:: The 4th Era ::
Follow
Find
68.9K views | +26 today
:: The 4th Era ::
Exploration of the new era in human history marked by invention of the Internet
Curated by Jim Lerman
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Why Apple Maps and Siri Required Apple To Break Its 'No Beta' Rule - Forbes

Why Apple Maps and Siri Required Apple To Break Its 'No Beta' Rule - Forbes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Erick Jackson

 

'

So, let’s go back to the hot story of last Friday: Apple Maps. I contend that Maps’ release wasn’t a mistake at all. It was a necessary first step for Apple to having a dominant Maps product over Google.

The best article I’ve seen on Map-gate is by Kontra at Counternotions. In it, he clearly lays out that mapping is hard and requires lots of data. It took Google (GOOG) 8 years to get its product to its current iteration. Even now, Google Maps isn’t perfect. If I’m driving in the country somewhere, it won’t always default to the most direct path. Sometimes I have to apply common sense. But, of course, it is very good.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Is it good to be bad? | Project Foundry

Is it good to be bad? | Project Foundry | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"The [above] chart was a key talking point during Yong Zhao’s keynote address at the 2012 ISTE conference (International Society for Technology in Education). It charts the PISA math scores for 23 developed countries and compares them, side-by-side, to each country’s respective perceived entrepreneurial capability.

 

"It would be pretty difficult not to notice the inverse relationship between the two. In general, as a country’s PISA math scores go up, their ability to think and act in an entrepreneurial fashion decreases. And vice versa. Using this data we could make the case that bad test scores lead to more out-of-the-box thinkers – that testing poorly in math means showing a greater potential to innovate.

 

"Okay, so that’s oversimplifying it a bit too much. Of course we want our students to test well and to be comfortable and confident when applying what they know to any sort of exam. But this obvious inverse relationship can’t be ignored. So what’s the cause?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Hechinger Report | Education Nation: In Arizona desert, a charter school competes

Hechinger Report | Education Nation: In Arizona desert, a charter school competes | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Nick Pandolfo

Summary by ASCD SmartBrief

 

"Students attending Carpe Diem Collegiate High School and Middle School in Yuma, Ariz., attend class in a blended-learning environment in which they spend half of their time sitting in office-like cubicles, receiving instruction online in their core subject areas. The rest of the time, they are working in small groups in workshops led by subject-specific teachers. Students, who attend school four days a week, have performed better on the Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards exam since 2005, when the school switched to a blended model."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

How the Arts Unlock the Door to Learning | Edutopia

How the Arts Unlock the Door to Learning | Edutopia | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

 

By Mariko Nobori

 

Since they started implementing arts integration schoolwide in 2009, Bates has seen a 23 percent drop in the average number of referrals and suspensions per student. The school’s percentage of students proficient or advanced in math has grown four times more than the state's over the same period, and five times more in reading. Not all lessons are taught with arts integration, but Bates takes pains to diligently track those that have been in a regular log (PDF), and they report substantial improvements in student comprehension and retention.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

20 Education Technology Books You Should Be Reading | Edudemic

20 Education Technology Books You Should Be Reading | Edudemic | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

Posted by Jeff Dunn

 

"We’ve put together a list of some of the best edtech reads out there, from essential texts on the subject to cutting-edge research, that will help you learn about and implement educational technologies and curricula that can truly benefit both you and your students."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jim Lerman from Interactive Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

The 20 Best Books About EdTech Today - Online Universities

The 20 Best Books About EdTech Today - Online Universities | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
We've put together a list of some of the best edtech reads out there, from essential texts on the subject to cutting-edge research.

