarship and teaching.

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Mark Gillingham's curator insight, January 18, 2013 4:28 PM

When using social media, new technology, or collaborative discussion students show you their engagement and motivation. 

Ignacio Jaramillo's curator insight, January 22, 2013 8:54 AM

The Difference that Inquiry Makes:
A Collaborative Case Study of Technology and Learning, from the Visible Knowledge Project.
Edited By Randy Bass & Bret Eynon

 

http://www.academiccommons.org/files/BassEynonCapturing.pdf

 

The essay complements eighteen case studies on teaching, learning, and new media technologies. Together the essay and studies constitute the digital volume "The Difference that Inquiry Makes: A Collaborative Case Study of Learning and Technology, from the Visible Knowledge Project." For more information about VKP, see https://digitalcommons.georgetown.edu/blogs/vkp/

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7 Ways to Increase Your Creativity | Hongkiat.com

7 Ways to Increase Your Creativity | Hongkiat.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Jordan Driediger

 

"Let’s get this out of the way to begin with: you are creative! Creativity is a governing force in humanity – an innate function of the mind. It is, at its essence, your outward expression of an inward thought or emotion.

 

"This means that there are two hindrances that can limit your creativity: an internal barrier that limits your imagination and inspiration, and an external barrier that limits your expression or presentation of your creativity.

 

I"n either or these instances, there are simple but very effective techniques you can use to get your creativity flowing"

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The Predecessor To Google Books, Facebook Graph Search, And Rewind.me--In The Early 1900s

The Predecessor To Google Books, Facebook Graph Search, And Rewind.me--In The Early 1900s | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
You want an idea to survive hundreds or thousands of years? Step one: Don’t write it on paper. Alexander Konta believed this deeply. Paper yellows and withers and crumbles; it is the printed form of Alzheimer’s.

 

"Modern social media began as a fetish for real-time connections--what we’re thinking, reading, watching, all of it outdated the second we post. But now that we’ve written our own gigantic diaries, we’ve entered a flashback phase. The Library of Congress is archiving our tweets. Facebook dragged us into Timeline then a Graph Search that turns us and our social past into definitive search results. Twitter promises downloadable tweet archives. Timehop emails users “a time capsule of you” based on whatever junk they posted on social media a year prior. Cue, Recollect, ArchiveSocial, Backupify: short-term history suddenly has value.

 

"In the scope of long-term history, the effort to systematically archive things is also quite new. In America, the first state archives were set up in Alabama in 1901. The American Historical Association held a “Conference on Archivists” in 1909; it was the first time in American history that self-identified archivists met as a group. “I think that technology played a key role here,” says New York University history professor Peter Wosh. “Historians and early archivists were especially excited about disseminating ‘true’ and ‘authentic’ copies of documentation.”

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Dartmouth to end use of Advanced Placement scores for credit | Inside Higher Ed

Dartmouth to end use of Advanced Placement scores for credit | Inside Higher Ed | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Alexandra Tisley

 

"Advanced Placement courses might cover college-level content, but Dartmouth College has decided that’s not the same as taking a college course. So beginning with the class of 2018, the college will no longer grant credit based on its students' AP test scores in high school."


Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/01/18/dartmouth-end-use-advanced-placement-scores-credit#ixzz2ILpdNGlR
Inside Higher Ed

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Must-read report on maker-driven education

Must-read report on maker-driven education | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"A new research report released by the Connected Learning Research Network is a call for educators, parents, youth, media-makers, geeks, creatives and intellectuals everywhere to work together to make the learning riches of the online world accessible to everyone. The researchers provide evidence of the importance of making, tinkering, exploration, collaboration, and problem-solving in learning to thrive in today's networked world. They also cite growing equity gap between young people who are highly connected and activated 21st Century learners and those who are subject to no-frills education and have little support for enriched, socially networked, or inquiry-based learning.

 

'We're seeing the tremendous potential of new media for advancing learning,' said says lead author Mimi Ito, a professor of anthropology, informatics and education at UC Irvine. 'But, right now, it's only the most activated and well-supported learners who are using connected learning to boost their learning and opportunity. We believe many more young people can experience this kind of learning, but there's no question we're at risk of seeing yet another way privileged individuals can gain advantage -- even though the Internet and digital technology has the potential to even the playing field and multiply the opportunities for all youth to find their place and achieve.'

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China’s Ambitious Goal for Boom in College Graduates | NY Times

China’s Ambitious Goal for Boom in College Graduates | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Keith Bradsher

 

"China is making a $250 billion-a-year investment in what economists call human capital. Just as the United States helped build a white-collar middle class in the late 1940s and early 1950s by using the G.I. Bill to help educate millions of World War II veterans, the Chinese government is using large subsidies to educate tens of millions of young people as they move from farms to cities.

 

"The aim is to change the current system, in which a tiny, highly educated elite oversees vast armies of semi-trained factory workers and rural laborers. China wants to move up the development curve by fostering a much more broadly educated public, one that more closely resembles the multifaceted labor forces of the United States and Europe.

 

"It is too early to know how well the effort will pay off."

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UC regents pledge to expand online education in next few years | LA Times

UC regents pledge to expand online education in next few years | LA Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

by Larry Gordon

 

"University of California leaders pledged Wednesday to sharply expand online education over the next few years, possibly aiming to have UC students take about 10% of all their classes online — averaging four courses toward their degree.

 

"UC administrators also floated the idea of establishing a fully online academy that might allow students to earn the equivalent of a community college degree before transferring to a University of California campus.

 

"Developing more than 150 new online courses for freshmen and sophomores by 2016, among other moves, "would be a magnificent opportunity to educate more students and be more efficient," UC President Mark G. Yudof said."

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Disadvantaged students in U.S. gaining on international peers | Hechinger Report

Disadvantaged students in U.S. gaining on international peers | Hechinger Report | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Sarah Butrymowicz

 

"A report released Tuesday aims to debunk claims that the United States lags substantially behind the international competition in education. The study, released by the Stanford Graduate School of Education and the Economic Policy Institute, argues that looking only at the United States’ average score on international exams is problematic and can lead to unwarranted policy conclusions.

 

By disaggregating the data of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), researchers concluded that U.S. students fared better on the exam in 2009 than most had originally believed. In particular, low-income students appear to have gained ground on disadvantaged students in other countries.

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5 Things That Really Smart People Do

5 Things That Really Smart People Do | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Don't get in the way of your own learning. Here are five ways to step aside and continue to increase your smarts.
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Governor Jerry Brown, Udacity Announce Pilot Program for $150 Classes

Governor Jerry Brown, Udacity Announce Pilot Program for $150 Classes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Today startup Udacity and the California State University system announced they would jointly pilot classes specifically to provide students with a completely online class experience-a first for MOOCs and university professors.  The program, which will launch at  San Jose State University, will offer the classes for $150 apiece and will start this month. 

 

"The initial classes,  which will include a remedial algebra course, college-level algebra and introduction to statistics, will be limited to 300 students in total (100 per class), half from SJSU and half from nearby community colleges and high schools. The National Science Foundation is providing funds to study the effectiveness of the new online classes."

Jim Lerman's insight:

Jerry Brown, the youngest Governor in the history of California and the oldest Governor in the history of California. Certainly not afraid to be a pathfinder.

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Facebook Graph Search Is Boring: We Need A Unified Search AI | readwrite social

Facebook Graph Search Is Boring: We Need A Unified Search AI | readwrite social | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Jon Mitchell

 

"The big Facebook news tech blogs were all freaking out about turned out to be just another shot in the platform wars.

 

"There's nothing exciting about Facebook's Graph Search. It's just another way to lock in free users to a mediocre, incomplete service, just like Google wants to do with Google+. Until there's a personalized, natural-language search box that can search whatever and wherever we want, I don't think anything else matters.

 

"The way I see it, there are three companies offering rudimentary artificial intelligence to consumers at a grand scale: Google, Apple, and now Facebook. (Sorry, Microsoft, you're a distant fourth.) All of these companies want to provide you convenient answers when you ask them questions in your own language. Hundreds of millions of people use more than one of these. Many use all three. But they can only be used one at a time. While you're using any one of them, you're not using the others. Therein lies the problem.

 

"Asking questions and getting answers is one of the most important things we want to do with computers. It's the thing that impresses us most. Our sense of living in the future is bolstered by this very feature. When it works, we're amazed. When it fails, we feel like our magical gadgets have let us down."

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America's first bookless public library will look 'like an Apple Store'

America's first bookless public library will look 'like an Apple Store' | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Bexar County, Texas says that it will open the first 100 percent digital public library system in the country, unveiling plans for its first location this past week. The plan has been in the works...

Via Alexandra Duarte, Luciana Viter
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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | NPR

In 1979, when Jim Stigler was still a graduate student at the University of Michigan, he went to Japan to research teaching methods and found himself sitting in the back row of a crowded fourth grade math class.

 

"The teacher was trying to teach the class how to draw three-dimensional cubes on paper," Stigler explains, "and one kid was just totally having trouble with it. His cube looked all cockeyed, so the teacher said to him, 'Why don't you go put yours on the board?' So right there I thought, 'That's interesting! He took the one who can't do it and told him to go and put it on the board.'"