Via Anne Whaits
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Training Teachers to Embrace Reform | Wall St. Journal

Training Teachers to Embrace Reform | Wall St. Journal | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Amanda Ripley

Summary by PEN Weekly Newsblast

 

"Many countries have revolutionized their education systems in recent years, writes Amanda Ripley in The Wall Street Journal, but none has done it through strikes, walkouts, or righteous indignation. There is a significant relationship between the professionalism of teacher unions and the health of an education system, and the issue is how to elevate the entire craft of teaching without going to war with teachers. The Finns accomplished this by shutting down their less effective teacher-training schools and moving teacher preparation into elite universities. Aspiring teachers were required to master subject matter and practice at length in high-performing public schools. Only after this part of the system was reformed were mandates lifted and teachers themselves asked to design a new national curriculum. In Ontario, Canada, Education Minister Gerard Kennedy spent months laying groundwork with stakeholders before negotiations with the teacher union began for a new teachers' contract in 2005. The plan that emerged put pressure on Ontario's schools to improve results but also offered help to educators, and worked in part because Canada already had fairly rigorous education colleges, so teachers had the skills to adapt. By acceding to teacher requests for smaller elementary-class sizes, politicians bought good will. What's happening in Chicago is about more than just Chicago, Ripley says: "It's about the deeper problem of transforming America's schools. For too long our education reformers have tried to create a professional teaching corps from the top down, and union leaders have fought to maintain an untenable system."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

New online community shares ed-tech best practices | eSchool News

New online community shares ed-tech best practices | eSchool News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Project RED, an ed-tech research and advocacy group that has been studying how technology can help re-engineer the education system, has created a new online community for school technology decision makers that includes access to its research findings.

 

"With funding from HP, Intel, the Pearson Foundation, and SMART Technologies, Project RED a few years ago launched a national research study of 2,000 schools, examining each school’s technology program. The group’s findings suggested that—when implemented effectively—technology can provide a significant return on investment (ROI) and help raise achievement. Project RED also defined what it meant by “effective” implementation: in other words, what the research suggested was the best way for using technology to get the maximum ROI in schools.

 

"Now, Project RED has developed a methodology for effective ed-tech implementation, based on its findings. Tom Greaves, chairman of the Greaves Group and one of the creators of Project RED, said the methodology is available through the group’s new professional learning community that offers tools, resources, and opportunities for school and district leaders to collaborate."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Literature is the new Latin | thestar.com

Literature is the new Latin | thestar.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Michael Reist

 

"I am not calling for the abolition of the study of literature, nor for its watering down, nor am I suggesting it is irrelevant. I am suggesting greater choice. Perhaps one size does not fit all. Perhaps we could change the sticker system. We could allow greater diversity of educational pathways and fewer roadblocks in the form of arbitrary prerequisites. We currently require students to be generalists up until their last two years of high school. The school of the future could allow greater specialization earlier on. Instead of a generic diploma, what about a diploma with an arts, math, science or — dare we hope — literature specialization?

 

"Literature will never die, but if we keep force-feeding it to the kids of cyberspace, its integrity will certainly suffer."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

New site offers help with shift to digital education | eSchool News

New site offers help with shift to digital education | eSchool News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

 

By Laura Devanney

 

"A new online community that launched Aug. 22 aims to help schools and districts as they move toward digital education and implement corresponding policy changes.

 

"The U.S. Department of Education, the Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at North Carolina State University, and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) partnered to create the online community of practice.

 

"Epic-ed aims to empower digital transitions at all stages of development, including school leaders who are thinking about moving to ubiquitous computing environments, those who wish to implement ed-tech pilot projects, and those who are ready for full-scale implementation.

 

“Epic-ed will provide K-12 educators, district leaders, and other community participants with a unique channel to get connected and develop strategies for navigating the digital transition,” said CoSN CEO Keith Krueger. “With increased peer-to-peer interaction and greater connectivity, epic-ed members will have an opportunity to learn from each other, share ideas, and ultimately implement effective plans to help ease the transition and maximize the benefits of technology-enabled learning environments.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

You’re Only Cheating Your Students: The Critical Flaws of High Stakes Testing

You’re Only Cheating Your Students: The Critical Flaws of High Stakes Testing | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kim Dancy

 

"This September, more than 49 million students will return to public school classrooms across the country. By June, these students will have received a minimum of 160 days of instruction from nearly four million teachers. These same students will complete a gauntlet of tests, designed to measure academic proficiency in reading, math and other subjects, and their scores will influence whether teachers get bonuses or pink slips, not to mention which schools get shut down entirely. With such high stakes associated with these exams, it’s no wonder that some school officials have resorted to extreme measures to mask low or declining student performance.