 

Stigler knew that in American classrooms, it was usually the best kid in the class who was invited to the board. And so he watched with interest as the Japanese student dutifully came to the board and started drawing, but still couldn't complete the cube. Every few minutes, the teacher would ask the rest of the class whether the kid had gotten it right, and the class would look up from their work, and shake their heads no. And as the period progressed, Stigler noticed that he — Stigler — was getting more and more anxious.

 

"I realized that I was sitting there starting to perspire," he says, "because I was really empathizing with this kid. I thought, 'This kid is going to break into tears!'"

 

But the kid didn't break into tears. Stigler says the child continued to draw his cube with equanimity. "And at the end of the class, he did make his cube look right! And the teacher said to the class, 'How does that look, class?' And they all looked up and said, 'He did it!' And they broke into applause." The kid smiled a huge smile and sat down, clearly proud of himself.

 

Click headline to read more and listen to the NPR segment--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc, Mark Gillingham
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David Kelley: How to build your creative confidence | TED Talks

" Is your school or workplace divided into "creatives" versus practical people? Yet surely, David Kelley suggests, creativity is not the domain of only a chosen few. Telling stories from his legendary design career and his own life, he offers ways to build the confidence to create."

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Twitter Storytelling: See Tweets Transformed Into Haunting Works Of Art | Fast Company

Twitter Storytelling: See Tweets Transformed Into Haunting Works Of Art | Fast Company | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Paula Bernstein

 

Every tweet may contain a story. But in 140 characters or less, tweets can only hint at drama, romance, tragedy, and intrigue.Artists Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman take the story one step further into the real world, adding a visual component to.tweets in their "Geolocation" project.

 

"Using publicly available GPS metadata in Twitter posts, the duo track the location of tweets and take photographs, creating a real-world context for the virtual information. They then pair the photograph with the tweet, often to powerful effect."

 

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Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:36 AM

Shows lack of privacy in this digital age.

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Managing High-Enrollment Online Courses | Faculty Focus

Managing High-Enrollment Online Courses | Faculty Focus | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Rob Kelly

 

"Online instructors are being asked to accommodate an increasing number of students in their courses. The challenge is to manage the workload associated with these high-enrollment courses."

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Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org: Collect Student Work Easily - Setup Your #iPad as a WebDav Server @timholt2007 @kayjohnranch

Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org: Collect Student Work Easily - Setup Your #iPad as a WebDav Server @timholt2007 @kayjohnranch | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Miguel Guhlin

 

"Earlier today, the following tweet found its way into my twitter feed:

 

 34  kayjohnranch: @mguhlin i am wanting to transfer videos, imovie projects etc from stdt iPads set up on a school acct to my ipad, ideas on how to do it?

This kind of request is becoming a clarion call for making it easy to get student work--or anything--of the iPad (read Tim Holt's Petition to App Developers). 

Ok, the conditions for resolving Kay's question are pretty straightforward. Let's review them:

No computer in sight or available...just iPads, the teacher's and students'.No "cloud-based" storage location (e.g. eBackpack, Edmodo, WebDav Server running OwnCloud, Google Drive, Dropbox, etc.)

Simply, how does the teacher get students' Camera Roll projects onto teacher's iPad without a computer or cloud storage? It's like a riddle, isn't it?

Here's one possible solution--turn your teacher iPad into a server! My response in 140 characters or less:

Setup your iPad up as a server. Use Readdle'sDocuments to turn ur iPad into a server. Students use WebDavNavigator

Read the rest of this blog entry to get the step by step approach!

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[INFOGRAPHIC] An Overview of the Principles of Adult Learning

[INFOGRAPHIC] An Overview of the Principles of Adult Learning | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Nicole Legault

 

"After humming and hawing I decided that my third instructional design/learning themed infographic would be the Principles of Adult Learning. Now, I will be honest and say that while I knew a few principles (adults have experience, adults like control over their learning experiences, etc.) I was lacking in my overall knowledge in that area. Creating an infographic is a great cure to this. I need to research, read articles and gather the appropriate information. Then I have to boil it down to its most simple form and try to find visuals that represent what I am trying to communicate. Anyways, it’s a good learning process.

I

"thought I would jump online and quickly find the “list” of the 6 adult learning principles, or whatever. No such list exists. After much reading I have come to find out that there is no actual official consensus on what the principles of adult learning are. Many are generally agreed upon, but there is still much theoretical debate going on for each proposed principle.

 

"So here’s my disclaimer: there is no proven adult learning theory and the information in the infographic below is subject to much debate and differing opinions."

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Darius Douglass's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:27 AM

Learning is about empowerment.  There is a skill in learning how to learn.  Its the purpose and the service I provide to adults as a trainer/consultant.

Authentis Formations's curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:09 AM

Il faut se renouveler sans cesse...