 

"Suspicions of widespread cheating first broke in Atlanta in 2009. Since then, the phenomenon has snowballed: allegations have surfaced in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Detroit, Denver, Los Angeles, Brooklyn, Houston and Memphis, just to name a few. Then there are the horror stories—the principals who forced their teachers to crawl under tables at meetings as punishment for refusing to cheat, or the purported “answer changing parties” that were held by school administrators. As sensationalist as these anecdotes may be, they’re indicative of a pervasive and daunting trend in the world of K-12 education."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

The "Other" Learning Domain: Developing Emotional Intelligence in a Digital Age

The "Other" Learning Domain: Developing Emotional Intelligence in a Digital Age | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Michelle Pacansky-Brock

 

"Why is it that the cognitive domain of learning plays such a visible, central role in mainstream conversations about learning theory and practice in higher education while the affective domain frequently takes a back seat? Sprinkled throughout the web, we find visuals of Bloom's taxonomy of the cognitive domain (nowadays usually the revised version) in a myriad of formats. Here are the results of a Google Image Search using the terms "Blooms taxonomy." Take a peek. How many results illustrate the affective domain?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

WEBINAR: Education for Life and Work | Alliance For Excellent Education Media

WEBINAR: Education for Life and Work | Alliance For Excellent Education Media | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"There is a growing consensus that all students need to develop the abilities to use their knowledge to think critically and solve problems, communicate effectively, and learn how to learn. These deeper learning competencies are increasingly seen as essential for student success in a complex world. But what is the evidence to back up these beliefs?

 

"In a recently released report, Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century, a committee of the National Research Council (NRC) finds that these cognitive competencies are associated with desirable educational, career, and health outcomes. The report also finds that these competencies can be taught in ways that promote students’ ability to transfer their knowledge to new settings. The report concludes that policymakers should establish assessments, teacher education programs, and curriculum and instructional programs that support students’ acquisition of deeper learning competencies.

 

"The Alliance for Excellent Education held a webinar on September 12 to explore Education for Life and Work and its implications for policy. The chair of the NRC committee, James Pellegrino, and an NRC committee member, Christine Massey, highlighted key findings. Christopher Shearer of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, which is funding a major initiative to support deeper learning, and Linda Darling-Hammond of Stanford University, discussed the policy implications. Bob Wise, president of the Alliance and former governor of West Virginia, moderated the discussion. Panelists also addressed questions submitted by webinar viewers from across the country."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

British Columbia plans to overhaul K-12 curriculum; greater emphasis on concepts over facts | Vancouver Sun

British Columbia plans to overhaul K-12 curriculum; greater emphasis on concepts over facts | Vancouver Sun | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Janet Steffenhagen

 

"The B.C. education ministry is planning a major overhaul of the K-12 curriculum to focus less on facts and more on big ideas.

 

"A discussion paper posted online as schools were preparing to welcome students back today says the current curriculum has too many objectives, is highly prescriptive and is overly concerned with facts rather than concepts. “[It emphasizes] what they learn over how they learn, which is exactly the opposite of what modern education should strive to do,” the paper says."

 

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/plans+overhaul+curriculum+greater+emphasis+concepts+over+facts/7183847/story.html#ixzz27VciD5Id

 

Via The Committed Sardine blog

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

'Dropout Nation' a story of hope

'Dropout Nation' a story of hope | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kathleen Murrill

summary by ASCD SmartBrief

 

"A documentary called "Dropout Nation" will premiere at 9 p.m. EDT tonight on PBS' Frontline. A film crew spent one year following four students who attend Houston's Sharpstown High School, where officials are working to improve graduation rates with its Apollo 20 program. Developed by Roland Fryer of Harvard University's Education Innovation Laboratory, Apollo 20 is built around five tenets: effective principals and teachers, more instructional time, use of data to lead instruction, tutoring and a culture of high expectations for everyone"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

What The iPad Has Done To Education | TeachThought

What The iPad Has Done To Education | TeachThought | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Terry Heick

 

"As the iPad approaches popularity that’d make The Beatles blush, it’s easy to forget what technology in learning looked like before the little tablet from Cupertino entered our collective pedagogical consciousness. It’s also easy to forget what exactly it does from a functional perspective that makes it such an effective teaching tool.

 

"When adopting any new learning tool, from technology to curricula to instructional strategies, the clearer the picture of how that tool ideally functions can be helpful in improving its use."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Beyond the Chicago Teachers Strike: Where the Next Fights Will Be | TIME.com

Beyond the Chicago Teachers Strike: Where the Next Fights Will Be  | TIME.com | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kayla Webly

 

"The next battlegrounds will likely be in New Jersey. In Paterson, N.J., where teachers are entering their third school year without a contract, union leaders on Monday essentially told their members to do the bare minimum until an agreement is reached. That means no coming to work early or staying late tohelp students and no volunteering to lead extracurricular activities. “The district has taken advantage of our teachers’ good nature and professionalism to put in all kinds of extra work,” Peter Tirri, the president of the local union chapter, the Paterson Education Association, told the Paterson Press. “We’re trying to make the point that we’re tired of working without a contract.”

 

"Meanwhile, Newark, N.J., which has been without a teachers’ contract since 2010, is trying to hammer out a merit pay system that education reformers are hoping will serve as a model for the rest of the nation. The proposed system would make eligible for raises only those teachers who are rated as being “effective” or “highly effective;” the status quo ties pay increases to the number of years worked. Neither the Paterson nor the Newark unions are expected to strike (teacher strikes are legal in New Jersey, but courts have taken a hard line against them, even going as far as throwing some 200 teachers in jail during a strike in Newark in 1971), but the president of the Newark Teachers Union, Joe Del Grosso, told the Wall Street Journal his members could be swayed by the outcome in Chicago. “You have members who look at the news,” he said. “If the teachers there prevail in their way, the teachers here would want to prevail here also. It’s just human nature.”

 

Read more: http://nation.time.com/2012/09/21/beyond-the-chicago-teachers-strike-where-the-next-fights-will-be/#ixzz27OZ3MYng

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Schooling Beyond Measure

Schooling Beyond Measure | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Alfie Kohn

 

"To be overly enamored of numbers is to be vulnerable to their misuse, a timely example being the pseudoscience of "value-added modeling" of test data, debunked by experts but continuing to sucker the credulous. The trouble, however, isn't limited to lying with statistics. None of these problems with quantification disappears when no dishonesty or incompetence is involved. Likewise, better measurements or more thoughtful criteria for rating aren't sufficient."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Leading the change at Oyler School | Marketplace.org

Leading the change at Oyler School | Marketplace.org | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Amy Scott

Summary by PEN Weekly Newsblast

 

"In a profile of the Oyler School in the "urban Appalachian" Lower Price Hill neighborhood of Cincinnati, American Public Media's Marketplace describes its function as a community learning center, part of a growing movement in education that maintains that helping poor kids to succeed in school is best accomplished by fighting the effects of poverty. Oyler has worked with nonprofits and government agencies to install a health center and a vision clinic on campus, and the school is open from early morning until late at night. Kids can eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner there and take home food on weekends. A $21 million renovation has created more space for these services, and added air conditioning, real lab equipment, and smart boards. With a new daycare and preschool, Principal Craig Hockenberry says Oyler now serves kids from age six weeks to 22. "In theory there should be no kid, no child or anybody in our community not getting full services here," he says. Academically, the services are making a difference, with test scores slowly improving. This year Hockenberry has another goal: "I want to start working on the neighborhood." He wants the boards to start coming down off the houses, and the drug dealers to leave. "I want people to come and see this as a great school in a great neighborhood," he says."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Cheating Upwards | NY Magazine

Cheating Upwards | NY Magazine | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Robert Kolker

 

"On Wednesday, June 13, Nayeem ­Ahsan walked into a fourth-floor classroom at Stuyvesant High School with some two dozen other students to take a physics test—one of a number of Regents Exams that many New York State high-school juniors are required to take. Small and skinny with thick black hair and a bright, shy smile, Nayeem is 16. Like many ­teenage boys, he seems to straddle two worlds: One moment you see a man, ­another a boy.