Connie Baques 's curator insight, November 22, 2013 10:37 AM

Good

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Moody’s Gives Colleges a Negative Grade | NY Times

Moody’s Gives Colleges a Negative Grade | NY Times | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Andrew Martin

 

"The credit reporting agency Moody’s said on Wednesday that it had revised its financial outlook for colleges and universities, giving a negative grade to the entire field.

 

"For the last two years, Moody’s Investors Service gave the nation’s most elite public and private colleges a stable forecast while assigning a negative outlook to the rest of higher education. (Moody’s assigned a negative outlook for the sector in 2009, but it upgraded the most elite ones to stable in 2011-2012.)

 

"On Wednesday, Moody’s explained the change by saying that even the best colleges and universities faced diminished prospects for revenue growth, given mounting public pressure to keep tuition down, a weak economy and the prospect that a penny-pinching Congress could cut financing for research grants and student aid."

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Facebook's Bold, Compelling and Scary Engine of Discovery: The Inside Story of Graph Search | Wired Business | Wired.com

Facebook's Bold, Compelling and Scary Engine of Discovery: The Inside Story of Graph Search | Wired Business | Wired.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
With the social networking giant's newest feature, friends can type in any query and get real useful information–that Google can't touch.
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[INFOGRAPHIC] Instructional Design Model: Gagné’s 9 Events of Instruction

[INFOGRAPHIC] Instructional Design Model: Gagné’s 9 Events of Instruction | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Nicole Ligault

 

"This weekend I decided it was about time I created a new instructional design themed infographic. I’ve created a few in the past, which I’ve shared on my blog (here, here and here), and they’ve proven to be some of my most popular postings.

 

"How did I go about creating this infographic? For starters, I browsed online through some instructional design sites to get ideas for what I wanted my subject to be. In the past I’ve designed an infographic illustrating the ADDIE model and Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Evaluations so when I stumbled across an article mentioning Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction I was intrigued. Of course I had heard about Gagne and his nine events, but I wasn’t too familiar with them. In fact, I couldn’t even name one event! Since I like to use my infographic development process to learn something new about instructional design, I thought this would be a good topic. The next step in my process was to do a Google Images search for some infographic design ideas, to help me get inspired. Then I created the infographic in Adobe Photoshop, starting with the design of the heading/title of the infographic. Once I had the title narrowed down, I used those same fonts and colours throughout the rest of the graphic. I’d say it took about an hour, maybe an hour and a half, to complete. I got to be creative and learn something new about instructional design, so I think it’s a success!"

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The Future Of Coworking And Why It Will Give Your Business A Huge Edge | Fast Company

The Future Of Coworking And Why It Will Give Your Business A Huge Edge | Fast Company | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Lydia Dishman

 

"Fun. Friendly. Inspiring. Collaborative. Productive. If you wouldn't define your workplace with any or all of those terms, you may have to ditch your own desk and take a seat at a coworking space near you. Even if you aren’t an entrepreneur or freelancer, the benefits of coworking, according to Deskmag’s annual Global Coworking Survey, are pretty hard to ignore: 71 percent of participants reported a boost in creativity since joining a coworking space, while 62 percent said their standard of work had improved.

 

"The study also found that half of all coworkers access their work space around the clock--with only 30 percent preferring to work during normal business hours. “The future of work should not be dictated by space or place, but by the individual and the tasks that he or she has to deliver,” Regus CEO Mark Dixon tells Fast Company. “Many employees are now measured by output and productivity, and not just 40 hours spent sitting at a desk. Workers and the companies for which they work are increasingly realizing that they need to provide and utilize a wide range of workplaces to accommodate an increasingly diverse workforce with very different expectations of what work is, and where and when it should happen,” he explains."

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The Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks (JALN) | The Sloan Consortium

The Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks (JALN) | The Sloan Consortium | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The aim of the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks is to describe original work in asynchronous learning networks (ALN), including experimental results. Our mission is to provide practitioners in online education with knowledge about the very best research in online learning. Papers emphasizing results, backed by data are the norm. Occasionally, papers reviewing broad areas are published, including critical reviews of thematic areas. Papers useful to administrators are welcome. JALN is published 4 times a year, and entire issues are published from time-to-time around a single topic or disciplinary areas. Calls for papers for special issues include specific due dates, but general submissions are accepted year-round. . The Journal adheres to traditional standards of double-blind peer review, and authors are encouraged to provide quantitative data; currently JALN's acceptance rate is 25%. The original objective of the Journal was to establish ALN as a field by publishing articles from authoritative and reliable sources. The Journal is now a major resource for knowledge about online learning."

Jim Lerman's insight:

All articles are now available for free download.

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, January 19, 2013 12:57 AM

All articles freely available online....

Nancy L Zingrone's curator insight, January 26, 2013 7:30 PM

This is a fascinating journal; the list of research reports has a lot to offer. We're heading into a new world in higher education.