 

"The son of Bangladeshi immigrants, Nayeem was born in Flushing Hospital and raised in Jackson Heights, a 35-­minute subway ride to Stuyvesant in lower Manhattan. In the academically elite world of Stuyvesant, Nayeem maintains solid if unremarkable grades, and is a friendly, popular-enough kid known to take photographs of sports teams after school and post them on Facebook. When he walked into the exam room that morning, he seemed confident and calm. Nothing about him suggested he was about to pull off the most brazen feat of cheating in the illustrious school’s 107-year history."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Curriki launches free, project-based algebra course online | eSchool News

Curriki launches free, project-based algebra course online | eSchool News | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

From the website

 

"Curriki, a global K-12 community for creating, sharing, and finding open learning resources, has launched a free Algebra 1 coursealigned with the Common Core State Standards. Available online, this project-based modular course engages students through real-world examples, projects, interactive web 2.0 tools, videos, and targeted feedback, Curriki says.Developed with funding from AT&T, Curriki Algebra 1 is modular so it can be used as a supplement, as the foundation for students’ Algebra 1 curriculum, in an after-school program, or in a home-school environment."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Is Educational Choice a Good Thing? Yes, If…… | Cooperative Catalyst

Is Educational Choice a Good Thing?  Yes, If…… | Cooperative Catalyst | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Kristan Morrison

 

"So, I am stuck in this weird place – of liking a concept in theory, but really being unhappy with the attempted operationalizations of it. How do I reconcile? Well, the best source I have found that has given me some insight into how to balance my beliefs and understandings is a collection of white papers put together by Rethinking Schools in a book called Keeping the Promise: The Debate over Charter Schools. In this 2008 book, they provide chapters that detail the charter school experiences in various areas (D.C., New Orleans, Ohio, and Boston). While all quite interesting, the best chapter to me is the first one entitled “Charter Schools and the Values of Public Education” written by George Wood and the late Theodore Sizer. In this chapter, the authors lay out five guiding questions that have helped me to judge educational choice programs. And so, when I speak with folks who are critical of my support for educational options for all students, I try to make clear that educational choice is a good thing IF certain factors are also present. And my IF statements all relate to Sizer’s and Wood’s five guiding questions, four of which are “linked to the enduring values of our public system of schooling (equity, access, public purpose, and public ownership),” and the fifth is a question about the promise of choice programs “to use freedom from regulation to innovate and show how public schooling can work for all citizens” (p.8).".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

Teaching With Tablets » Online Universities

Teaching With Tablets » Online Universities | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it
Tablets can be used for much more than playing games and reading the latest e-books. Learn more about how tablets are also changing the face of education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

How to Doodle in VoiceThread Mobile & Why it Matters

How to Doodle in VoiceThread Mobile & Why it Matters | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Michelle Pacansky-Brock

 

"Using the raw gesture of the human hand to control the actions on a mobile device is proving to open a world of new dazzling cognitive leaps for individuals with particular learning differences. Beyond that, however, giving students the option to Doodle on slide while they are responding to a discussion prompt or having them demonstrate how to work through the rest of a problem set are ways to engage the psychomotor cognitive domain in an online learning environment that nearly always left dormant.

 

"The Doodle feature gives users the ability to draw on a slide while leaving a voice or video comment on an iPhone or iPad (if you are using VoiceThread on a full web browser, the Doodle feature also works with text commenting)."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jim Lerman
Scoop.it!

What Public Charter Schools Have Taught Us About Public Education | Huffington Post

What Public Charter Schools Have Taught Us About Public Education | Huffington Post | :: The 4th Era :: | Scoop.it

By Nina Rees

 

"First, the achievement gap can be closed, and every child, regardless of where they live or their socio-economic status, can achieve at high academic levels. No longer can America view some children as un-teachable, or some families as apathetic to their children's education....

 

"Second, in this hyper-partisan atmosphere, pubic charter schools are supported from legislators and politicians from both sides of the aisle. Charter schools are now offered in 41 states and Washington, D.C., providing families a choice among public schools, and giving teachers different options in where and how they teach....

 

"And lastly, after more than 200 studies on charter schools, we've learned that we can create innovative, new, high-quality public schools that educate students and help them succeed and develop. Charter schools have broken down the barriers of who can help children learn, and how schools are organized and run, by bringing effective innovation into the teaching and learning process. Because of this, charter schools have driven many trends, including integrating and utilizing technology in effective ways; transforming how teachers and school leaders are recruited, supported, and retained; and reinventing how schools are operated and educational opportunities are provided."

more...
No comment yet.